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I'm a beginner when it comes to path finding and, while I do understand the basic idea of A*, I still don't get why, when backtracing, the implementation doesn't get stuck in a loop between the two latest nodes visited.

To be more clear, I've been looking at the code from here (which I'm going to copy and paste, in case the link dies):

class Node():
    """A node class for A* Pathfinding"""

    def __init__(self, parent=None, position=None):
        self.parent = parent
        self.position = position

        self.g = 0
        self.h = 0
        self.f = 0

    def __eq__(self, other):
        return self.position == other.position


def astar(maze, start, end):
    """Returns a list of tuples as a path from the given start to the given end in the given maze"""

    # Create start and end node
    start_node = Node(None, start)
    start_node.g = start_node.h = start_node.f = 0
    end_node = Node(None, end)
    end_node.g = end_node.h = end_node.f = 0

    # Initialize both open and closed list
    open_list = []
    closed_list = []

    # Add the start node
    open_list.append(start_node)

    # Loop until you find the end
    while len(open_list) > 0:

        # Get the current node
        current_node = open_list[0]
        current_index = 0
        for index, item in enumerate(open_list):
            if item.f < current_node.f:
                current_node = item
                current_index = index

        # Pop current off open list, add to closed list
        open_list.pop(current_index)
        closed_list.append(current_node)

        # Found the goal
        if current_node == end_node:
            path = []
            current = current_node
            while current is not None:
                path.append(current.position)
                current = current.parent
            return path[::-1] # Return reversed path

        # Generate children
        children = []
        for new_position in [(0, -1), (0, 1), (-1, 0), (1, 0), (-1, -1), (-1, 1), (1, -1), (1, 1)]: # Adjacent squares

            # Get node position
            node_position = (current_node.position[0] + new_position[0], current_node.position[1] + new_position[1])

            # Make sure within range
            if node_position[0] > (len(maze) - 1) or node_position[0] < 0 or node_position[1] > (len(maze[len(maze)-1]) -1) or node_position[1] < 0:
                continue

            # Make sure walkable terrain
            if maze[node_position[0]][node_position[1]] != 0:
                continue

            # Create new node
            new_node = Node(current_node, node_position)

            # Append
            children.append(new_node)

        # Loop through children
        for child in children:

            # Child is on the closed list
            for closed_child in closed_list:
                if child == closed_child:
                    continue

            # Create the f, g, and h values
            child.g = current_node.g + 1
            child.h = ((child.position[0] - end_node.position[0]) ** 2) + ((child.position[1] - end_node.position[1]) ** 2)
            child.f = child.g + child.h

            # Child is already in the open list
            for open_node in open_list:
                if child == open_node and child.g > open_node.g:
                    continue

            # Add the child to the open list
            open_list.append(child)


def main():

    maze = [[0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
            [0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
            [0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
            [0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
            [0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
            [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
            [0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
            [0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
            [0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
            [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0]]

    start = (0, 0)
    end = (7, 6)

    path = astar(maze, start, end)
    print(path)


if __name__ == '__main__':
    main()

In this specific case this looks easy enough, but if the "maze" is something like this:

maze = 
   [[0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
    [0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
    [0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
    [0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
    [0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 1, 1, 0, 0, 0],
    [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0],
    [0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 1, 1, 0, 0, 0],
    [0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
    [0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
    [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0]]

When the examined node is (5, 5), there's a dead end, so the algorithm should "backtrack" to node (3, 5) and go down from there.

My problem is that I really don't understand how that happens. Going back one node and checking the neighbours means checking everything again and it would just go back to (5, 5).

This does not happen, because the implementation is working just fine, but I really don't seem to be able to grasp how. Any hint?

  • 1
    First thing, I think you mean backtrack to node (5, 3) and not (3, 5). Second, I'll give you a hint - Think about the usage of closed nodes. When do we use it? Where do we check if a certain node is already there? – Zionsof Apr 15 at 12:43
2

The point is that each node is visited at most one time when running Dijkstra or A*.
That is because each time a node is being visited (after we pop it from the queue), we 'mark' this node as being already visited. In the implementation you gave, the marking is made by adding the node to closed_list:

closed_list.append(current_node)

The fact that the node is now is closed_list will allow to check if a node has been visited already before pushing it on the queue. That is done a bit further in the code (clumsily):

            # Child is on the closed list
            for closed_child in closed_list:
                if child == closed_child:
                    continue

This mechanism is essential to ensure that the algorithm terminates (both for Dijkstra or A*), and that its complexity is in O(n.log n).
In most implementations though, you will not see a closed_list, but rather a visited boolean associated to each node, or a color (white if not visited, green if already visited). They're all equivalent in terms of termination guarantee (not necessarily in terms of performance, since a list lookup can cost O(n)).

  • Thanks, I'm now coding it from scratch to see if I properly get it. I'm not so sure about how to keep track of the visited nodes in an optimized way, but that's for another question, I guess. – ChatterOne Apr 16 at 7:31
  • The simpler, the better I would say. A simple way to do so in python would be to use a dict that maps nodes to a boolean, like visited = {node: False for node in G.nodes()}. – m.raynal Apr 16 at 7:44
  • Yes, that's the direction where I'm going now, but facing this kind of problems is tricky when being completely self-taught in computer science – ChatterOne Apr 16 at 9:15

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