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I have a matrix that I want to split up into two. The two new are sort of tangled together, but I do have a "start" and "stop" array indicating what rows belong to each new matrix.

I have given a small example below including my own solution which I do not find satisfying.

Is there a smarter way of splitting the matrix?

Note that there is a certain periodicity in this example, which in not the case in the real matrix.

import numpy as np

np.random.seed(1)
a = np.random.normal(size=[20,2])
print(a)

b_start = np.array([0, 5, 10, 15])
b_stop = np.array([2, 7, 12, 17])

c_start = np.array([2, 7, 12, 17])
c_stop = np.array([5, 10, 15, 20])

b = a[b_start[0]:b_stop[0], :]
c = a[c_start[0]:c_stop[0], :]

for i in range(1, len(b_start)):
    b = np.append(b, a[b_start[i]:b_stop[i], :], axis=0)
    c = np.append(c, a[c_start[i]:c_stop[i], :], axis=0)

print(b)
print(c)
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You can use fancy indexing functionality of numpy.

index_b = np.array([np.arange(b_start[i], b_stop[i]) for i in range(b_start.size)])
index_c = np.array([np.arange(c_start[i], c_stop[i]) for i in range(c_start.size)])
b = a[index_b].reshape(-1, a.shape[1])
c = a[index_c].reshape(-1, a.shape[1])

This will give you the same output.

Test run:

import numpy as np

np.random.seed(1)
a = np.random.normal(size=[20,2])
print(a)

b_start = np.array([0, 5, 10, 15])
b_stop = np.array([2, 7, 12, 17])

c_start = np.array([2, 7, 12, 17])
c_stop = np.array([5, 10, 15, 20])

index_b = np.array([np.arange(b_start[i], b_stop[i]) for i in range(b_start.size)])
index_c = np.array([np.arange(c_start[i], c_stop[i]) for i in range(c_start.size)])
b = a[index_b].reshape(-1, a.shape[1])
c = a[index_c].reshape(-1, a.shape[1])
print(b)
print(c)

Output:

[[ 1.62434536 -0.61175641]
 [-0.52817175 -1.07296862]
 [ 1.46210794 -2.06014071]
 [-0.3224172  -0.38405435]
 [-1.10061918  1.14472371]
 [ 0.90159072  0.50249434]
 [-0.69166075 -0.39675353]
 [-0.6871727  -0.84520564]]
[[ 0.86540763 -2.3015387 ]
 [ 1.74481176 -0.7612069 ]
 [ 0.3190391  -0.24937038]
 [ 1.13376944 -1.09989127]
 [-0.17242821 -0.87785842]
 [ 0.04221375  0.58281521]
 [ 0.90085595 -0.68372786]
 [-0.12289023 -0.93576943]
 [-0.26788808  0.53035547]
 [-0.67124613 -0.0126646 ]
 [-1.11731035  0.2344157 ]
 [ 1.65980218  0.74204416]]

I did 100 runs of two approaches, running time is:

0.008551359176635742#python for loop
0.0034341812133789062#fancy indexing

And 10000 runs:

0.18994426727294922#python for loop
0.26583170890808105#fancy indexing
  • Thanks for the answer, works perfectly :) – s144117 Apr 16 at 7:29
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Congratulations on using np.append correctly. A lot of posters have problems with it.

But it is faster to collect values in a list, and do one concatenate. np.append makes a whole new array each time; list append just adds a pointer to the list in-place.

b = []
c = []
for i in range(1, len(b_start)):
    b.append(a[b_start[i]:b_stop[i], :])
    c.append(a[c_start[i]:c_stop[i], :])
b = np.concatenate(b, axis=0)
c = np.concatenate(c, axis=0)

or even

b = np.concatenate([a[i:j,:] for i,j in zip(b_start, b_stop)], axis=0)

The other answer does

idx = np.hstack([np.arange(i,j) for i,j in zip(b_start, b_stop)])
a[idx,:]

Based on previous SO questions I expect the two approaches to have about the same speed.

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