-1

I know a similar question has been asked quiete a few times. The difference here is, that I cannot use a solution that uses .toLocalString() or the wonderful Intl.NumberFormat().

Instead I have to build a formatter from scratch and I have started doing so with this part of code:

var currCurrency = "EUR";

function Format__Currency(val, currency) {

    switch (currency) {
        case 'EUR':
            currencyFormat = '0,00';
            val = val.replace('.', ',');
            val = currencyFormat.replace('0,00', val);
            break;
        case 'CHF':
            currencyFormat = '0.00';
            val = val.replace(',', '.');
            val = currencyFormat.replace('0.00', val);
            break;
        case 'USD':
            currencyFormat = '0.00';
            val = currencyFormat.replace('0.00', val);
            break;
        default:
            throw new Error('Unknown currency format');
            break;
    }
    return val;
}


var price = Format__Currency("1929.90", "EUR")
$("#result").html(price);
<script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/jquery/3.2.1/jquery.min.js"></script>

<div id="result"> - </div>

The "manual version" is ok for me as I only have to support 4 or 5 currencies and I will find out what their format has to be.

My problem is that currently I can only change the divider for the decimal places. But there are different thousands separators as well. e.g 1,920.90 for USD, 1.920,90 for EUR or 1'920.90 for CHF.

How can THIS be solved?

PS: If down voters can please tell me what's wrong with this question?

  • Please explain why you cannot use a solution that uses .toLocalString() or the wonderful Intl.NumberFormat(). – Archer Apr 15 at 15:18
  • because these values are not delivered from the backend to the frontend at the moment. I only know the currency, but I don't know the region (de-DE, de-CH, en-US ...). AND it's more than possible in my case, that a user, located in German, uses USD calculation in his application. Or a Swiss guy uses EUR. – JonSnow Apr 15 at 15:23
  • 1
    That doesn't explain why you can't format a number as a currency using the standard methods. – Archer Apr 15 at 15:33
  • hmm, I don't know how to do that dynamicly? – JonSnow Apr 15 at 15:35
  • 1
    Not entirely correct, EUR is formatted depending on locale/country - Ireland use normal 1,920.90 and Germany uses messed up 1.920,90 for instance. As @Archer said I don't understand why you can't use the mentioned methods if the issue isn't browser compatibility. You have locale from navigator.language. – Dominic Apr 15 at 16:01
1
function numberToReal(numero) {
    var numero = numero.toFixed(2).split('.');
    numero[0] = "R$ " + numero[0].split(/(?=(?:...)*$)/).join('.');
    return numero.join(',');
}

var x = numberToReal(9999000.33);
console.log(x);

var y = numberToReal(100000);
console.log(y);

var z = numberToReal(10.50);
console.log(z);

First of all, i get the number with 2 decimal point and i split in an array of two places(before and after point)

var numero = numero.toFixed(2).split('.');

This way in the second line i can work the number excluding decimal point (numero[0])

numero[0] = "R$ " + numero[0].split(/(?=(?:...)*$)/).join('.');

So i return the formatted number adding with decimal poiunt using comma(In Brazil we use commo to indicate decimal place)

return numero.join(',');

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