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An exception is raised as follows: System.Runtime.InteropServices.COMException: 'The RPC server is unavailable

Using EF To log the exception looks like this:

LogRecord.LogMessage = Message; db.SaveChanges();

When the SaveChanges is run, it logs nothing, and IDE jumps to the exception and highlights it. Any other type of exception the application logs correctly, and subsequently exits as intended.

Is there something known about Interopservices.COMExceptions and EF?

The logging method using EF works flawlessly. It is just this particular type of exception.

So let's look at a fairly basic database logger example and specifically the log helper:

  public static void UpdateExecutionLog(int Id, string Message)
        {
            using (var db = new LoggerAutomationEntities())
            {
                var LogRecord = db.LogsTable.Find(ExecutionId);
                LogRecord.LogMessage = Message;
                db.SaveChanges();
            }
        }

So we can see we are attempting an update to a log record. The logger class and the creation of the object seems unimportant thinking of the question's scope, so let me now jump to what got us here:

CurrentDomain_UnhandledException(object sender, UnhandledExceptionEventArgs args)
{
//call to write to the log
}

So any unhandled exception ends up here.

Now, A cast exception, divide by zero exception, etc all are processed fine in this way, and are logged accordingly. However, any COMException creates an issue.

Stepping through during a purposely caused COMException I see that all these lines are hit:

using (var db = new LoggerAutomationEntities())
                {
                    var LogRecord = db.LogsTable.Find(ExecutionId);
                    LogRecord.LogMessage = Message;
                    db.SaveChanges();
                }

However, once exited, the IDE highlights and opens the exception as if the logging processed never happened, and a log record never makes it to the database. This lead me to the conclusion that something with COMExceptions is unique, I just am not sure what.

  • See following : docs.microsoft.com/en-us/dotnet/api/… – jdweng Apr 15 at 16:32
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    hmm... this doesn't seem possible. EF has nothing to do with interop. So what does the LogRecord object look like, what is the Message object you are assigning? What does this logging method using EF look like? – reckface Apr 15 at 16:33
  • It’s just an exception that is thrown elsewhere in the application from another class. For whatever reason, when an exception like this is thrown, it does not log it. Stepping through the object creation and assignments I can see the message is successfully being added, I can even add a line to print it to the console, but when calling db.save changes, it’s as if it was never cared for. @reckface if for example I attempt a division by zero, the logger successfully is called and logs the exception. – MZawg Apr 15 at 17:49
  • @reckface the question scope is really just any knowledge at all on EF and certain exceptions causing it to have issues during the db.save. Because I can replicate the problem with any exception I raise of the COM type stated in the question. All other exceptions do not cause such an issue. – MZawg Apr 15 at 17:51
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    @MZawg: Is there something known about Interopservices.COMExceptions and EF? This is unrelated as far as I know. What do you mean by: "The logging method using EF works flawlessly", what logging method? – reckface Apr 15 at 17:55
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This has nothing to do with Entity Framework at all. Nothing. What you are referring to is how an unhandled exception is reported. To prove it, comment out your entity framework logic, and observe that the application will still terminate, and "the IDE highlights and opens the exception" It's likely that nothing is logged in your logger because with the interop exception the application terminates before it writes any log entries.

CurrentDomain_UnhandledException(object sender, UnhandledExceptionEventArgs args)
{
    // is not a guarantee that the error is handled.
}

You want a try catch block and some logging if you want to actually handle an error.

  • Thank you for that information. As I said, when another type of exception occurs it logs, so you have now solidified what I had slight suspicion of. Thank you for all the help! – MZawg Apr 16 at 13:34

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