1

I have a jsonb structure in PostgreSQL 9.6 that contains a nested array structure similar to the example below:

continents:[
   {
       id: 1,
       name: 'North America',
       countries: [
           {
               id: 1,
               name: 'USA',
               subdivision: [
                  {
                     id: 1,
                     name: 'Oregon',
                     type: 'SOME_TYPE'
                  }
               ]
           } 
       ]
   }
]

How can I change the 'type' attribute of multiple subdivisions since it its nested within two arrays ( countries and subdivision )?

I've come across other answers and am able to do so on a record by record basis (assuming table is map and jsonb column is divisions ):

update map
set divisions = jsonb_set( divisions, '{continents,0,countries,0,subdivisions,0,type}', '"STATE"', FALSE);

Is there a way to programatically change that attribute for all subdivisions?

I think I'm getting close, I can query all subdivision types using the query below, but am struggling to figure out how to update them:

WITH subdivision_data AS (
    WITH country_data AS (
       select continents -> 'countries' as countries
       from  map, jsonb_array_elements( map.divisions -> 'continents' ) continents
    )
    select country_item -> 'subdivisions' as subdivisions
    from country_data cd, jsonb_array_elements( cd.countries ) country_item
)
select subdivision_item ->> 'type' as subdivision_type
from subdivision_data sub, jsonb_array_elements( sub.subdivisions ) subdivision_item;

Here's some of the questions I came across. They seem to work only if you are trying to update a single level array though:

postgresql 9.5 using jsonb_set for updating specific jsonb array value

How to update deeply nested JSON object based on filter criteria in Postgres?

Postgres/JSON - update all array elements

  • 1
    speed is not much of a concern since I don't intend on updating this structure often. – Max Apr 15 at 20:49
0

1 general way to do this would be to explode the json, replace values using plain old sql & aggregate back to the original json shape. But this requires you to have full knowledge of the document structure

Here's an example of this in a self-contained select statement

WITH data(map) AS (
VALUES(JSONB '{"continents":[{"id": 1,"name": "North America","countries": [{"id": 1,"name": "USA","subdivision": [{"id": 1,"name": "Oregon","type": "SOME_TYPE"}]}]}]}')
)
, expanded AS (
SELECT 
  (continents#>>'{id}')::int continent_id
, continents#>>'{name}' continent_name 
, (countries#>>'{id}')::int country_id
, countries#>>'{name}' country_name
, (subdivisions#>>'{id}')::int subdivision_id
, subdivisions#>>'{name}' subdivision_name
, CASE WHEN subdivisions#>>'{type}' = 'SOME_TYPE'      -- put all update where conditions here
        AND continents#>>'{name}' = 'North America'    -- this is where the value is changed
  THEN 'POTATO' 
  ELSE subdivisions#>>'{type}' 
  END subdivision_type
FROM data
, JSONB_ARRAY_ELEMENTS(map#>'{continents}') continents
, JSONB_ARRAY_ELEMENTS(continents#>'{countries}') countries
, JSONB_ARRAY_ELEMENTS(countries#>'{subdivision}') subdivisions
)
, subdivisions AS (
SELECT continent_id
, continent_name
, country_id
, country_name
, JSONB_BUILD_OBJECT('subdivisions', JSONB_AGG(JSONB_BUILD_OBJECT('id', subdivision_id, 'name', subdivision_name, 'type', subdivision_type))) subdivisions
FROM expanded
GROUP By 1, 2, 3, 4
)
, countries AS (
SELECT
  continent_id
, continent_name
, JSONB_BUILD_OBJECT('countries', JSONB_AGG(JSONB_BUILD_OBJECT('id', country_id, 'name', country_name, 'subdivision', subdivisions))) countries
FROM subdivisions
GROUP BY 1, 2
)
SELECT JSONB_BUILD_OBJECT('continents', JSONB_AGG(JSONB_BUILD_OBJECT('id', continent_id, 'name', continent_name, 'countries', countries))) map
FROM countries

Putting this into an update query, we get the following, where I'm assuming the source table is called data, and it has a unique column called id

UPDATE data SET map = updated.map
FROM (
expanded AS (
SELECT data.id data_id 
, (continents#>>'{id}')::int continent_id
, continents#>>'{name}' continent_name 
, (countries#>>'{id}')::int country_id
, countries#>>'{name}' country_name
, (subdivisions#>>'{id}')::int subdivision_id
, subdivisions#>>'{name}' subdivision_name
, CASE WHEN subdivisions#>>'{type}' = 'SOME_TYPE' 
        AND continents#>>'{name}' = 'North America' 
  THEN 'POTATO' 
  ELSE subdivisions#>>'{type}' 
  END subdivision_type
FROM data
, JSONB_ARRAY_ELEMENTS(map#>'{continents}') continents
, JSONB_ARRAY_ELEMENTS(continents#>'{countries}') countries
, JSONB_ARRAY_ELEMENTS(countries#>'{subdivision}') subdivisions
)
, subdivisions AS (
SELECT
  data_id
, continent_id
, continent_name
, country_id
, country_name
, JSONB_BUILD_OBJECT('subdivisions', JSONB_AGG(JSONB_BUILD_OBJECT('id', subdivision_id, 'name', subdivision_name, 'type', subdivision_type))) subdivisions
FROM expanded
GROUP By 1, 2, 3, 4, 5
)
, countries AS (
SELECT
  data_id
, continent_id
, continent_name
, JSONB_BUILD_OBJECT('countries', JSONB_AGG(JSONB_BUILD_OBJECT('id', country_id, 'name', country_name, 'subdivision', subdivisions))) countries
FROM subdivisions
GROUP BY 1, 2, 3
)
SELECT data_id, JSONB_BUILD_OBJECT('continents', JSONB_AGG(JSONB_BUILD_OBJECT('id', continent_id, 'name', continent_name, 'countries', countries))) map
FROM countries
GROUP BY 1

) updated
WHERE updated.data_id = data.id
0

At first I thought that something like this would work:

update map as m set
    divisions = jsonb_set(m1.divisions, array['continents',(d.rn-1)::text,'countries',(c.rn-1)::text,'subdivisions',(s.rn-1)::text,'type'], '"STATE"', FALSE)
from map as m1,
    jsonb_array_elements(m1.divisions -> 'continents') with ordinality as d(data,rn),
    jsonb_array_elements(d.data -> 'countries') with ordinality as c(data,rn),
    jsonb_array_elements(c.data -> 'subdivisions') with ordinality as s(data,rn)
where
    m1.id = m.id

db<>fiddle demo

But this does't work - see documentation

When a FROM clause is present, what essentially happens is that the target table is joined to the tables mentioned in the from_list, and each output row of the join represents an update operation for the target table. When using FROM you should ensure that the join produces at most one output row for each row to be modified. In other words, a target row shouldn't join to more than one row from the other table(s). If it does, then only one of the join rows will be used to update the target row, but which one will be used is not readily predictable.

What you can do is unnest your jsons with functions-json and then aggregate them back:

update map set
    divisions = jsonb_set(divisions, array['continents'],
        (select
            jsonb_agg(jsonb_set(
                d, array['countries'],
                (select 
                    jsonb_agg(jsonb_set(
                        c, array['subdivisions'],
                        (select
                            jsonb_agg(jsonb_set(s, array['type'], '"STATE"', FALSE))
                        from jsonb_array_elements(c -> 'subdivisions') as s),
                        FALSE
                    ))
                from jsonb_array_elements(d -> 'countries') as c)
            ))
        from jsonb_array_elements(divisions -> 'continents') as d),
        FALSE
    )

db<>fiddle demo

You can also create helper function which you can use instead of multiple subqueries:

create function jsonb_update_path(_data jsonb, _path text[], _value jsonb)
returns jsonb
as $$
begin
    if array_length(_path, 1) = 1 then
        return jsonb_set(_data, _path, _value, FALSE);
    else
        return (
            jsonb_set(
                _data, _path[1:1],
                (
                    select
                        jsonb_agg(jsonb_update_path(e, _path[2:], _value))
                    from jsonb_array_elements(_data -> _path[1]) as e
                )
            )
        );
    end if;
end
$$
language plpgsql

update map set
    divisions = jsonb_update_path(divisions, '{continents,countries,subdivisions,type}', '"STATE"')

db<>fiddle demo

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