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I have created a clone of Atari Breakout game using the ACM graphics library and just finished adding a highscore interface and functionality. The player's name and score should be displayed on the GUI window (it is successfully) and also be written to a .dat binary file.

However, when the code attempts to load the existing file I get the following error.

writing aborted; java.io.NotSerializableException: acm.graphics.GCanvasListener

I've researched this error online and it seems it can be solved by editing the class to implement Serializable. However, the class throwing this error is not one of my own but rather a class that belongs to the third-party ACM graphics library. How do I solve this?

I'm not even sure why this error is being caused in the first place since the data I'm attempting to serialize is only a name and score, I'm not trying to serialize a canvas of objects or anything like that.

Main class (called Breakout)

public class Breakout extends GraphicsProgram {
    ... // game variables
    public void run() {
        ... // this if clause runs when game ends
        if (brickCounter > 0) {
                removeAll(); // clears screen
                printGameOver(); // displays game over message
                HighscoreManager hm = new HighscoreManager();
                String name = getHighScoreName();
                hm.addScore(name, score);
                hm.displayHighscores();
        }
    }
    ... // game functionality methods
    private String getHighScoreName(){
        IODialog dialog = new IODialog();
        String name = dialog.readLine("Enter your name: ");
        return name;
    }

Score class

private class Score implements Serializable {
    private int score;
    private String name;

    public Score(String name, int score) {
        this.score = score;
        this.name = name;
    }

    public int getScore() { return score; }
    public String getName() { return name; }
}

ScoreComparator class

private class ScoreComparator implements Comparator<Score> {
    public int compare(Score score1, Score score2) {

        int sc1 = score1.getScore();
        int sc2 = score2.getScore();

        if (sc1 > sc2) {
            return -1;
        } else if (sc1 < sc2) {
            return 1;
        } else {
            return 0;
        }
    }
}

HighscoreManager class

private class HighscoreManager {
    private ArrayList<Score> scores;
    private static final String HIGHSCORE_FILE = ".//bin//scores.dat";
    ObjectOutputStream outputStream = null;
    ObjectInputStream inputStream = null;

    public HighscoreManager() {
        scores = new ArrayList<Score>(10);
    }

    public ArrayList<Score> getScores() {
        loadScoreFile();
        sort();
        return scores;
    }

    private void sort() {
        ScoreComparator comparator = new ScoreComparator();
        Collections.sort(scores, comparator);
    }

    public void addScore(String name, int score) {
        loadScoreFile();
        scores.add(new Score(name, score));
        updateScoreFile();
    }

    public void loadScoreFile() {
        try {
            inputStream = new ObjectInputStream(new FileInputStream(HIGHSCORE_FILE));
            scores = (ArrayList<Score>) inputStream.readObject();
        }
        catch (FileNotFoundException e) {
            System.out.println("[Load] File Not Found Error: " + e.getMessage());
        }
        catch (IOException e) {
            System.out.println("[Load] Input/Output Error: " + e.getMessage());
        }
        catch (ClassNotFoundException e) {
            throw new RuntimeException("[Load] Class Not Found Error: " + e.getMessage());
        }
        finally {
            try {
                if (outputStream != null) {
                    outputStream.flush();
                    outputStream.close();
                }
            } catch (IOException e) {
                System.out.println("[Load] Input/Output Error: " + e.getMessage());
            }
        }
    }

    public void updateScoreFile() {
        try {
            outputStream = new ObjectOutputStream(new FileOutputStream(HIGHSCORE_FILE));
            outputStream.writeObject(scores);
        }
        catch (FileNotFoundException e) {
            System.out.println("[Update] File Not Found Error: " + e.getMessage());
        }
        catch (IOException e) {
            System.out.println("[Update] Input/Output Error: " + e.getMessage());
        }
        finally {
            try {
                if (outputStream != null) {
                    outputStream.flush();
                    outputStream.close();
                }
            } catch (IOException e) {
                System.out.println("[Update] Input/Output Error: " + e.getMessage());
            }
        }
    }

    public void displayHighscores() {
        int max = 10;
        ArrayList<Score> scores;
        scores = getScores();
        int x = scores.size();

        if (x > max) {
            x = max;
        }

        removeAll(); // clears screen
        int npos = 160;
        int spos = 160;

        for (int i = 0; i < x; i++) {
            GLabel showName = new GLabel(scores.get(i).getName(), (getWidth() / 2.0) - 100, (getHeight() / 2.0) - npos);
            showName.move(-showName.getWidth() / 2, -showName.getHeight());
            showName.setColor(Color.WHITE);
            add(showName);
            npos -= 40;
        }

        for (int i = 0; i < x; i++) {
            GLabel showScore = new GLabel(Integer.toString(scores.get(i).getScore()), (getWidth() / 2.0) + 100, (getHeight() / 2.0) - spos);
            showScore.move(-showScore.getWidth() / 2, -showScore.getHeight());
            showScore.setColor(Color.WHITE);
            add(showScore);
            spos -= 40;
        }
    }

After running the application:

[Load] Input/Output Error: writing aborted; java.io.NotSerializableException: acm.graphics.GCanvasListener
[Update] Input/Output Error: acm.graphics.GCanvasListener
[Load] Input/Output Error: writing aborted; java.io.NotSerializableException: acm.graphics.GCanvasListener
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Your task will be to find a hidden reference from your name and score structure to the UI components. Many GUI applications use a lot of inner classes, and this might be the missing link.

When you have a class something like this:

class MyGame {
    private SomeUIWidget widget;
    class TopScore implements Serializable {
        String name;
        int score;
        ...
    }
    ...
}

There is a hidden member in TopScore that references the "enclosing instance" of MyGame, including its SomeUIWidget member. When you try to serialize a TopScore instance, all the rest gets dragged in with it.

You could simply declare TopScore as a static nested class. This means that there is no enclosing instance, and serves only to hide the TopScore class from other code. But, I would suggest just making TopScore a top-level class, in its own file, because it's likely that other objects will want to use those objects in different ways—that is, it seems like a likely candidate for part of your public API.

This is an educated guess, in the absence of any actual code. To get a better answer, reduce your code to the minimum required to demonstrate the problem, and include that in your question.

  • Currently the code is all in a single class and file, though there are several private classes nested within the main public class. I've edited my question with some code. Are you saying that the issue will most likely be solved if I move those private classes into files of their own? – Arbiter Apr 15 at 21:37
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    @Arbiter At the very least, add the static modifier to your Score class. Consider moving Score to a file of its own. Inner classes are most useful as a way to give classes access to private members of the enclosing object. You don't need that for Score. Nested classes (static classes enclosed by another) are mostly useful to hide classes that aren't needed by any other class. I could easily imagine use cases for reading or writing Score instances outside the UI class, so that indicates moving to a file of its own. Putting all of your code in a single class and file doesn't scale. – erickson Apr 15 at 21:41
  • Thank you, that fixed my problem. You are absolutely right, I'm not sure why I decided to move everything to a single file. I'll refactor my code now to ensure there are no more conflicts like this. Out of interest, how would you go about doing that? The comparator, score and highscore manager classes are easy to move but would you recommend creating a new class for anything else in the breakout (main) class? Just wondering is all. – Arbiter Apr 15 at 21:52
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    @Arbiter It's hard to say, but most likely my UI class or classes would still end up with a lot of private inner classes (or anonymous inner classes): those that handle a UI event by changing some state of the enclosing class. These classes have a strong dependency on their enclosing object and can live happily there. But if you have other classes (like Score, HighcoreManager, and ScoreComparator) that don't have any dependency on the enclosing class, I'd move them out. – erickson Apr 15 at 22:14
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You should go to the class where the fields name and score are, and add for example public class nameclass implements Serializable. I hope it works for you.

  • I've added that to my Score class (see updated question) yet the problem still persists... – Arbiter Apr 15 at 21:38
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    I have understand that private class Score is inside a class ¿am I right? if it's that way you should read this post: link – herMa694 Apr 15 at 22:19
  • Practically it says that inner classes cannot make them Serializable – herMa694 Apr 15 at 22:20

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