1

I think it should be pretty clear what I want to do - get an explicit specialization for int and string, and in C++ this is trivial with explicit specialization - is it possible to get this same behavior in C#? Assume I have a good reason for doing this and this is a trivial example of something broader in my program.

static class ReturnConstant<T>
{
    public static T FiveOrHello()
    {
        if(typeof(T) == typeof(int))
        {
            return 5;
        }
        else if (typeof(T) == typeof(string))
        {
            return "Hello!";
        }
        else
        {
            throw new NotImplementedException("OH NO");
        }
    }
}

Edit:

Here's the equivalent, perfectly legit c++ code:

template <typename T>
T giveConst();
template <>
int giveConst<int>() { return 5; }
template <>
std::string giveConst<std::string>() { return "Hello"; }
  • 1
    Assume I have a good reason for doing this and this is a trivial example of something broader in my program., ignoring that sentence, what are you trying to do? There must be better solution. – Christian Gollhardt Apr 16 at 1:53
  • I have a thing that takes parameters and returns a generic datatable, in C++, I have another thing that takes that generic datatable and returns typed information, in c++ I'd template that first thing and have it do the conversion automagically as above. – Carbon Apr 16 at 1:55
  • You should eloborate on that then. Your database isn't generic, if they have different types. It's an ungeneric any object or better object. Sounds like you realy need casts and probably a layer which handles different types of objects which are checked via is. Anyway without any real code, it's hard to give any advice. – Christian Gollhardt Apr 16 at 2:04
2

The only thing wrong with your implementation is that the C# compiler can't verify the type cast to T.

But you can work around that like this:

static class ReturnConstant<T>
{
    public static T FiveOrHello()
    {
        if (typeof(T) == typeof(int))
        {
            return (T)(object)5;
        }
        else if (typeof(T) == typeof(string))
        {
            return (T)(object)"Hello!";
        }
        else
        {
            throw new NotImplementedException("OH NO");
        }
    }
}
  • Oh nifty! What's the function of (object) here - is it like typename in c++? – Carbon Apr 16 at 2:16
  • 1
    object is a type, and it's the root of the .NET type hierarchy. I don't know the history, but my guess is that since no type conversion from object to any other type can be validated by the compiler, validation is turned off. And casting through object has become an idiom for performing an unchecked-at-compile-time type conversion. – David Browne - Microsoft Apr 16 at 2:26
1

No, it's impossible. Generic T for class ReturnConstant<T> means, that ReturnConstant<int> and ReturnConstant<string> are different types. And you can't return different types in common.

  • Ah, so because it's resolved at runtime, this is a cannot-differentiate-based-on-return-type-only type issue? – Carbon Apr 16 at 1:52
0

A concept you may be interested in is a discriminated union; it would allow you to return either an int or a string with a single type, but you'd have to check at runtime to work out which one actually got returned:

sadly the concept doesn't currently exist in a way that can be efficiently implemented, requiring some language support, which is not yet added.

https://github.com/dotnet/csharplang/issues/113

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