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I have some structs that may contain some certain number of unsigned integer (They are either uint32_t or uint64_t). I want to print out the value of these struct in an understandable way. For example I may have a struct like below.

struct test {
    uint32_t ab = 0;
    uint64_t cd = 1;
    uint32_t ef = 2;
};

I think I could have a method pass the address of this struct and print it out by using the size of this struct. But not sure how to write the code.

  • Even if you have the size of the struct... you still don't have the exact type of each member. To do what you want, you'll need (static) reflection. C++ doesn't have it yet, despite work being done towards it in future standard revisions. – StoryTeller Apr 16 at 6:28
  • I know that each member is either uint32_t or uint64_t. Would that be helpful? Some basic understanding about the information that struct contains would be ok for me. – taylorm Apr 16 at 6:32
  • Not enough I'm afraid. If they can appear in any order and in any number, you can't tell anything from a structure address and size alone. – StoryTeller Apr 16 at 6:33
  • With C++14, you could use magic_get. – Jarod42 Apr 16 at 10:19
3

As mentioned, C++11 has no reflection mechanism. The only way to obtain a list of members is to role out your own mechanism. Since you mentioned each member always has one of two types, it should be fairly straight forward. For instance, by creating a trait class.

template<class T>
struct mem_ptr {
    // Tagged union type to generically refer to a member of a struct T
    enum {u32, u64} alive;
    union {
        uint32_t T::* u32_ptr;
        uint64_t T::* u64_ptr;
    };
    mem_ptr(uint32_t T::* u32_ptr) : alive(u32), u32_ptr(u32_ptr) {}
    mem_ptr(uint64_t T::* u64_ptr) : alive(u64), u64_ptr(u64_ptr) {}
};

template<class> struct struct_members;

template<>
struct struct_members<test> {
    mem_ptr<test> members[3] = {
      &test::ab, &test::cd, &test::ef
    };
};

template<class T>
auto operator<<(std::ostream& os, T const& str) -> decltype(struct_members<T>::members, os) {
    struct_members<T> const mem;
    char const *delim = "";
    os << "{ ";
    for(auto& m : mem.members) {
        os << delim;
        delim = ", ";
        switch(m.alive) {
            case m.u32: os << (str.*(m.u32_ptr)); break;
            case m.u64: os << (str.*(m.u64_ptr)); break;
            default: break;
        }
    }
    os << " }";
    return os;
}

Putting the above to the test (pun intended) on wandbox, prints:

{ 0, 1, 2 }

With that in-place, you can add support for a new structure by just defining the struct_members table for it:

struct test2 {
    uint32_t ab1 = 5;
    uint64_t cd2 = 3;
    uint32_t ef3 = 8;
};

template<>
struct struct_members<test2> {
    mem_ptr<test2> members[3] = {
      &test2::ab1, &test2::cd2, &test2::ef3
    };
};

And the stream operator previously written will work for it too.

  • Technically there are ways to figure out the number of members and "tuplify" them by (ab)using brace initialization and structured bindings... – Max Langhof Apr 16 at 7:09
  • @MaxLanghof - You mean like Polukhin's magic_get? Wasn't it limited to C++14 and above? The question is tagged C++11. – StoryTeller Apr 16 at 7:10
  • Oh right, structured bindings are obviously out if we're in C++11. I need to pay more attention to language tags. – Max Langhof Apr 16 at 7:11
  • In what respect it is better than just writing a function saying std::cout << x.ab << ' ' << x.cd << ' ' x.de;? – aparpara Apr 16 at 7:42
  • @aparpara - Several ways. (1) It works with all standard streams types, not just std::cout. (2) The logic is centralized, and there is no need to write a function for every type that tries to keep to the same format. Less prone to copy paste errors. (3) The same table can be used in a similar operator >> to read a type back from a text file. And possibly in other places where this sort of reflective information may be of use. – StoryTeller Apr 16 at 7:48
2

If you need just a basic understanding about what is inside, you may reinterpret the structure as an array of uint32_t-s and print them in hex.

#include <iostream>
#include <iomanip>

struct test {
    uint32_t ab = 0;
    uint64_t cd = 1;
    uint32_t ef = 2;
};

// For those who don't respect strict aliasing rules mentioned in comments
/*
template<class T>
void printStruct(const T& s)
{
    auto* b = reinterpret_cast<const uint32_t*>(&s);
    auto* e = b + sizeof(T)/sizeof(uint32_t);
    std::cout << std::hex;
    for (auto* i = b; i != e; ++i)
        std::cout << std::setw(sizeof(uint32_t)*2) << std::setfill('0') << *i << ' ';
    std::cout << std::dec;
}
*/

// For those who do respect strict aliasing rules mentioned in comments
template<class T>
void printStruct(const T& s)
{
    const auto sc = sizeof(char);
    const auto n = sizeof(uint32_t)/sc;
    auto* b = reinterpret_cast<const unsigned char*>(&s);
    auto* e = b + sizeof(T)/(sc*n);

    std::cout << std::hex;
    for (auto* i = b; i != e; i += n)
    {
        for (auto j = 0; j < n; ++j)
            // For a big-endian machine n - 1 - j must be replaced by j
            std::cout << std::setw(sc*2) << std::setfill('0') << *(i + n - 1 - j);
        std::cout << ' ';
    }
    std::cout << std::dec;
}

int main()
{
    printStruct(test());
    return 0;
}

But the routine will print also alignment bytes and on a little-endian machine the two parts of an uint64_t will be reversed.

E.g. on my machine it prints

00000000 00000000 00000001 00000000 00000002 00007ffe

Where the first 00000000 is ab, the second 00000000 is alignment, 00000001 00000000 is cd, 00000002 is de and 00007ffe is alignment again.

  • That is undefined behavior (by violating strict aliasing). You are allowed to inspect objects via a (possibly unsigned) char*, but not through uint32_t*. Although you can easily get the same result by doing it that way. – Max Langhof Apr 16 at 7:11
  • @MaxLanghof, strictly speaking, you are right. But in this particular case I can't see what may be the source of the undefined behavior. And yes, one can print the same as sizeof(uint32_t)/sizeof(char) unsigned chars. – aparpara Apr 16 at 7:20
  • The source of undefined behavior is not fallowing a "shall" requirement by the C++ standard. Code having UB or not in this case in not negotiable I'm afraid. – StoryTeller Apr 16 at 7:23
  • Ok, let's pay tribute to the C++ standard "shall" :) – aparpara Apr 16 at 7:32
  • I prefer to pay tribute to portable programs that don't break when various sanitizers are ran on them, or compilers given free reign to optimize. But sure, let's be sarcastic. – StoryTeller Apr 16 at 7:36
0

One option would be to use std::tuple for your structures. e.g. your struct could be defined as:

typedef std::tuple< uint32_t, uint64_t, uint32_t > test;

You can then print any tuple using:

template<class Tuple, std::size_t N>
struct TuplePrinter {
    static void print(const Tuple& t)
    {
        TuplePrinter<Tuple, N - 1>::print(t);
        std::cout << ", " << std::get<N - 1>(t);
    }
};

template<class Tuple>
struct TuplePrinter<Tuple, 1> {
    static void print(const Tuple& t)
    {
        std::cout << std::get<0>(t);
    }
};

template<class... Args>
void print(const std::tuple<Args...>& t)
{
    std::cout << "(";
    TuplePrinter<decltype(t), sizeof...(Args)>::print(t);
    std::cout << ")\n";
}

If you want to get back your named members you could derive a struct from your tuple, something like this:

struct test : public std::tuple< uint32_t, uint64_t, uint32_t >
{
    typedef std::tuple< uint32_t, uint64_t, uint32_t > base;
    test()
    : base( 0, 1, 2 ),
      ab( std::get< 0 >( *this ) ),
      cd( std::get< 1 >( *this ) ),
      ef( std::get< 2 >( *this ) )
    {
    }
    uint32_t& ab;
    uint64_t& cd;
    uint32_t& ef;
};

or alternatively:

template<typename T>
void print(const T& t)
{
    print(t.tuple);
}

struct test
{
    uint32_t ab = 0;
    uint64_t cd = 1;
    uint32_t ef = 2;
    typedef std::tuple< uint32_t&, uint64_t&, uint32_t& > tuple_t;
    const tuple_t tuple = { ab, cd, ef };
};

or (as suggested by @Jarod42):

void print(const test& t)
{
    print(std::tie(t.ab, t.cd, t.ef));
}
  • I would do a little different, provide a method similar to auto as_tuple(test t) { return std::tie(t.ab, t.cd, t.ef); }. So you keep name member, and you don't have bigger structure. – Jarod42 Apr 16 at 10:26
  • @Jarod42 thanks, edited. – Alan Birtles Apr 16 at 10:52

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