48

I have the following Java code that uses a local class.

import java.util.Arrays;

public class X<T> {
    void m() {
        class Z {}

        for (Object o : Arrays.asList(1, 2, 3))
            if (o instanceof Z) {}
    }
}

It does not compile with the following error message:

X.java:8: error: illegal generic type for instanceof
            if (o instanceof Z) {}
                             ^
1 error

I understand that the local class Z inherits the generic type signature of X<T>, being an inner class. The same kind of compilation error appears in this example, where Z is not local, but still inner:

import java.util.Arrays;

public class X<T> {
    class Z {}

    void m() {
        for (Object o : Arrays.asList(1, 2, 3))
            if (o instanceof Z) {} // Compilation error
    }
}

It can be worked around either by making Z non-inner / static:

import java.util.Arrays;

public class X<T> {
    static class Z {}

    void m() {
        for (Object o : Arrays.asList(1, 2, 3))
            if (o instanceof Z) {} // Compiles now
    }
}

Or by qualifying X.Z:

import java.util.Arrays;

public class X<T> {
    class Z {}

    void m() {
        for (Object o : Arrays.asList(1, 2, 3)) {
            if (o instanceof X.Z) {}    // Compiles now
            if (o instanceof X<?>.Z) {} // Also
        }
    }
}

But how can I qualify a local class, or work around this limitation, without changing the local class itself?

  • I think this is a kind of compiler pathology. It's a strange way of telling you the type is not reifiable. It's even worse in Eclipse - it tells you "Use the form Z instead". – RealSkeptic Apr 16 at 8:57
  • 2
    @RealSkeptic: Eclipse's compiler message is just "unlucky" here. It is usually a helpful extra information. – Lukas Eder Apr 16 at 8:59
  • 2
    A corollary of this is that Z[] array = new Z[0]; is also illegal. – Andy Turner Apr 16 at 9:25
36

To me this seems to be an oversight or limitation in the Java language and I do not think it is possible.

The referenced type in an instanceof expression must be reifiable according to JLS 4.7, meaning that it must be expressed as a reifiable type by its fully qualified name. At the same time, JLS 6.7 states that local classes do not have a fully qualified name, they can therefore not be expressed as reifiable.

If you declare Z as generic, the instanceof operator treats Z as a raw type where all generic properties to it - in this case the enclosing class - are considered raw as well. (Similar to a generic methods of a raw type being considered as raw despite any generic signature. This is a measure to retain backwards compatiblity of type generification.) Since any raw type is reifiable, declaring Z to be generic will compile.

  • It's true, but curiously, it does allow it if Z itself is generic, despite the fact that you have no way to qualify it. – RealSkeptic Apr 16 at 8:58
  • "oversight" - You're here to pick a fight with the JLS designers, right? :) – Lukas Eder Apr 16 at 9:00
  • 5
    Generics were patched into the language and there are some corner cases such as class literals that were not properly covered. Nothing is perfect, I think there is a chance for an oversight. ;) – Rafael Winterhalter Apr 16 at 9:02
  • 1
    I extended my answer to explain why generification of Z does the trick. – Rafael Winterhalter Apr 16 at 9:02
  • @LukasEder I think oversight is right. It's sort of like this question: these cases could have been designed around, but they haven't been; I make no judgment as to whether they should have been. – Andy Turner Apr 16 at 9:13
26

A possible workaround is to use reflection:

import java.util.Arrays;

public class X<T> {
    void m() {
        class Z {}

        for (Object o : Arrays.asList(1, 2, 3))
            if (Z.class.isInstance(o)) {}
    }
}
5

Apparently, by making Z generic compilation succeeds. I expected that to require <T> as the type parameter, but you just have to make it generic, so anything will do

import java.util.Arrays;

public class X<T> {
    void m() {
        class Z<Anything> {}

        for (Object o : Arrays.asList(1, 2, 3))
            if (Z.class.isInstance(o)) {}
    }
}

Proper solution would be qualify the local class, but I don't think you can. Either you refactor it to a private static class or that's probably the best you can get.

  • 2
    Once you make Z generic, you don't need to apply the reflection workaround anymore... – Lukas Eder Apr 16 at 8:48
3

This should work either. Using reflection too. But seems a valid solution.

import java.util.Arrays;

public class X<T> {


    void m() {

        class Z2 {
        }

        for(Object o: Arrays.asList(1,2,3)) {
            if(Z2.class.isAssignableFrom(o.getClass())) {

            }
        }

    }

}
  • 1
    I didn't downvote, but I guess it's because there's a slightly better way to use reflection here, as I've mentioned in my own answer – Lukas Eder Apr 16 at 8:49

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