1

I need to inherit the Object A from Object B, were both the objects consist of constants only.

Example

 Object A {
  const val a1 = "some_data_1"
  const val a2 = "some_data_2"
 }

 Object B : A {
  const val b1 = "some_data_3"
 }

is it feasible to achieve this in kotlin ?

  • Whats your usecase? Why do you habe to write B.a1 ? Why not just A.a1 ? – Jonas Wilms Apr 16 at 11:49
2
 open class A {
    companion object {
        const val a1 = "some_data_1"
        const val a2 = "some_data_2"
    }
}

class B : A() {
    companion object {
        const val b1 = "some_data_3"
    }
    val a_1 = a1
    val a_2 = a2
}
  • This creates an unneccessary class though. – Jonas Wilms Apr 16 at 11:48
0

for a class to be inherited in Kotlin it should be open for example open class A {} for class B to extends class A should add the class B : A() for constants should be inside a companion object {}

0

Kotlin is an object-oriented programming (OOP) language. We can inherit object A from object B for that we have to to allow class "A" to be inherited, for that we need to attach the open modifier before the class to make it non-final.

For the const we have to use companion object, which is an object that is common to all instances of that class.

open class A {
     companion object {
        const val a1 = "some_data_1"
        const val a2 = "some_data_2"
     }
 }

class B : A() {
    companion object {
        const val b1 = "some_data_3"
    }
    val a_1 = a1
    val a_2 = a2
}

Check this link to understand inheritance

Check this link to understand Companion Object

0

I would probably dive a bit deeper. Object in your example is an Object Declaration. You should have a look at this doc describing Object Declarations and Object Expressions.

The question is - Why would you need to have one class only with constants extend another(also containing only const vals)?
Object Declarations are Kotlin built in Singletons and BTW are thread safe.
Example :

object DeviceProvider {


    private val _devices = ArrayList<Device>()

    fun getDevices() = _devices as List<Device>

    fun registerDevice(device: Device) {
        _devices.find { it == device } ?: _devices.add(device)
    }
}

Usage :

fun addDevice(){
    ServiceProvider.registerDevice(Device("1234"))
}

Object declarations are allowed to extend open classes and interfaces - so you can define a behavior or even a state via inheritance. As usual you can have a look at Kotlin docs about inheritance, those are exhaustive and nice read.
Still if we are talking about common approaches defining const values - then separate file is the best solution, if of course that value should be bound to any specific class. Here is a nice point of view(thanks Marko for your answer) :

In Java you're forced to put all static field and method declarations in a class and often you even have to create a class just for that purpose. Coming to Kotlin, many users look for the equivalent facility out of habit and end up overusing companion objects.

Kotlin completely decouples the notions of a file and a class. You can declare any number of public classes is the same file. You can also declare private top-level functions and variables and they'll be accessible only to the classes within the same file. This is a great way to organize closely associated code and data.

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