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I'm reading Advanced R by Hadley Wickham, trying to solve exercise 2 from section 2.3.6 about copy-on-modify:

Explain why tracemem() shows two copies when you run this code. Hint: carefully look at the difference between this code and the code shown earlier in the section.

x <- c(1L, 2L, 3L)
tracemem(x)

x[[3]] <- 4

(The previous code changed one element in a list of doubles to another double, yielding only one copy.)

In the Advanced R Solutions by Grosser and Bumann they explain that the second copy is due to type coercion, from integer to double. They do not define x as c(1L, 2L, 3L), but use x <- 1:3, which I thought was equivalent (comparing them using identical also returns TRUE). However, running the above code (on my end) only yields one copy, but running the following code yields two copies:

x <- 1:3
tracemem(x)

x[[3]] <- 4

Running this code also yields two copies:

x <- c(1L, 2L, 3L)
typeof(x)
tracemem(x)

x[[3]] <- 4

For example replacing typeof with class only yields one copy, but replacing it with mode or pryr::otype yields two copies. But simply printing x out instead yields one copy.

So what is the difference between c(1L, 2L, 3L) and 1:3, and why do calling some but not all of the above functions alter the behaviour?

I get the same behaviour running the code from PowerShell using Rterm and in the console in RStudio.

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  • Interesting, I even see different behaviors if I run the lines separately, so x <- c(1L, 2L, 3L); tracemem(x); x[[3]] <- 4 shows 1 copy but x <- c(1L, 2L, 3L); tracemem(x) -> Enter -> x[[3]] <- 4 shows 2.
    – Alexis
    Apr 16 '19 at 18:07
  • 2
    I think this might be related to the recent addition of ALTREP, which has performance benefits in lots of other contexts, but means that vectors like 1:3 are stored in a different "compact" form that reference only their start/end values.
    – joran
    Apr 16 '19 at 18:15
  • Yes, that probably explains that one, for the others I don't know.
    – Alexis
    Apr 16 '19 at 18:17
  • tbh, I'm a little thrown by the fact that I'm getting NAM(3) on all these objects. This is well outside my area of expertise, but I wonder if R has also updated it's NAMED system somehow that I've missed.
    – joran
    Apr 16 '19 at 18:20
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I found the answer in @brodieg's blog at https://www.brodieg.com/2019/02/18/an-unofficial-reference-for-internal-inspect/#fn4

Rather than use tracemem, go deeper with .Internal(inspect(x))

x <- c(1L, 6L, 10L)
.Internal(inspect(x))
#> @7fc0397e0f88 13 INTSXP g0c2 [NAM(1)] (len=3, tl=0) 1,6,10
x <- c(1L, 6L, 10L)
typeof(x)
.Internal(inspect(x))
#> @7fc0397e0f08 13 INTSXP g0c2 [NAM(7)] (len=3, tl=0) 1,6,10

The return value of .Internal(inspect(x)) is a pile of info, but the important bit is NAM. NAM is the reference counter, a way to determine how many R objects are pointing to the same underlying thing. Here typeof() incremented it. typeof() is a closure, and the “NAM” value on arguments to closures are always incremented.

Per @brodieg x won't always be copied when a new value is assigned to an element, but may when the NAM reference counting heuristic suggests there could be more than one reference to the object.

I couldn't find any info on references and :, but an object created with it automatically has a reference count > 1

x <- 1:3
.Internal(inspect(x))
#> @7fc03bad6388 13 INTSXP g0c0 [NAM(7)]  1 : 3 (compact)

So for the original situation with x <- c(1L, 6L, 10L), the reference count is only 1, and the R heuristics don't trigger a copy for the assignment, but do for the type coercion. That's why tracemem is only triggered once.

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