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I work with geophysical models and a common situation is needing to multiply, add, etc. 2D data with 3D data. Below is an example.

module benchmarks
  implicit none
  integer, parameter :: n=500
  integer :: k
  real :: d2(n,n)
  real :: d3(n,n,n)
  contains
  ! Iteration
  subroutine benchmark_a(res)
    real, intent(out) :: res(n,n,n)
    do k = 1, size(d3,3)
      res(:,:,k) = d2*d3(:,:,k)
    end do
  end subroutine
  ! Spread
  subroutine benchmark_b(res)
    real, intent(out) :: res(n,n,n)
    res = d3*spread(d2, 3, size(d3,3))
  end subroutine
end module

program main
  use benchmarks
  real :: t, tarray(2)
  real :: res(n,n,n)
  call random_number(d2)
  call random_number(d3)
  ! Iteration
  call dtime(tarray, t)
  call benchmark_a(res)
  call dtime(tarray, t)
  write(*,*) 'Iteration', t
  ! Spread
  call dtime(tarray, t)
  call benchmark_b(res)
  call dtime(tarray, t)
  write(*,*) 'Spread', t
end program

When I run this with varying dimension size n, I generally find spread is much much slower; for example:

Spread   2.09942889
Iteration  0.458283991

Does anyone know why the spread approach rather than an explicit for loop (which I thought were, generally, to be avoided at all costs) is so much slower?

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  • 1
    How do you know you're actually timing the operation? Your example doesn't use res, so a compiler might evaporate the loop. It might find it easier to do so for the DO loop than the use of SPREAD. Indeed, when I try your code with ifort, it completely removes BOTH the SPREAD and the DO loop. Apr 17, 2019 at 0:14
  • How can I improve the benchmark then? Maybe print res, or add zero to it or perform some similar dummy operation? Btw I am just compiling with gfortran.
    – Luke Davis
    Apr 17, 2019 at 0:16
  • Check my edit. I put the two examples in separate subroutines, each of which returns the result. The timing does not change.
    – Luke Davis
    Apr 17, 2019 at 0:27
  • When speaking about performance you should always indicate the compiler in the question. When dealiing with intrinsic functions it is even more importan. I added the tag, but you should also indicate the compiller version (in the question, not comments). There is no performance of Fortran, always of individual compilers. Apr 17, 2019 at 5:07
  • Your revised example still doesn't actually use res. Putting the subroutine in a separate module doesn't block optimization if it is still in the same source file. I modified the source slightly to print the value of one of the elements of res in the main program, compiled with ifort I get zero times for both versions. Examination of the assembly tells me that ifort did the SPREAD inline in a manner very close to the DO loop. So really your question seems to be why doesn't gfortran optimize SPREAD the way it does the loop - nothing to do with SPREAD itself. Apr 17, 2019 at 14:03

1 Answer 1

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The basic answer here is "it isn't". Maybe with a specific compiler and specific circumstances, the intrinsic isn't as well-optimized as an explicit DO loop, but it doesn't have to be that way. I tested with ifort 19, and even at default optimization levels, the SPREAD intrinsic and the explicit loop generated similar code, with the intrinsic being faster when I correct the program to use the result.

Iteration 0.2187500 0.1376885 Spread 9.3750000E-02 0.1376885

I would also caution (as I did in the comments to your question) that simplistic benchmark programs often don't measure what the author thinks they do. The most common error, which your original and revised examples both exhibit, is that the result of the work-under-test is never used so a sufficiently clever compiler can simply evaporate the entire operation. Indeed when I build both your test cases with ifort 19, the compiler completely removes all the work leaving only the timing code. Needless to say, that runs pretty fast.

  implicit none
  integer, parameter :: n=500
  integer :: k
  real :: d2(n,n)
  real :: d3(n,n,n)
  contains
  ! Iteration
  subroutine benchmark_a(res)
    real, intent(out) :: res(n,n,n)
    do k = 1, size(d3,3)
      res(:,:,k) = d2*d3(:,:,k)
    end do
  end subroutine
  ! Spread
  subroutine benchmark_b(res)
    real, intent(out) :: res(n,n,n)
    res = d3*spread(d2, 3, size(d3,3))
  end subroutine
end module

program main
  use benchmarks
  real :: tstart,tend
  real :: res(n,n,n)
  call random_number(d2)
  call random_number(d3)
  ! Iteration
  call cpu_time(tstart)
  call benchmark_a(res)
  call cpu_time(tend)
  write(*,*) 'Iteration', tend-tstart, res(10,10,10)
  ! Spread
  call cpu_time(tstart)
  call benchmark_b(res)
  call cpu_time(tend)
  write(*,*) 'Spread', tend-tstart, res(10,10,10)
end program```
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  • Thanks! I should have realized that performance was compiler dependent; really just starting to work with low-level languages. Can you try again adding the test? AFAIK you just have to surround the text with triple backticks. I tried just printing res but the code is still evaporated with pgf90. Also what are those second numbers 0.1376885 in your example?
    – Luke Davis
    Apr 17, 2019 at 19:20
  • Actually it seems that even when writing to a file with open(1, file='data.dat'), write(1,*) res before calling dtime the second time, I still get "zero" elapsed time with pgf90 even though I am waiting a few seconds in real-time for the program to finish running. Perhaps this could be a pgi-specific thing?
    – Luke Davis
    Apr 17, 2019 at 19:31
  • I swapped out dtime for CPU_TIME and got reasonable numbers. I was also getting zero dtime values. dtime is nonstandard and may vary in behavior across implementations. I know how to do the formatting, but it's not taking. The second number is just the value of res(10,10,10) - something to force the compiler to perform the operation. Ah, got the edit now. Apr 18, 2019 at 0:45
  • Great, thanks! Good to know spread is generally faster... but I guess it depends a lot on size and available memory; the question is whether it is faster to create a temporary tiled array (i.e. "broadcast" it) then perform a single vectorized binary operation, or avoid creating the temporary array but have to run a series of binary operations. Perhaps there is a cross-over point somewhere. Will run more tests.
    – Luke Davis
    Apr 18, 2019 at 13:58

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