1

I am a beginner coder and am having trouble understanding the input/output of nested for-loops for multiple lists (or vectors) in R. I'm sure this has been answered elsewhere (if so, please provide a link), but I cannot find a good answer on the web and it would be helpful for me (and I'm sure other beginner coders/R-users) to have it explained in simple terms.

Specifically, I would like to know how to properly index list elements in order to make a condition based some relationship between both lists, then have the elements of one list meeting this condition added to a new list.

To put it another way, I would like to iterate thru each element in list 'a', check if it is == to any/all of the elements in list 'b' and, if TRUE, add the list 'a' element to the new list 'c'.

This is a simplified example of what I've tried:

a <- as.list(c(1,2,3,11,12))
b <- as.list(c(1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10))

c <- list()
index <- 1
for (i in 1:length(a)){
  for (j in 1:length(b)){
    if (a[[i]] == b[[j]]) next 
      c[[index]] <- a[[i]]
      index <- index + 1
    }}

The result is a list with 47 elements. The result I am trying for is the following:

c
[[1]]
[1] 1

[[2]]
[1] 2

[[3]]
[1] 3

What is wrong with how I have indexed elements in the loop?

2 Answers 2

1

Simply put,

if (condition) next 

means that if condition is TRUE then do nothing and move on to the next loop.

if (condition) {action}

means that if condition is TRUE then execute action.

change it to

a <- as.list(c(1,2,3,11,12))
b <- as.list(c(1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10))

c <- list()
index <- 1
for (i in 1:length(a)){
  for (j in 1:length(b)){
    if (a[[i]] == b[[j]]) {
      c[[index]] <- a[[i]]
      index <- index + 1
    }}}

then it would work

1

Instead of the double for-loop you might use %in%

a[a %in% b]
#[[1]]
#[1] 1
#
#[[2]]
#[1] 2
#
#[[3]]
#[1] 3
6
  • OK, but what if I want to write a more complex condition than just == elements? Hoping for a more general solution to which other condition functions can be substituted.
    – Dorothy
    Commented Apr 17, 2019 at 20:58
  • @Dorothy I can only answer based on the example data you provide and the expected output you showed. However, a double for-loop is usually not the best option.
    – markus
    Commented Apr 17, 2019 at 21:01
  • What should I look into for writing a condition based on the comparison of two lists if not a double for-loop?
    – Dorothy
    Commented Apr 17, 2019 at 21:04
  • What is your ultimate goal?
    – markus
    Commented Apr 17, 2019 at 21:05
  • I use this type of comparison lots for many reasons, and I mostly deal with spatial data using the sp package. So, for example, I want to see whether each element in a list of spatial points intersects with each elements in a list of spatial polygons, and if TRUE, add those spatial points to a new list.
    – Dorothy
    Commented Apr 17, 2019 at 21:10

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