18

I want a way to exit a begin/end block while still assigning the variable that its result is assigned to.

def foo
  @foo ||= begin
    puts "running"

    return "leaving early" if true # would be some sort of calculation

    # Other calculations
  end
end

What I hope to happen

> foo
running
=> leaving early
> foo
=> leaving early

What actually happens

> foo
running
=> leaving early
> foo
running
=> leaving early

The code doesn't work because return exits the entire method without setting @foo. Using break or next only work in loops. Does anything work within a begin block the way I'm thinking?

Current ways I can do it but was hoping to avoid:

  • Assigning the variable within the begin block and returning
  • Putting the remaining portion of the begin block in an if statement
  • Performing the calculation before the begin block

There seem to be a lot of related questions about breaking out of blocks but I couldn't find one that answers this specific version (maybe because it's not possible).

3
  • I don't understand why you didn't get a void value exception SyntaxError. That occurs when the parser is unable to determine how a value would be assigned, here caused by the return statement (even if it had been return "leaving early" if false). That's what I got with v2.6.1. What Ruby version are you using? Commented Apr 17, 2019 at 22:38
  • @CarySwoveland Good catch. Looks like it works if you have something after the return, like a puts "finished" or just some value to return
    – Tom Prats
    Commented Apr 18, 2019 at 16:48
  • Yes, but it's still weird. Commented Apr 18, 2019 at 23:21

3 Answers 3

22

I think you're going to save yourself a whole heck of a lot of strife if you just put all that logic into its own method:

def foo
  @foo ||= compute_foo
end

def compute_foo
  puts "running"

  return "leaving early" if true # would be some sort of calculation

  # Other calculations
end

This decouples the computation from the memoization, making it easier to test and reason about, and it's a fairly common design pattern in Ruby and other languages.

Of course, there are ways of doing what you're asking. The most obvious solution being an immediately-invoked anonymous proc:

def foo
  @foo ||= (proc do
    puts "running"

    next "leaving early" if true # would be some sort of calculation

    # Other calculations
  end)[] # or .call or .()
end

But you certainly wouldn't be doing yourself or any future maintainers of this code any favors.

6
  • That's some great insight. Using another method makes a lot of sense here, but having the option to use a anonymous proc is an interesting possibility
    – Tom Prats
    Commented Apr 17, 2019 at 21:26
  • 3
    This is good advice but it doesn't answer the question: "Does anything work within a begin block the way I'm thinking?". Commented Apr 18, 2019 at 23:20
  • @CarySwoveland I believe I've answered it implicitly, but here's the answer explicitly: No, not to the best of my knowledge.
    – mwp
    Commented Apr 18, 2019 at 23:38
  • The OP has answered that question in the affirmative in a recent comment on the question, though we agree it's not good coding practice Commented Apr 19, 2019 at 0:00
  • @CarySwoveland That solves the SyntaxError, but it doesn't actually solve the problem.
    – mwp
    Commented Apr 19, 2019 at 0:06
0

You can use loop do ... end construction instead of begin ... end
In this case you can use break <value> to return value from the block.

def foo
  @foo ||= loop do
     puts "running"

     break "leaving early" if true # would be some sort of calculation

     # Other calculations
     break "leaving at the end"
  end
end

This will give you result you expected:

> foo
running
=> leaving early
> foo
=> leaving early
0

No, you can't do it inside a begin/end block,
Syntax errors were raised on both next and break.

Other than loop, another alternative is tap, it returns it's (mutated) self.
Like begin, break also breaks tap, but next won't.

> true_bar = Bar.new
=> #<Bar:0x00007f9dfdadcb20 @is_really_true=true>
> 
> true_bar.foo
running
=> "leaving early"
> 
> true_bar.foo
=> "leaving early"
> 
> false_bar = Bar.new.not_really
=> #<Bar:0x00007f9dfdce9300 @is_really_true=false>
> 
> false_bar.foo
running
run more
=> "leave at the end"
> 
> false_bar.foo
=> "leave at the end"

source:

class Bar
  def initialize; @really_true = true; end

  def foo
    @foo ||= "".tap do |respond|
      puts 'running'

      next respond << 'leaving early' if really_true?

      respond << 'leave at the end'
      puts 'run more'
    end
  end

  def not_really
    self.tap { @really_true = false }
  end

  def really_true?; @really_true; end
end

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