7

I have a Search action in an ASP.NET MVC 3 app that returns suggestions containing and suggestions tagged with the given keywords:

[HttpPost]
public ActionResult Search(string query, int pg = 0)
{
    var keywords = query.Split(new[] { ' ', ',', ';' }, 
        StringSplitOptions.RemoveEmptyEntries);

    var containing = (from s in _readonlySession.All<Suggestion>()
                      from k in keywords
                      where (s.Text.ToLower().Contains(k.ToLower()))
                      orderby s.Text
                      select s).Distinct();

    var tagged = (from t in _readonlySession.All<Tag>()
                  from s in t.Suggestions
                  from k in keywords
                  where t.Text.ToLower().Contains(k.ToLower())
                  orderby s.Text
                  select s).Distinct();

    var model = new SearchViewModel
    {
        Query = query,
        Containing = containing.ToList(),
        Tagged = tagged.ToList()
    };

    return View(model);
}

I think the containing and tagged queries could be perfectly run in parallel.

What is the best way to fire these two queries at the same time, wait for the results, and return only when both queries are completed?

8

The Task Parallels Library is your best option. Plenty of information via Google, but below is what your implementation might look like.

[HttpPost]
public ActionResult Search(string query, int pg = 0)
{
    var keywords = query.Split(new[] { ' ', ',', ';' }, 
        StringSplitOptions.RemoveEmptyEntries);

    IEnumerable containing=null;
    Task t1 = Task.Factory.StartNew(() =>
    {
        containing = (from s in _readonlySession.All<Suggestion>()
                        from k in keywords
                        where (s.Text.ToLower().Contains(k.ToLower()))
                        orderby s.Text
                        select s).Distinct().ToList();

    });

    IEnumerable tagged=null;
    Task t2 = Task.Factory.StartNew(() =>
    {
        var tagged = (from t in _readonlySession.All<Tag>()
                        from s in t.Suggestions
                        from k in keywords
                        where t.Text.ToLower().Contains(k.ToLower())
                        orderby s.Text
                        select s).Distinct().ToList();
    });

    t1.Wait();
    t2.Wait();

    var model = new SearchViewModel
    {
        Query = query,
        Containing = containing.ToList(),
        Tagged = tagged.ToList()
    };

    return View(model);
}

Bear in mind that if your application gets a lot of requests, you may be better off not performing your queries asynchronously - consuming 2 extra threads to service one request takes resources away from other incoming requests. This will only be an issue if you have a huge volume of traffic, or if your hardware is inadequate.

  • 2
    Using the array overload of Parallel.Invoke with a () => { ... } lambda could achieve much the same effect with much less code. – Will Dean Apr 17 '11 at 20:21
3

You want to be careful using the TPL from within a web page as the TPL will utilize threads that would otherwise be used servicing other HTTP requests. Essentially you can trade off lower response latency on individual requests against reduced overall throughput of requests.

See the following post for more explanation of the tradeoffs:

http://blogs.msdn.com/b/pfxteam/archive/2010/02/08/9960003.aspx

  • This is an issue with threading in general, not just TPL. – Greg Sansom Apr 7 '11 at 4:14
2

That may be a good candidate for an async controller. The important thing about async controllers is that if you want to have a net performance gain in this case you need to modify your repository layer and provide asynchronous versions of the two methods which ideally use I/O Completion ports when communicating with remote systems such as a database.

public class SearchController: AsyncController
{
    public void SearchAsync(string query, int pg = 0)
    {
        // TODO: Write a custom model binder to do this job
        // and have your controller action directly take an
        // IEnumerable<string> argument.
        var keywords = query.Split(new[] { ' ', ',', ';' }, 
            StringSplitOptions.RemoveEmptyEntries);

        AsyncManager.OutstandingOperations.Increment();
        AsyncManager.OutstandingOperations.Increment();

        _readonlySession.GetContainingCompleted += (sender, e) =>
        {
            AsyncManager.Parameters["containing"] = e.Value;
            AsyncManager.OutstandingOperations.Decrement();
        };

        _readonlySession.GetTaggedCompleted += (sender, e) =>
        {
            AsyncManager.Parameters["tagged"] = e.Value;
            AsyncManager.OutstandingOperations.Decrement();
        };

        _readonlySession.GetContainingAsync(keywords);
        _readonlySession.GetTaggedAsync(keywords);

        AsyncManager.Parameters["query"] = query;
    }

    public ActionResult SearchCompleted(string query, IEnumerable<Suggestion> containing, IEnumerable<Tag> tagged)
    {
        var model = new SearchViewModel
        {
            Query = query,
            Containing = containing.ToList(),
            Tagged = tagged.ToList()
        };
        return View(model);
    }
}
  • If I implement it as an AsyncController, would I be facing the same issues as with the TPL that @Greg Samson mentions in his answer, namely, that if the "application gets a lot of requests, you may be better off not performing your queries asynchronously"? – Sergi Papaseit Apr 7 '11 at 10:38
  • @Sergi Papaseit, that will depend. If you implement I/O Completion ports effectively you will have a net gain in performance. I would recommend you reading the following article: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/magazine/cc163725.aspx. In any cases you should be doing extensive performance tests. – Darin Dimitrov Apr 7 '11 at 11:13

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