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I was reading about local functions introduced recently and started to wonder about the question. Afaik local variables of value types in lambdas are allocated in the heap. Also there was something that local function have advantage over lambdas when capturing value types, which do not require in this case additional heap allocation. Still following is not clear to me:

  1. Are local value type variables declared in local functions allocated on stack?
  2. What about value type variables, that are declared in "parent" function and captured in local function?

(provided that parent is not anonymous itself).

edit:

int ParentFunction ()
{
    int parentVarLambda = 0;
    int parentVarLocal = 0;

    Func<int> lamdaFuncion = () => parentVarLambda + 1;

    int a = lamdaFuncion();
    int b = LocalFunction();

    return a + b;

    int LocalFunction()
    {
        int localFuncVar = 1;
        return parentVarLocal += localFuncVar ;
    }
}

where will be parentVarLambda, parentVarLocal and localFuncVar allocated?

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  • 3
    @jdweng: That's not true at all. – Jon Skeet Apr 18 '19 at 10:38
  • 4
    "Afaik local variables of value types in lambdas are allocated in the heap" - no, they're not. Local variables which are captured by lambda expressions have to be heap-allocated as they persist across multiple delegate invocations, but that's not the same as local variables declared in the lambda expressions. If you could give more concrete examples of what you're interested in (as code) it'll be easier to help you. – Jon Skeet Apr 18 '19 at 10:40
  • 4
    @jdweng: "All runtime objects have to be allocated into a stack" No, they really don't. – Jon Skeet Apr 18 '19 at 12:01
  • 5
    @jdweng: Then you should be aware that that is a) inaccurate; b) not the way anyone else uses the term, and therefore unhelpful on Stack Overflow. – Jon Skeet Apr 18 '19 at 13:53
  • 5
    @jdweng: It's not a stack - there's no "push" and "pop" operation on the heap. That's not Microsoft terminology - it's simple computer science. (I would agree that it's not a regular computer science heap either, but the use of heap there isn't MS-specific either.) And even if this were technically correct in the most fiddly way, it's obviously not what the OP is talking about: they're talking about heap allocation vs stack allocation. Why not try to communicate with people in the terms that everyone actually uses? – Jon Skeet Apr 18 '19 at 14:11
5

None of it is heap-allocated, unless something else is going on (particularly if the compiler can't guarantee that the lifetime of variables captured by the local function don't exceed the lifetime of the parent method, e.g. if a delegate refers to the local function, or the local function contains yield return or await statements).

Let's say you have:

public void M(int i) {
    Inner(i + 1);

    void Inner(int x)
    {
        int j = x + i;
        Console.WriteLine(j);   
    }
}

Using the wonderful SharpLab, we can see this gets compiled to:

[StructLayout(LayoutKind.Auto)]
[CompilerGenerated]
private struct <>c__DisplayClass0_0
{
    public int i;
}

public void M(int i)
{
    <>c__DisplayClass0_0 <>c__DisplayClass0_ = default(<>c__DisplayClass0_0);
    <>c__DisplayClass0_.i = i;
    <M>g__Inner|0_0(<>c__DisplayClass0_.i + 1, ref <>c__DisplayClass0_);
}

[CompilerGenerated]
internal static void <M>g__Inner|0_0(int x, ref <>c__DisplayClass0_0 P_1)
{
    Console.WriteLine(x + P_1.i);
}

So the compiler's taken our inner function, and rewritten it as a static method. Parameters to the inner function remain as parameters to the static method. Things captured by the inner function end up as fields on a compiler-generated struct, which is passed by ref (to avoid copying, and so that changes made to it in the static method are reflected in the calling method).

Structs allocated in that inner function will just be allocated the same in the static method - i.e. on the stack.


Now let's compare that to equivalent code, but using a delegate:

public void M(int i) {
    Action<int> inner = x =>
    {
        int j = x + i;
        Console.WriteLine(j);   
    };

    inner(i + 1);
}

This gets compiled to:

[CompilerGenerated]
private sealed class <>c__DisplayClass0_0
{
    public int i;

    internal void <M>b__0(int x)
    {
        Console.WriteLine(x + i);
    }
}

public void M(int i)
{
    <>c__DisplayClass0_0 <>c__DisplayClass0_ = new <>c__DisplayClass0_0();
    <>c__DisplayClass0_.i = i;
    new Action<int>(<>c__DisplayClass0_.<M>b__0)(<>c__DisplayClass0_.i + 1);
}

Here we can see the difference. The compiler's generated a new class, which has fields to hold the variables captured by the delegate, and has a method on it which contains the body of our delegate. It's had to use a class, rather than a struct passed by reference.

To understand why, think about the fact that your code can pass a delegate around - it could store it in a field, or return it, or pass it to another method. In that case, it's not just being synchronously called by its parent (as a local function must be), but it has to instead carry around the variables it captured with it.


Note that something similar happens if we create a delegate referring to a local function:

public void M(int i) {
    void Inner(int x)
    {
        int j = x + i;
        Console.WriteLine(j);   
    }

    Action<int> inner = Inner;
    inner(i + 1);
}

This gets compiled to the same as before:

[CompilerGenerated]
private sealed class <>c__DisplayClass0_0
{
    public int i;

    internal void <M>g__Inner|0(int x)
    {
        Console.WriteLine(x + i);
    }
}

public void M(int i)
{
    <>c__DisplayClass0_0 <>c__DisplayClass0_ = new <>c__DisplayClass0_0();
    <>c__DisplayClass0_.i = i;
    new Action<int>(<>c__DisplayClass0_.<M>g__Inner|0)(<>c__DisplayClass0_.i + 1);
}

Here, the compiler's spotted that it needs to create the delegate anyway, so it generates the same code as in the previous example.

Note that there are other cases where the compiler has to perform heap allocations when calling a local function, such as if the local function has to be resumable because it contains yield return or await statements.


To address the specific example in your edit:

int ParentFunction ()
{
    int parentVarLambda = 0;
    int parentVarLocal = 0;

    Func<int> lamdaFuncion = () => parentVarLambda + 1;

    int a = lamdaFuncion();
    int b = LocalFunction();

    return a + b;

    int LocalFunction()
    {
        int localVar = 1;
        return parentVarLocal += localVar;
    }
}

We can again put this into SharpLab, and get:

[CompilerGenerated]
private sealed class <>c__DisplayClass0_0
{
    public int parentVarLambda;

    public int parentVarLocal;

    internal int <ParentFunction>b__0()
    {
        return parentVarLambda + 1;
    }

    internal int <ParentFunction>g__LocalFunction|1()
    {
        int num = 1;
        return parentVarLocal += num;
    }
}

private int ParentFunction()
{
    <>c__DisplayClass0_0 <>c__DisplayClass0_ = new <>c__DisplayClass0_0();
    <>c__DisplayClass0_.parentVarLambda = 0;
    <>c__DisplayClass0_.parentVarLocal = 0;
    int num = new Func<int>(<>c__DisplayClass0_.<ParentFunction>b__0)();
    int num2 = <>c__DisplayClass0_.<ParentFunction>g__LocalFunction|1();
    return num + num2;
}

Note that the compiler's realised that it had to create a new instance of a generated class for the delegate anyway, so it's just opted to deal with the local function in the same way at no extra cost. It doesn't make much difference in this case, but this technique is needed where the delegate and the local function capture the same variables - they need to be hoisted into the same generated class.

Because of this, both parentVarLambda and parentVarLocal were allocated on the same compiler-generated class, and localFuncVar just got optimized away (but would have been allocated on the stack in <ParentFunction>g__LocalFunction|1()).

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    Except that's not always the case. Try adding Action<int> action = Inner; as another line of your method... – Jon Skeet Apr 18 '19 at 10:41
  • @JonSkeet Good point, thanks! I was going to contrast local functions with the code generated for delegates anyway, so tying the two together at the end makes sense. – canton7 Apr 18 '19 at 10:47
  • This also happens in other cases where the compiler can't control the lifetime, e.g. if it's an iterator or an async method. – Jon Skeet Apr 18 '19 at 12:02
  • Yep, a comment to that effect is at the end of the 3rd section (hidden in the noise, granted). I'll repeat it at the start. – canton7 Apr 18 '19 at 12:04

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