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I would like to sort a 2x2 numpy array by the x coordinates. My goal is to obtain an array sorted from the smallest X value to the highest inside each couple of points and, at the same time, using all the value of the array

The array has been created using this line of code:

rect = np.empty((4, 2, 2))

The actual output of value inside array is:

[[[ -1000 , 97 ] #x0,y0 rect 0
   [999 , 98]]   #x1,y1 rect 0
  [[410 , -1048] #x0,y0 rect 1
   [619 , 940]]  #x1,y1 rect 1
  [[-1000, 226] 
   [999 , 227]]
  [[229 , -983]
   [55 , 1008]]]

The desire output is to sort by the smallest value of X inside each couple of points that form a rect and then, sort by the X considering all the rect like this:

 [[[ -1000 , 97 ] 
   [999 , 98]] 
  [[-1000, 226] 
   [999 , 227]]
  [[55 , 1008]
   [229 , -983]]
  [[410 , -1048] 
   [619 , 940]]]
3
  • Are the arrays you eventually want to perform this on going to be large, so that it would pay off to use a pure Numpy solution? I.e. are you going to have something like np.empty((n, 2, 2)) with n >= 1000 or larger? – blubberdiblub Apr 18 '19 at 15:05
  • I suppose that n will not be higher than 100. Right now is 35 @blubberdiblub – Minez97 Apr 18 '19 at 15:11
  • Are you sure your accepted answer that works? It does not work to me – Martin Apr 18 '19 at 16:02
2

Goodbye loops and lambdas, welcome speed

import numpy as np 

original_array = np.array([[[ -1000 , 97 ],[999 , 98]],
               [[410 , -1048],[619 , 940]],  #original_array1,y1 rect 1
                [[-1000, 226],[999 , 227]],
                [[229 , -983],[55 , 1008]]])

#get indices of sorted x0 and x1 (0 means first element of both arrays)
# indices are 2 arrays - [0,0,0,1], [1,1,1,0],
# so you can see that last element needs to reposition
indices = np.argsort(original_array[:,:,0],axis=1)

#create new array
new = np.empty(shape=[4,2,2])

#move on correct posisitions sub arrays
#np.arange only create artifical indices for each rect
new[:,0,:]=original_array[np.arange(original_array.shape[0]),indices[:,0],:]
new[:,1,:]=original_array[np.arange(original_array.shape[0]),indices[:,1],:]

#When subarrays are sorted, sort parent arrays
final_sorted_array = new[new[:,0,0].argsort(),:,:]
print(final_sorted_array)



 [[[-1000.    97.]
  [  999.    98.]]

 [[-1000.   226.]
  [  999.   227.]]

 [[   55.  1008.]
  [  229.  -983.]]

 [[  410. -1048.]
  [  619.   940.]]]
4
  • Good thinking with the first argsort, unfortunately this is still missing the second sort step. I incorporated the faster sort for the first step into my answer. – BookYourLuck Apr 18 '19 at 16:45
  • There is something missing? It seems to me, that it sorts what question demands. In fact, its exactly as expected output from the questioner – Martin Apr 18 '19 at 18:12
  • @BookYourLuck Btw, its ok if you get inspired by my answer, but if you integrate it in your own answer, it would be good, to give some reference. Otherwise its kind of stealing – Martin Apr 18 '19 at 18:15
  • the original answer required new[:, :, 0] to be sorted, i.e. new[:, :, 0] == [-1000, -1000, 55, 410]. Your answer gives new[:, :, 0] == [-1000, 410, -1000, 55]. – BookYourLuck Apr 18 '19 at 18:32
3

If you want to do it without creating additional copies of the array, you can do it using a combination of argsort and indexing.

import numpy as np
data = np.array(
 [[[ -1000 , 97 ],
   [999 , 98]],
  [[410 , -1048],
   [619 , 940]],
  [[-1000, 226] ,
   [999 , 227]],
  [[229 , -983],
   [55 , 1008]]])
def sortrect(rect):
    x = rect[:, 0]
    idx = np.argsort(x)
    rect[:] = rect[idx]

for a in data:
    sortrect(a)

minx = data[:, 0, 0]
idx = np.argsort(minx)
data[:] = data[idx]

The same thing, without loops but less pedagogical (kudos to Martin for the argsort with axis):

idx0 = np.arange(data.shape[0])[:, np.newaxis]
idx1 = np.argsort(data[:, :, 0], axis=1)
data = data[idx0, idx1]

minx = data[:, 0, 0]
idx = np.argsort(minx)
data[:] = data[idx]

An expression of the form out = data[idx0, idx1] means

for all i, j:
    out[i, j] = data[idx0[i, j], idx1[i, j]].

See https://docs.scipy.org/doc/numpy/reference/arrays.indexing.html#integer-array-indexing for further details.

2
  • Is it worthy to modify my answer and add it to yours without referencing me? On one side, I am flattered, because it obviously means my answer is better than yours, on the other side, I dont like this kind of behaviour and I am not satisfied. – Martin Apr 18 '19 at 18:22
  • 1
    Here you go, no bad intentions. – BookYourLuck Apr 18 '19 at 18:29
0

You can use the key parameter of the sort function for this:

l = [[[ -1000 , 97 ],[999 , 98]],
     [[410 , -1048], [619 , 940]],
     [[-1000, 226],[999 , 227]],
     [[229 , -983],[55 , 1008]]]
sorted(l, key=lambda x: (min(x[0][0], x[1][0]), max(x[0][0],x[1][0])))
>>> [[[-1000, 97],  [999, 98]],
     [[-1000, 226], [999, 227]],
     [[229, -983],  [55, 1008]],
     [[410, -1048], [619, 940]]]

The lambda inside the sorted creates a tuple containing minimum and maximum value of x

And if you are working with Numpy, you can write something that generalize better in higher dimensions:

sorted(l, key=lambda x: sorted(x[..., 0]))
>>> [array([[-1000,    97], [  999,    98]]), 
    array([[-1000,   226], [  999,   227]]), 
    array([[ 229, -983], [  55, 1008]]), 
    array([[  410, -1048], [  619,   940]])]

This one works even if you have more than 2 points for defining your shape and will sort by minimum x value

EDIT: Correction to sort inner points inside a rectangle:

sorted(np.sort(l, axis=1), key=lambda x: tuple(x[..., 0]))
2
  • Thanks for you help and explanation but I need to sort also inside each pair of points and this [ 229, -983], [ 55, 1008] (third output line) is not the output that I want. The output I was searching for is [ 55, 1008], [ 229, -983] – Minez97 Apr 18 '19 at 15:16
  • Then pick BookYourLuck's answer as it is the correct one. âńōŋŷXmoůŜ does not give the correct answer neither. – pLOPeGG Apr 18 '19 at 15:29

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