7

I am writing an Android application with Xamarin.Android, but an answer in native Android would be appreciated as well. In my Android application, I have a BLE Write Characteristic that devices can write to. It works, but I can't send more than 20 bytes, the rest gets cut off. My code to create and add the service/characteristic:

BluetoothGattService service = new BluetoothGattService(Java.Util.UUID.FromString(MyServiceUuid), GattServiceType.Primary);

// write characteristic (write-only, supports subscriptions)
BluetoothGattCharacteristic writeCharacteristic = new BluetoothGattCharacteristic(Java.Util.UUID.FromString(MyCharacteristicUuid), GattProperty.WriteNoResponse | GattProperty.Notify, GattPermission.Write);

service.AddCharacteristic(writeCharacteristic);

_bluetoothGattServer.AddService(service);

My code for on the side that writes to the characteristic:

public override void OnServicesDiscovered(BluetoothGatt gatt, [GeneratedEnum] GattStatus status)
{
    base.OnServicesDiscovered(gatt, status);

    characteristic = gatt.GetService(Java.Util.UUID.FromString(MyServiceUuid))
                         .GetCharacteristic(Java.Util.UUID.FromString(MyCharacteristicUuid));

    if(characteristic.Properties.HasFlag(GattProperty.WriteNoResponse))
    {
        Log?.Invoke("writing characteristic...");

        characteristic.SetValue(MyVeryLongString);
        characteristic.WriteType = GattWriteType.NoResponse;
        gatt.WriteCharacteristic(characteristic);
    }
}

And on the side that accepts the write request:

public override void OnCharacteristicWriteRequest(BluetoothDevice device, int requestId, BluetoothGattCharacteristic characteristic, bool preparedWrite, bool responseNeeded, int offset, byte[] value)
{
    base.OnCharacteristicWriteRequest(device, requestId, characteristic, preparedWrite, responseNeeded, offset, value);

    Log?.Invoke("OnCharacteristicWriteRequest");

    string data = System.Text.Encoding.UTF8.GetString(value);

    Log?.Invoke(data);

    if(responseNeeded)
    {
        BluetoothGattServer.SendResponse(device, requestId, GattStatus.Success, 0, Encoding.ASCII.GetBytes("ok"));
    }
}

I see there is an offset, but this function only gets called once. I must be missing something on one side?

The funny thing is, that when I test this Android application with the iOS version of my application, I do not have this issue. I only have this issue when both devices are Androids.

EDIT

My new implementation of OnCharacteristicWriteRequest:

public override void OnCharacteristicWriteRequest(BluetoothDevice device, int requestId, BluetoothGattCharacteristic characteristic, bool preparedWrite, bool responseNeeded, int offset, byte[] value)
{
    base.OnCharacteristicWriteRequest(device, requestId, characteristic, preparedWrite, responseNeeded, offset, value);

    Log?.Invoke("OnCharacteristicWriteRequest");

    string data = System.Text.Encoding.UTF8.GetString(value);

    Log?.Invoke(data);

    Guid characteristicId = new Guid(characteristic.Uuid.ToString());
    var record = _writeCharacteristicsReceived.FirstOrDefault(c => c.DeviceAddress == device.Address && c.CharacteristicId == characteristicId);

    if(record != null)
    {
        record.Data += data;
    }
    else
    {
        record = new CharacteristicWriteReceived()
        {
            CharacteristicId = characteristicId,
            DeviceAddress = device.Address,
            Data = data
        };

        _writeCharacteristicsReceived.Add(record);
    }

    if (record?.Data.EndsWith(Constants.WriteCharacteristicEndDelimiter) == true)
    {
        _writeCharacteristicsReceived.Remove(record);
        record.Data = record.Data.Substring(0, record.Data.Length - Constants.WriteCharacteristicEndDelimiter.Length); // remove the end delimeter
        Log?.Invoke(record.Data);

        OnCharacteristicWriteReceived?.Invoke(record);
    }

    if (responseNeeded)
    {
        BluetoothGattServer.SendResponse(device, requestId, GattStatus.Success, offset, value);
    }
}
3
  • This is limited by Android in 20 bytes for fitting the almost android devices .If need over 20 bytes , need some custom Configuration in android. Apr 22, 2019 at 7:33
  • But then why am I able to do a "long write" with Android to iOS and Windows?
    – Drake
    Apr 23, 2019 at 15:05
  • Or maybe only some devices support long writes?
    – Drake
    Apr 23, 2019 at 15:10

3 Answers 3

6
+50

The reason is that you use GattProperty.WriteNoResponse instead of GattProperty.Write. With the no response property variant, the client can only use the "Write without response" ATT command, which is limited by the MTU. With the normal Write property variant, the client can use both "Write with response" ATT request as well as the sequence of multiple prepare writes followed by execute write, also known as "Long write". With long writes, the client (automatically) splits up the write in different chunks with offsets. Note that Long write take considerably more time than if you just increase the MTU due to the number of multiple round trips needed.

5
  • I set it to GattProperty.Write but I still have the same issue. I'd rather have a "long write" than increase the MTU for now.
    – Drake
    Apr 23, 2019 at 14:49
  • Maybe only some devices support long writes?
    – Drake
    Apr 23, 2019 at 15:10
  • You must of course also change the rest of the code where you use "no response". Can you post the full code where you have done the modifications? All Android and iOS devices should support Long Writes.
    – Emil
    Apr 23, 2019 at 20:04
  • I got it to work. It was just that, it had to be GattProperty.Write. Now I use offset and my own delimiter to know when is the end of the string. The only thing now, is that my OnCharacteristicWrite callback (client side) does not have GattStatus.Success as the status, it has the code 133 instead. Even though the server side receives the whole message. And it gets called after about 10 seconds that the server side receives the message. Is there something else I'm missing? Because I need to know when it's successful or not. I updated my post with new code for OnCharacteristicWriteRequest
    – Drake
    Apr 25, 2019 at 19:02
  • 2
    By looking at the documentation at developer.android.com/reference/android/bluetooth/…, I think you also need to override that method OnExecuteWrite and call SendResponse there as well, since the execute packet corresponds to the last ATT packet that the client sends as a "finish" marker, and the client expects a response to know that the server accepted the writes.
    – Emil
    Apr 25, 2019 at 23:46
4

Here are two points here.

  1. why is it limited to 20 bytes?

The core spec defines the default MTU of the ATT to be 23 bytes. After removing one byte of the ATT opcode and the ATT handle2 bytes, the remaining 20 bytes are reserved for the GATT. Considering that some Bluetooth smart devices are weak and don't dare to use memory space too much, the core spec requires that each device must support an MTU of 23. At the beginning of the connection between the two devices, everyone is like a new friend, I don't know the other party's fine, so strictly follow the routine, that is, send up to 20 bytes at a time, which is the most insurance.

  1. How to break through 20?

Since the maximum length of the ATT is 512 bytes, it is sufficient to change the MTU of the transmitted ATT. On Android (API 21), the interface for changing the ATT MTU is:

public boolean requestMtu (int mtu)
#Added in API level 21
#Request an MTU size used for a given connection.
#When performing a write request operation (write without response), the data sent is truncated to the MTU size. This function may be used to request a larger MTU size to be able to send more data at once.
#A onMtuChanged(BluetoothGatt, int, int) callback will indicate whether this operation was successful.
#Requires BLUETOOTH permission.
#Returns true, if the new MTU value has been requested successfully

If your peripheral application changes the MTU and succeeds, then this callback will also be called.

@Override
public void onMtuChanged(BluetoothGatt gatt, int mtu, int status) {
    super.onMtuChanged(gatt, mtu, status);

    if (status == BluetoothGatt.GATT_SUCCESS) {
        this.supportedMTU = mtu;//local var to record MTU size
    }
}

After that, you can happily send the length of the supportedMTU data. Up is java code sample, here is Xamarin Android document for reference. https://developer.xamarin.com/api/member/Android.Bluetooth.BluetoothGatt.RequestMtu/p/System.Int32/

public Boolean RequestMtu (Int32 mtu)
3
  • This is good info. But there must be a way to do a "long write"? Since I can do it with Android to iOS and Windows...
    – Drake
    Apr 23, 2019 at 15:02
  • Maybe only some devices support long writes?
    – Drake
    Apr 23, 2019 at 15:11
  • @Darius No , since now produced android devices almost can support long writes.I think your problem is not writing data, but you need to do cumulative read data processing when you read the data. If the MTU is unchanged, after more than 20 bytes, you need to cycle through the following data when you read it. Set a cache, and the accumulated data is the complete data. Apr 24, 2019 at 1:36
1

I had something similar when reading a response - the BLE device was limiting each read to 20 bytes. However, I could overcome that by reading it in 20 bytes chunks and then waiting for a terminating char before processing the data.

Do you use a terminating char when writing? When you write with your partial string do you get an OnCharacteristicChanged event as a result?

4
  • I'm not breaking it into 20 byte chuncks or anything like that; I'm just sending it as is (it's a json string). I know the MTU is usually around 20 bytes, but it seems to be managed on its own by the framework when I test it with Android <=> iOS and Android <=> Windows. It only faults when I test Android <=> Android. In my iOS version, the "OnCharacteristicWriteRequest" equivalent has an offset that I use to manage the packets, and it gets called as many times as needed to complete the whole string. But in my Android version, OnCharacteristicWriteRequest only gets called once.
    – Drake
    Apr 22, 2019 at 0:40
  • After testing it some more, my OnCharacteristicWriteRequest callback actually got called twice. But I was only able to reproduce this once. Now it's back to being only called once. It seems to be having unpredictable behavior...I tried it with a third Android device in case it's faulty hardware, but still only gets called once.
    – Drake
    Apr 22, 2019 at 0:43
  • Where does OnCharacteristicWriteRequest come from? I'm just using OnCharacteristicWrite. I can't even find OnCharacteristicWriteRequest in the class BluetoothGattCallback Apr 22, 2019 at 6:19
  • It's my own function, a handler for OnCharacteristicWrite
    – Drake
    Apr 22, 2019 at 20:52

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