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I am new in pentest and have a question about MySQL's Operator Precedence and Type Conversion. (more than one comparison operators in WHERE clause)

The table structure is shown as follows (DVWA users table):

user_id int(6) 
first_name varchar(15) 
last_name varchar(15) .....

I tested the results of the following queries (in MySQL 5.7). (P.S.These queries are used for bypass or simply for fun)

SELECT * FROM users WHERE user_id = 1&1=1;

SELECT * FROM users WHERE user_id = 1&1=0;

SELECT * FROM users WHERE user_id = 0&1=0;

SELECT * FROM users WHERE user_id = 1&0=1;

The first one returns 1 record (user_id = 1), The second query returns all records except user_id =1 one. The third one returns all records and the last one returns no record.

The previous four queries have the same output with the following four queries as Bitwise AND (&) has the highest precedence:

SELECT * FROM users WHERE user_id = 1=1;

SELECT * FROM users WHERE user_id = 1=0;

SELECT * FROM users WHERE user_id = 0=0;

SELECT * FROM users WHERE user_id = 0=1;

My question is: What is the precedence of the two comparisons? (as boolean is tinyint(1) and there should be no conversion when comparing int(6) and tinyint(1), not like comparing string and int) Lastly, I also test SELECT * FROM users WHERE user_id = 0<1; and SELECT * FROM users WHERE user_id =0=1=0; which got the same results as the third one. It really seems weird to me. Thank you all for the help.

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    I'd think this would be best answered here – Uueerdo Apr 18 '19 at 18:14
  • You should be using 'AND, not &`. – user207421 Apr 18 '19 at 18:43
  • I would advise you to avoid syntax like this one. If you don't understand it right away, chances are that many people won't get it right, and that will cause issues in production. No one really wants that. As a rule fo thumb use clear syntax. – The Impaler Apr 18 '19 at 18:56
  • @SalmanA what other programming languages? C++ and Java are both left to right, and a little investigation suggests php wouldn't even allow the equivalent expression. – Uueerdo Apr 18 '19 at 21:29
  • @Uueerdo my bad... the equivalent operator is == and not =. – Salman A Apr 19 '19 at 6:47

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