84

I found that there are several ways to handle user's text input with hooks. What is more preferable or proper way to handle an input with hooks? Which would you use?

1) The simplest hook to handle input, but more fields you have, more repetitive code you have to write.

const [username, setUsername] = useState('');
const [password, setPassword] = useState('');

events:

onChange={event => setPassword(event.target.value)}
onChange={event => setUsername(event.target.value)}

2) Similar to above example, but with dynamic key name

const [inputValues, setInputValues] = useState({
  username: '', password: ''
});

const handleOnChange = event => {
  const { name, value } = event.target;
  setInputValues({ ...inputValues, [name]: value });
};

event:

onChange={handleOnChange}

3) An alternative to useState, and as said on ReactJS docs, useReducer is usually preferable to useState.

const [inputValues, setInputValues] = useReducer(
  (state, newState) => ({ ...state, ...newState }),
  {username: '', password: ''}
);

const handleOnChange = event => {
  const { name, value } = event.target;
  setInputValues({ [name]: value });
};

event:

onChange={handleOnChange}

4) useCallback will return a memoized version of the callback that only changes if one of the dependencies has changed.

const [inputValues, setInputValues] = useState({ 
  username: '', password: '' 
});

const handleOnChange = useCallback(event => {
  const { name, value } = event.target;
  setInputValues({ ...inputValues, [name]: value });
});

event:

onChange={handleOnChange}
1
  • 2
    useCallback doesn't make much sense without the 2nd argument (array of dependencies)... IMHO useReduce is more flexible and less error prone than useState for objects – Aprillion Apr 19 '19 at 14:17
88

How about writing a reusable function that returns the input value ... and the <input> itself:

 function useInput({ type /*...*/ }) {
   const [value, setValue] = useState("");
   const input = <input value={value} onChange={e => setValue(e.target.value)} type={type} />;
   return [value, input];
 }

That can then be used as:

 const [username, userInput] = useInput({ type: "text" });
 const [password, passwordInput] = useInput({ type: "text" });

 return <>
   {userInput} -> {username} <br />
   {passwordInput} -> {password}
 </>;
9
  • could you please throw more light on the syntax after the return. It seems pretty new to me. – Jonathan Akwetey Okine Feb 26 '20 at 9:23
  • @JonathanAkweteyOkine if you are talking about the second return, that's the shorthand syntax for React Fragments. See also here: reactjs.org/docs/fragments.html – Marco Feb 27 '20 at 22:45
  • 10
    @Marco The -> arrow is just being rendered as text, and is not any special syntax. – EmpireJones Apr 29 '20 at 16:23
  • 1
    @JonasWilms won't this rebind the onChange listener each evocation? – duhaime Nov 18 '20 at 11:40
  • 1
    @duhaime yes, it would. This snippet is not "ready for copy & paste" it is meant to demonstrate how hooks could be used in the case given with a most minimal example. For sure you can add an useCallback to handle this. – Jonas Wilms Nov 19 '20 at 19:09
25

Yes you can handle react hooks with useState()

import React, {useState} from 'react'

export default () => {
    const [fName, setfName] = useState('');
    const [lName, setlName] = useState('');
    const [phone, setPhone] = useState('');
    const [email, setEmail] = useState('');

const submitValue = () => {
    const frmdetails = {
        'First Name' : fName,
        'Last Name' : lName,
        'Phone' : phone,
        'Email' : email
    }
    console.log(frmdetails);
}

return(
    <>
    <hr/>
    <input type="text" placeholder="First Name" onChange={e => setfName(e.target.value)} />
    <input type="text" placeholder="Last Name" onChange={e => setlName(e.target.value)} />
    <input type="text" placeholder="Phone" onChange={e => setPhone(e.target.value)} />
    <input type="text" placeholder="Email" onChange={e => setEmail(e.target.value)} />
    <button onClick={submitValue}>Submit</button>
    </>
    )
}
24

This is how i'm using right now:

  const [inputValue, setInputValue] = React.useState("");

      const onChangeHandler = event => {
        setInputValue(event.target.value);
      };

      <input
        type="text"
        name="name"
        onChange={onChangeHandler}
        value={inputValue}
      />
6
  • 2
    Was going to comment this. This is the simplest way I feel. Also, this is how Dan Abramov demonstrated it when introducing hooks here: youtube.com/watch?v=dpw9EHDh2bM @ 25:25 – I_am_learning_now Jul 19 '20 at 0:02
  • It's very simple and organic way to understand. Thanks. – marcode_ely Aug 17 '20 at 5:49
  • You should wrap onChangeHandler with useCallback though. – Andreas Linnert Oct 10 '20 at 12:38
  • 3
    @ncesar Currently your code creates a new onChangeHandler on every render of this component. If you pass this handler down to another component or element the value of the prop (here onChange) changes. This makes React re-render memoized components or changing the event handler that's attached to the <input> element. But this is unnecessary work. useCallback gives you the same instance on every render, as long as non of its dependencies change, which setInputValue is one of. This means that the value of onChange won't change -> no re-render or updated event handler. – Andreas Linnert Oct 19 '20 at 21:35
  • 1
    @ncesar Okay, update on this: It seems it's not that simple. Just calling useCallback() costs more performance than it saves in this case. It's only useful in conjunction with child components that are wrapped in React.memo(). – Andreas Linnert Nov 5 '20 at 21:26
3

Here's how I do it (assuming your inputs must be inside a form):

I have a BasicForm component that I use.

It stores all the inputs state into an object into a single useState() call.

It passes via useContext() the inputs state along with an onChange() function and a function setInputInitialState() for the inputs to set their initial state when they are first mounted. It also passes onFocus, onBlur, and it has functions to validate fields which I'm not showing here to simplify the code.

This way I can easily create a form with as many inputs as I want, like:

<BasicForm
      isSubmitting={props.isSubmitting}
      submitAction={ (formState) =>
        props.doSignIn(formState) }
    >
      <TextInput
        type='email'
        label='Email'
        name='email'
        placeholder='Enter email...'
        required
      />
      <TextInput
        type='password'
        label='Password'
        name='password'
        placeholder='Enter password...'
        min={6}
        max={12}
        required
      />
      <SubmitButton
        label='Login'
      />
    </BasicForm>

BasicForm.js

import FormContext from './Parts/FormContext';

function BasicForm(props) {

  const [inputs, setInputs] = useState({});

  function onChange(event) {
    const newValue = event.target.value;
    const inputName = event.target.name;
    setInputs((prevState)=> {
      return({
        ...prevState,
        [inputName]: {
          ...prevState[inputName],
          value: newValue,
          dirty: true
        }
      });
    });
  }

  function setInputInitialState(
    inputName,
    label='This field ',
    type,
    initialValue = '',
    min = false,
    max = false,
    required = false) {

    const INITIAL_INPUT_STATE = {
      label: label,
      type: type,
      onFocus: false,
      touched: false,
      dirty: false,
      valid: false,
      invalid: false,
      invalidMsg: null,
      value: initialValue,
      min: min,
      max: max,
      required: required
    };

    setInputs((prevState) => {
      if (inputName in prevState) {
        return prevState;
      }
      return({
        ...prevState,
        [inputName]: INITIAL_INPUT_STATE
      });
    });

  }

return(
    <FormContext.Provider value={{
      onChange: onChange,
      inputs: inputs,
      setInputInitialState: setInputInitialState,
    }}>
      <form onSubmit={onSubmit} method='POST' noValidate>
        {props.children}
      </form>
    </FormContext.Provider>
  );
}

TextInput.js

The inputse use the useEffect() hook to set their initial state when they're mounted.

function TextInput(props) {

  const formContext = useContext(FormContext);

  useEffect(() => {
    console.log('TextInput useEffect...');
    formContext.setInputInitialState(
      props.name,
      props.label,
      props.type,
      props.initialValue,
      props.min,
      props.max,
      props.required
    );
  },[]);

  return(
      <input
        type={props.type}
        id={props.name}
        name={props.name}
        placeholder={props.placeholder}
        value={([props.name] in formContext.inputs) ?
                  formContext.inputs[props.name].value
                : props.initialValue || ''}
        onChange={formContext.onChange}
        onFocus={formContext.onFocus}
        onBlur={formContext.onBlur}
      >
      </input>
      </div>
      {([props.name] in formContext.inputs) ?
          formContext.inputs[props.name].invalidMsg && <div><span> {formContext.inputs[props.name].invalidMsg}</span></div>
        : null}
    </div>
  );

...
}
1
function App(){
    const [name, setName] = useState("");
    const [istrue, Setistrue] = useState(false);
    const [lastname,setLastname]=useState("");
    
    function handleclick(){
       Setistrue(true);
    }
    
    return(
        <div>
            {istrue ? <div> <h1>{name} {lastname}</h1> </div> : 
            <div>
                <input type="text" placeholder="firstname" name="name" onChange={e =>setName(e.target.value)}/>
                <input type="text" placeholder="lastname" name="lastname" onChange={e =>setLastname(e.target.value)}/>
               <button  type="submit" onClick={handleclick}>submit</button>
            </div>}
        </div>
    )
    
    }

}
0

You are not going to see this mentioned in the React docs, but you may want to consider a form library like Formik

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