5

I'm trying to use gradient_override_map with Tensorflow 2.0. There is an example in the documentation, which I will use as the example here as well.

In 2.0, GradientTape can be used to compute gradients as follows:

import tensorflow as tf
print(tf.version.VERSION)  # 2.0.0-alpha0

x = tf.Variable(5.0)
with tf.GradientTape() as tape:
    s_1 = tf.square(x)
print(tape.gradient(s_1, x))

There is also the tf.custom_gradient decorator, which can be used to define the gradient for a new function (again, using the example from the docs):

import tensorflow as tf
print(tf.version.VERSION)  # 2.0.0-alpha

@tf.custom_gradient
def log1pexp(x):
    e = tf.exp(x)

    def grad(dy):
        return dy * (1 - 1 / (1 + e))

    return tf.math.log(1 + e), grad

x = tf.Variable(100.)

with tf.GradientTape() as tape:
    y = log1pexp(x)

print(tape.gradient(y, x))

However, I would like to replace the gradient for standard functions such as tf.square. I tried to use the following code:

@tf.RegisterGradient("CustomSquare")
def _custom_square_grad(op, grad):
  return tf.constant(0)

with tf.Graph().as_default() as g:
    x = tf.Variable(5.0)
    with g.gradient_override_map({"Square": "CustomSquare"}):
        with tf.GradientTape() as tape:
            s_2 = tf.square(x, name="Square")

    with tf.compat.v1.Session() as sess:
        sess.run(tf.compat.v1.global_variables_initializer())            
        print(sess.run(tape.gradient(s_2, x)))

However, there are two issues: The gradient replacement does not seem to work (it is evaluated to 10.0 instead of 0.0) and I need to resort to session.run() to execute the graph. Is there a way to achieve this in "native" TensorFlow 2.0?

In TensorFlow 1.12.0, the following produces the desired output:

import tensorflow as tf
print(tf.__version__)  # 1.12.0

@tf.RegisterGradient("CustomSquare")
def _custom_square_grad(op, grad):
  return tf.constant(0)

x = tf.Variable(5.0)

g = tf.get_default_graph()
with g.gradient_override_map({"Square": "CustomSquare"}):
    s_2 = tf.square(x, name="Square")
grad = tf.gradients(s_2, x)

with tf.Session() as sess:
  sess.run(tf.global_variables_initializer())
  print(sess.run(grad))
6
+100

There is no built-in mechanism in TensorFlow 2.0 to override all gradients for a built-in operator within a scope. However, if you are able to modify the call-site for each call to the built-in operator, you can use the tf.custom_gradient decorator as follows:

@tf.custom_gradient
def custom_square(x):
  def grad(dy):
    return tf.constant(0.0)
  return tf.square(x), grad

with tf.Graph().as_default() as g:
  x = tf.Variable(5.0)
  with tf.GradientTape() as tape:
    s_2 = custom_square(x)

  with tf.compat.v1.Session() as sess:
    sess.run(tf.compat.v1.global_variables_initializer())            
    print(sess.run(tape.gradient(s_2, x)))
  • 1
    Do you happen to know whether tf.compat.v1.Session()/sess.run() will remain a part of TensorFlow for the foreseeable future? – IonicSolutions Apr 23 '19 at 9:06
  • 2
    The tf.compat.v1 compatibility module contains everything (apart from tf.contrib) from the tf module in the latest release of TF 1.x. There is no plan to remove it from TensorFlow in the foreseeable future, since many libraries still depend on it, although new feature development will focus on the main module, and there may be gaps in compatibility between old- and new-style APIs (though, fortunately, this case works!). – mrry Apr 23 '19 at 14:01
  • dont use compat, it will be gone – datdinhquoc Oct 3 '19 at 11:45

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.