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I want to write a free function that can automatically determine the type of its parameter, based on the return value of a member function of a class. Using decltype, that part is easy.

I also want to have a compile-time assertion to verify an assumption being made about that parameter type, and this is where my proposed solution falls apart.

Consider the following MCVE:

#include <type_traits>
#include <array>
#include <iostream>

class Foo
{
public:
   std::array<int, 10> Get();
};

void PrintFoos(const decltype(Foo().Get())& param)
{
    static_assert(param.size() == 10, "wrong size");
    for (const auto& i : param)
    {
        std::cout << i << "\n";
    }
}

GCC compiles the above code just fine, with nary a warning.

Clang, on the other hand, gripes:

error: static_assert expression is not an integral constant expression
    static_assert(param.size() == 10, "wrong size");
                  ^~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

So does MSVC:

(13): error C2131: expression did not evaluate to a constant
(13): note: failure was caused by a read of a variable outside its lifetime
(13): note: see usage of 'param'

Why does GCC compile this fine, when other compilers reject it? Is there a GCC extension that I'm benefitting from to support this?

What does the language standard have to say about this? I am targeting C++17, but would also be interested in knowing if there are any changes from C++14.

Bonus Question: Is there a way that I can modify this code to make it work? Obviously, the static_assert should fail if the decltype expression does not evaluate to a std::array type, since the size() member function would not be constexpr. I imagine there is a solution involving the addition of a template helper function, but I'd rather not add another function definition unless absolutely necessary.

7
  • Perhaps this has something to do with the way that std::array::size is defined. size is meant to be a member function so param.size() is a constexpr if param is a constexpr (which it isn't). Maybe GCC defined size as static so that param doesn't need to be a constexpr for param.size() to be constexpr. Commented Apr 20, 2019 at 3:25
  • Nope. That's not it. I just checked libc++ and libstdc++. I'm not certain but I think this could be a GCC bug. Commented Apr 20, 2019 at 3:27
  • Does it really have to be decltype(Foo().Get())? If you could just take an std::array<T, N>, you could infer the size of the array from the argument type… Commented Apr 20, 2019 at 3:39
  • @Michael That would require me to hard-code the length of the std::array in that function's signature, which I don't want to do. I only want to maintain the size in one place (the class interface), not in the free function. It's not DRY, in other words. Commented Apr 20, 2019 at 3:39
  • 2
    I'm a bit confused. You say you don't want to maintain the size in two different places, yet what your question is all about is this static_assert that compares the size to a hard-coded value in the place where you now say you don't want to maintain the size as a hardcoded value!? If the array type is already derived from what Foo does, then what for is the static_assert even necessary? It cannot possibly be not the size of the thing that Foo::Get() returns because if it were then the function would never be called!? Commented Apr 20, 2019 at 3:43

1 Answer 1

6

I believe clang and the others (icc and MSVC) are technically correct here and GCC is wrong. A static_assert-declaration takes a constant-expression [expr.const]/2. I believe the relevant C++17 wording for the case at hand should be [expr.const]/2.11:

An expression e is a core constant expression unless the evaluation of e, following the rules of the abstract machine, would evaluate one of the following expressions:

  • […]
  • an id-expression that refers to a variable or data member of reference type unless the reference has a preceding initialization and either
    • it is initialized with a constant expression or
    • its lifetime began within the evaluation of e;
  • […]

The expression in your static_assert above clearly does exactly that, however (param is an id-expression that refers to a variable of reference type, none of the exceptions apply). Thus, it is not a constant expression, and the program is ill-formed [dcl.dcl]/6. The relevant wording in the C++14 standard seems to be identical. I woud consider this a bug in GCC.

If you can change your function into a template, you could simply infer the size:

template <int N>
void PrintFoos(const std::array<int, N>& param)
{
    …
}

Alternatively, if you want to make everything depend on Foo, you could also just define a public constant and derive the array type etc. from that:

class Foo
{
public:
    static constexpr auto size = 10;
    std::array<int, size> Get();
};

void PrintFoos(const decltype(Foo().Get())& param)
{
    static_assert(Foo::size == 10, "wrong size");
}

And, of course, you could use a helper template:

template <typename T>
constexpr std::size_t deduce_array_size = 0U;

template <typename T, std::size_t N>
constexpr std::size_t deduce_array_size<std::array<T, N>> = N;

template <typename T>
constexpr std::size_t deduce_array_size<T&> = deduce_array_size<T>;

template <typename T>
constexpr std::size_t deduce_array_size<T&&> = deduce_array_size<T>;

and then

void PrintFoos(const decltype(Foo().Get())& param)
{
    static_assert(deduce_array_size<decltype(param)> == 10, "wrong size");
}

Finally, yet another option (inspired by the comment by Yakk - Adam Nevraumont below) would be to simply create a prvalue of the array type in your constant expression and ask that for its size:

static_assert(std::decay_t<decltype(param)>{}.size() == 10, "wrong size");
4
  • That, to me, is a defect in the standard; a variable of type std::decay_t<decltype(param)> can have .size() called on it no problem, because .size() doesn't really need its object for arrays.... Commented Apr 20, 2019 at 4:20
  • @Yakk-AdamNevraumont fair enough, I would agree with you, it's what the standard says at the moment, however…unless I overlooked something, of course… Commented Apr 20, 2019 at 4:27
  • Thanks, this is a fantastic answer, and essentially what I was looking for. I'm afraid that my standards-ese is rather weak, so I'm a bit confused by your (and Adam's) observation that the problem really lies with the expression being a reference. If that's the case, why does changing the parameter's type to const std::array<int, 10>& param not create a problem when doing static_assert(params.size() == 10)? It is still a reference in that case. What is the difference between the use of decltype and the explicit type specification? Commented Apr 20, 2019 at 5:09
  • @CodyGray If I change it from const decltype(Foo().Get())& param to const std::array<int, 10>& param, I get the exact same error message in clang. And I should, because there's absolutely no difference between these two versions. The type is exactly the same in both cases. Commented Apr 20, 2019 at 16:30

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