3

If I write this:

clc
clear

close all
format long
fprintf( 1, 'Starting...\n' )

function results = do_thing()
    results = 1;
end

results = do_thing()

And run it with Octave, it works correctly:

Starting...
results =  1

But if I try to run it with Matlab 2017b, it throws this error:

Error: File: testfile.m Line: 13 Column: 1
Function definitions in a script must appear at the end of the file.
Move all statements after the "do_thing" function definition to before the first local function
definition.

Then, if I fix the error as follows:

clc
clear

close all
format long
fprintf( 1, 'Starting...\n' )

results = do_thing()

function results = do_thing()
    results = 1;
end

It works correctly on Matlab:

Starting...

results =

     1

But now, it stopped working with Octave:

Starting...
error: 'do_thing' undefined near line 8 column 11
error: called from
    testfile at line 8 column 9

This problem was explained on this question: Run octave script file containing a function definition

How to fix it without having to create a separate and exclusive file for the function do_thing()?

Is this issue fixed on some newer version of Matlab as 2019a?

2
  • 4
    The solution is managing all of your code in functions instead of scripts as explained in the accepted answer in the linked question. – rahnema1 Apr 20 '19 at 5:50
  • 1
    This looks like the canonical version of this question: stackoverflow.com/questions/50404236/… – Andrew Janke Apr 21 '19 at 13:10
4

The answer is in the comments, but for the sake of clarity:

% in file `do_thing.m`
function results = do_thing()
    results = 1;
end

% in your script file
clc;   clear;   close all;   format long;
fprintf( 1, 'Starting...\n' );
results = do_thing();

Accompanying explanatory rant:

  • The canonical and safest way to define functions is to define them in their own file, and make this file accessible in octave / matlab's path.
  • Octave has supported 'dynamic' function definitions (i.e. in the context of a script or the command-line) since practically forever. However, for the purposes of compatibility, since matlab did not support this, most people did not use it, and quite sensibly relied on the canonical way instead.
  • Matlab has recently finally introduced dynamic function definitions too, but has opted to implement them explicitly in a way that breaks compatibility with octave, as you describe above. (rant: this may be a coincidence and an earnest design decision, but I do note that it also happens to go against prior matlab conventions regarding nested functions, which were allowed to be defined anywhere within their enclosing scope).
  • In a sense, nothing has changed. Matlab was incompatible with advanced octave functionality, and now that it has introduced its own implementation of this functionality, it is still incompatible. This is a blessing in disguise. Why? Because, if you want intercompatible code, you should rely on the canonical form and good programming practices instead of littering your scripts with dynamic functions, which is what you should be doing anyway.
6
  • I actually think that MATLAB’s way is consistent and makes sense. In a function file you can add private functions at the end of the file. They’ve added that exact same functionality for script files. They are not “dynamic functions”, they are private functions. If you were to define a function in the middle of script code, it would look like a nested function, and the function should have access to the workspace of the enclosing script, which is the base workspace. This would be quite a nightmare, IMO. – Cris Luengo Apr 23 '19 at 13:25
  • I’ve always found Octave’s way inconsistent. You can define a function by having Octave parse a function declaration, but also by putting them inside their own file, and also at the end of a function file. It is half-way between Python syntax and MATLAB syntax. :) – Cris Luengo Apr 23 '19 at 13:27
  • @CrisLuengo this is a fair point. My main counterpoint (but I think it's an important one), is the crucial distinction between a script as being a REPL construct (i.e. something you could copy verbatim, line-by-line into a terminal or report processor, and expect it to work), versus something that needs preprocessing and read-ahead in its own right. In that sense, octave is not inconsistent; if anything, it gives you the flexibility to shadow functions appropriately as you see fit (with all the user-caveats that come from that and appropriately generated warnings, of course). – Tasos Papastylianou Apr 23 '19 at 13:41
  • That is true, you cannot copy-paste a script with a private function to MATLAB’s terminal. – Cris Luengo Apr 23 '19 at 13:47
  • @CrisLuengo btw, I wouldn't call these functions "private" either, that term is reserved (matlab/octave). I agree "dynamic" is misleading too though (e.g. octave uses this to describe dynamically loaded precompiled functions). Octave calls them "command-line functions"; matlab seems to have gone for "local functions", (implying they are effectively "subfunctions for scripts"). – Tasos Papastylianou Apr 23 '19 at 16:21
1

Octave's implementation of local functions in scripts is different from Matlab's. Octave requires that local functions in scripts be defined before their use. But Matlab requires that local functions in scripts all be defined at the end of the file.

So you can use local functions in scripts on both applications, but you can't write a script that will work on both. So just use functions if you want code that will work on both Matlab and Octave.

Examples:

Functions at end

disp('Hello world')
foo(42);

function foo(x)
  disp(x);
end

In Matlab R2019a:

>> myscript
Hello world
    42

In Octave 5.1.0:

octave:1> myscript
Hello world
error: 'foo' undefined near line 2 column 1
error: called from
    myscript at line 2 column 1

Functions before use

disp('Hello world')

function foo(x)
  disp(x);
end

foo(42);

In Matlab R2019a:

>> myscript
Error: File: myscript.m Line: 7 Column: 1
Function definitions in a script must appear at the end of the file.
Move all statements after the "foo" function definition to before the first local function definition. 

In Octave 5.1.0:

octave:2> myscript
Hello world
 42

How it works

Note that technically the functions here in Octave are not "local functions", but "command-line functions". Instead of defining a function that is local to the script, they define global functions that come into existence when the function statement is evaluated.

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