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Just playing with some basic code (factorials) but cannot quite get my head around how this is achieving the correct result. The result on each loop does not seem to be stored anywhere - so how does the code remember the iterated value? (I know there are modules - this is just a logic exercise)

def factoral2(num):
    if num == 0:
        return 1

    return num * factoral2(num - 1)

Above is the method that I'm not quite sure how works

def factoral(num):
    number = []

    for i in range(0, num):
        number.append(num)
        num -= 1

    print(number)

    product = 1
    for x in number:
        product *= x

    return product

This was my interpretation of its logic, which is obviously a bit more verbose than what's ideal

Both work - just trying to understand the logic of the optimised version

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ok, let's run through an example lets say the user inputs 2 -> num=2. First, we have to build our way down (essentially we need num to equal 0)

  • first, we call factorial(2), and check the if statement which turns out to be false.
  • therefor factorial(2) = return num * factorial(num-1) = return 2 * factorial(1)
  • the above statement needs to compute the value for factorial(1) before it can return a value, so let's go ahead and do that
  • first, we call factorial(1), and check the if statement which == false
  • therefor factorial(1) = return num * factorial(num-1) = return 1* factorial(0)
  • the above statement needs to compute the value for factorial(0) before it can return a value, so let's go ahead and do that also
  • first, we call factorial(0), and check the if statement which == true
  • therefor factorial(0) = 1

Now we can start building up

  • factorial(0) = 1
  • now just start plugging in values
  • we said factorial(1) = return 1* factorial(0) = return 1* 1 = return 1
  • factorial(1) = 1
  • now we can plug in some more values
  • we said factorial(2) = return 2* factorial(1) = return 2 * 1 = return 2
  • factorial(2) = 2
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0

Thanks to Andreas and below_avg_st for your help. Makes alot more sense now.

As I see it:

  1. Recursive functions generate an infinite loop if a condition to break is not allocated.
  2. (I've re-written the below to state that logic abit more). If X does not equal 0, keep looping through the function while decrementing X.
  3. When the loop does break - (because X = 0) assign a value of 1 - to exit the loop.

    def test(x):
        if x != 0:
            return x * test(x-1)
        else:
            return 1
    
    test(4)
    

Thanks to all for your help

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0

It's a recursive function that calls itself, giving num - 1 as argument. The function supplied:

def factoral2(num):
    if num == 0:
        return 1
    return num * factoral2(num-1)

"gets expanded" into this:

def factoral2(num):
    result = 1

    while (num != 0):
        result *= num
        num -= 1

    return result

value = factoral2(4) can be illustrated as such:

num = 4
    num = 3
        num = 2
            num = 1
                num = 0; return 1
            result = 1
        result = 2 * 1
    result = 3 * 2
result = 4 * 6

value = 24

I'd also like to note out a better non-recursive version of the factorial function, compared to the one you crafted, that unnecessarily creates and fills a list.

def factorial(n):
    if n < 0:
        raise ValueError("The factorial value may only be calculated on positive integers")

    product = 1
    for i in range(2, n + 1):
        product *= i

    return product

– or just a simplified recursive one, using the "ternary operator":

def factorial(n):
    if n < 0:
        raise ValueError("The factorial value may only be calculated on positive integers")

    return 1 if n == 0 else n * factorial(n - 1)
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