0

Whenever I open my site (i.e. http://127.0.0.1:8090), a GET request to / is not made.

app.use(session({
  //session stuff
}));
app.use(bodyParser.urlencoded({ extended: false }));
app.use(express.static('client'));

app.get('/', async function(req, res){
  console.log(req);
}

module.exports = app;
app.listen(8090);

This is not being called and I am unsure why - what can I do to fix this? My other app.get() functions are called when the relevant pages are opened.

  • 3
    Is your file compiled/interpreted properly? I see a syntax error. Close app.get route with ')' and try. Its workingfine for me. – Sreehari Apr 22 at 9:01
  • I closed it with ) and still seem to have the same problem. When I call app.get('*', ...) instead of this, I seem to get an output when I open the page – GregW Apr 22 at 9:17
  • @Sreehari the only way I can get app.get('/') to be called is if I put it before app.use(express.static('client')); - which causes my index.html page not to show, but I get a response in terminal – GregW Apr 22 at 9:34
0

When you open your site (i.e. http://127.0.0.1:8090) it sends a GET request but doesn't send back to the browser any response. That is why it seems GET request wasn't made. Send a response in the app.get and it'll send a response.

app.get('/', async function(req, res){
  console.log(req);
  res.send('Hello World');
}
0

express.static('client') suggest from where your static files are to be loaded. Here 'client' is treated as your root path.

If your 'client' directory has some 'abcd.img' file then, http://127.0.0.1:8090/abcd.img will load 'abcd.img'. 'index.html' in your 'client' directory will be loaded by default when you point to root path. That means 'http://127.0.0.1:8090/' will load your index.html file.

Express has a very good documentation on this part. I am pasting it for your reference. Express documentation for serving static files

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.