I have a question of using switch case for instanceof object:

For example: my problem can be reproduced in Java:

if(this instanceof A)
    doA();
else if(this instanceof B)
    doB();
else if(this instanceof C)
    doC():

How would it be implemented using switch...case?

  • Better to use this only here – Jigar Joshi Apr 7 '11 at 10:06
  • 4
    If you really feel you need a switch you could hash the class name to an int and use that, watch out for possible clashes though. Adding as comment rather than an answer as I don't like the idea of this actually been used. Maybe what you really need is the visitor pattern. – vickirk Apr 7 '11 at 10:13
  • As of java 7 you could even switch on the fully qualified class name to avoid such hash clashes as @vickirk pointed out, but it's still ugly. – Mitja Jun 2 '14 at 16:14

19 Answers 19

up vote 183 down vote accepted

This is a typical scenario where subtype polymorphism helps. Do the following

interface I {
  void do();
}

class A implements I { void do() { doA() } ... }
class B implements I { void do() { doB() } ... }
class C implements I { void do() { doC() } ... }

Then you can simply call do() on this.

If you are not free to change A, B, and C, you could apply the visitor pattern to achieve the same.

  • 24
    Visitor pattern means that A,B and C have to implement an interface with an abstract method that takes a Visitor as an input parameter, what if you cannot change A,B,C and none of them implements that interface? – thermz Aug 7 '14 at 10:11
  • 14
    The last comment about the visitor pattern is wrong. You would still need to make A,B and C implement an interface. – Ben Thurley Jan 27 '15 at 17:17
  • 7
    Sadly this does not work if the do()-Code requires the environment of the host (i.e. access to variables not present in the do() itself). – mafu May 23 '15 at 16:47
  • 2
    @mafu OP's question was about type based dispatching. If your do() method needs more input in order to dispatch than your problem is IMHO outside the scope of the question discussed here. – jmg May 29 '15 at 16:16
  • 1
    this answer assumes that you can modify the classes A,B,C, while I think the point is how to do that without modify A,B,C because they might be in a third part library – daniele Nov 29 '16 at 10:53

if you absolutely cannot code to an interface, then you could use an enum as an intermediary:

public A() {

    CLAZZ z = CLAZZ.valueOf(this.getClass().getSimpleName());
    switch (z) {
    case A:
        doA();
        break;
    case B:
        doB();
        break;
    case C:
        doC();
        break;
    }
}


enum CLAZZ {
    A,B,C;

}
  • thx, I also had to make some changes: 1) initialize each enum id with the Class reference; 2) assert the class simple name with the enum id .toString(); 3)find the enum thru the stored Class reference per enum id. I think this is also obfuscation safe then. – Aquarius Power Feb 2 '15 at 19:05
  • if this.getClass().getSimpleName() does not match a value of CLAZZ it throwns an Exception... it's better to surround with a try catch block and the Exception would be treated as the "default" or "else" option of the switch – tetri Feb 5 '15 at 10:31

Just in case if someone will read it:

The BEST solution in java is :

public enum Action { 
    a{
        void doAction(...){
            // some code
        }

    }, 
    b{
        void doAction(...){
            // some code
        }

    }, 
    c{
        void doAction(...){
            // some code
        }

    };

    abstract void doAction (...);
}

The GREAT benefits of such pattern are:

  1. You just do it like (NO switches at all):

    void someFunction ( Action action ) {
        action.doAction(...);   
    }
    
  2. In case if you add new Action called "d" you MUST imlement doAction(...) method

NOTE: This pattern is described in Joshua's Bloch "Effective Java (2nd Edition)"

  • 1
    nice! Is the @Override required above each implementation of doAction()? – mateuscb Apr 23 '14 at 21:34
  • 3
    How is this the "BEST" solution? How would you decide which action to use? By an outer instanceof-cascade that calls someFunction() with the correct action? This just adds another level of indirection. – PureSpider Jan 14 '16 at 13:30
  • 1
    No, it will be done automatically at runtime. If you call someFunction(Action.a) then a.doAction will be called. – se.solovyev Jan 15 '16 at 14:15
  • 8
    I don't understand this. How would you know which enum to use? As @PureSpider said, this seems like just another level of work to do. – James Manes Jan 27 '16 at 14:59
  • 1
    It is probably case, when you have enum inside appropriate entity already, then you can take it from there... – Sarief Sep 27 '16 at 8:14

You can't. The switch statement can only contain case statements which are compile time constants and which evaluate to an integer (Up to Java 6 and a string in Java 7).

What you are looking for is called "pattern matching" in functional programming.

See also Avoiding instanceof in Java

  • 1
    No, in most functional languages you can't pattern match on types, only on constructors. That is at least true in ML and Haskell. In Scala and OCaml it is possible but not the typical application of pattern matching. – jmg Apr 7 '11 at 10:10
  • Sure, but checking against constructors would be "equivalent" to the scenario described above. – Carlo V. Dango Apr 7 '11 at 10:12
  • 1
    In some cases, but not in general. – jmg Apr 7 '11 at 10:14
  • Switches can also support enums. – Solomon Ucko Jul 2 '16 at 23:50

Just create a Map where the class is the key and the functionality, i.e. lambda or similar, is the value.

Map<Class,Runnable> doByClass = new HashMap<>();
doByClass.put(Foo.class, () -> doAClosure(this));
doByClass.put(Bar.class, this::doBMethod);
doByClass.put(Baz.class, new MyCRunnable());

// of course, refactor this to only initialize once

doByClass.get(getClass()).run();

If you need checked Exceptions than implement a FunctionalInterface that throws the Exception and use that instead of Runnable.

  • 1
    Best solution imho, specially because it allows easy refactoring. – Feiteira Oct 25 '17 at 8:17

As discussed in the top answers, the traditional OOP approach is to use polymorphism instead of switch. There is even a well documented refactoring pattern for this trick: Replace Conditional with Polymorphism. Whenever I reach for this approach, I like to also implement a Null object to provide the default behaviour.

Starting with Java 8, we can use lambdas and generics to give us something functional programmers are very familiar with: pattern matching. It's not a core language feature but the Javaslang library provides one implementation. Example from the javadoc:

Match.ofType(Number.class)
    .caze((Integer i) -> i)
    .caze((String s) -> new BigDecimal(s))
    .orElse(() -> -1)
    .apply(1.0d); // result: -1

It's not the most natural paradigm in the Java world so use it with caution. While the generic methods will save you from having to typecast the matched value, we're missing a standard way to decompose the matched object as with Scala's case classes for example.

I know this is very late but for future readers ...

Beware of the approaches above that are based only on the name of the class of A, B, C ... :

Unless you can guarantee that A, B, C ... (all subclasses or implementers of Base) are final then subclasses of A, B, C ... will not be dealt with.

Even though the if, elseif, elseif .. approach is slower for large number of subclasses/implementers, it is more accurate.

Nope, there is no way to do this. What you might want to do is however to consider Polymorphism as a way to handle these kind of problems.

Using switch statements like this is not the object oriented way. You should instead use the power of polymorphism. Simply write

this.do()

Having previously set up a base class:

abstract class Base {
   abstract void do();
   ...
}

which is the base class for A, B and C:

class A extends Base {
    void do() { this.doA() }
}

class B extends Base {
    void do() { this.doB() }
}

class C extends Base {
    void do() { this.doC() }
}

If you can manipulate the common interface, you could do add in an enum and have each class return a unique value. You won't need instanceof or a visitor pattern.

For me, the logic needed to be in the written in the switch statement, not the object itself. This was my solution:

ClassA, ClassB, and ClassC implement CommonClass

Interface:

public interface CommonClass {
   MyEnum getEnumType();
}

Enum:

public enum MyEnum {
  ClassA(0), ClassB(1), ClassC(2);

  private int value;

  private MyEnum(final int value) {
    this.value = value;
  }

  public int getValue() {
    return value;
  }

Impl:

...
  switch(obj.getEnumType())
  {
    case MyEnum.ClassA:
      ClassA classA = (ClassA) obj;
    break;

    case MyEnum.ClassB:
      ClassB classB = (ClassB) obj;
    break;

    case MyEnum.ClassC:
      ClassC classC = (ClassC) obj;
    break;
  }
...

If you are on java 7, you can put string values for the enum and the switch case block will still work.

  • The value field is redundant if you only want to distinguish the enum constants - you can use the constants directly (as you do). – user905686 Jul 1 at 12:47

You can't a switch only works with the byte, short, char, int, String and enumerated types (and the object versions of the primitives, it also depends on your java version, Strings can be switched on in java 7)

  • 2
    not even on strings yet – Bozho Apr 7 '11 at 10:08
  • You can't switch on Strings in Java 6. And you can't switch on "object versions of the primitives". – Lukas Eder Apr 7 '11 at 10:13
  • @Bozho I did say it depends on your java version, in Java 7 you can switch on Strings. – Tnem Apr 7 '11 at 10:17
  • @Lukas Eder check your java spec you can – Tnem Apr 7 '11 at 10:23
  • ah, sorry, it was not clear enough. – Bozho Apr 7 '11 at 10:23

How about this ?

switch (this.name) 
{
  case "A":
    doA();
    break;
  case "B":
    doB();
    break;
  case "C":
    doC();
    break;
  default:
    console.log('Undefined instance');
}
  • 3
    Should point out that this works only on Java 7. And that you have to call this.getSimpleName() Not sure if the poster is confused with JS (yeah, he's using console, hehe). – pablisco Feb 15 '14 at 22:44
  • 4
    This has a problem of falling out of source code referential transparency. That is, your IDE won't be able to mantain the reference integrity. Suppose you want to rename your name. The reflection is evil. – Val Mar 2 '14 at 14:05
  • Not a great idea. Class names are not unique if you have multiple class loaders. – Doradus Nov 3 '15 at 0:30
  • Breaks when it comes to code compression (→ ProGuard) – Paramaeleon Nov 23 '16 at 11:38

I personally like the following Java 1.8 code:

    mySwitch("YY")
            .myCase("AA", (o) -> {
                System.out.println(o+"aa");
            })
            .myCase("BB", (o) -> {
                System.out.println(o+"bb");
            })
            .myCase("YY", (o) -> {
                System.out.println(o+"yy");
            })
            .myCase("ZZ", (o) -> {
                System.out.println(o+"zz");
            });

Will output:

YYyy

The sample code uses Strings but you can use any object type, including Class. e.g. .myCase(this.getClass(), (o) -> ...

Needs the following snippet:

public Case mySwitch(Object reference) {
    return new Case(reference);
}

public class Case {

    private Object reference;

    public Case(Object reference) {
        this.reference = reference;
    }

    public Case myCase(Object b, OnMatchDo task) {
        if (reference.equals(b)) {
            task.task(reference);
        }
        return this;
    }
}

public interface OnMatchDo {

    public void task(Object o);
}

I think there are reasons to use a switch statement. If you are using xText generated Code perhaps. Or another kind of EMF generated classes.

instance.getClass().getName();

returns a String of the Class Implementation Name. i.e: org.eclipse.emf.ecore.util.EcoreUtil

instance.getClass().getSimpleName();

returns the simple represenation i.e: EcoreUtil

  • You can't use it in switch as case condition because it is not constant value – B-GangsteR Oct 3 '17 at 6:42

If you need to "switch" thru the class type of "this" object, this answer is the best https://stackoverflow.com/a/5579385/2078368

But if you need to apply "switch" to any other variable. I would suggest another solution. Define following interface:

public interface ClassTypeInterface {
    public String getType();
}

Implement this interface in every class you want to "switch". Example:

public class A extends Something implements ClassTypeInterface {

    public final static String TYPE = "A";

    @Override
    public String getType() {
        return TYPE;
    }
}

After that you can use it in following way:

switch (var.getType()) {
    case A.TYPE: {
        break;
    }
    case B.TYPE: {
        break;
    }
    ...
}

The only thing you should care about - keep the "types" unique across all the classes implementing the ClassTypeInterface. It's not a big problem, because in case of any intersection you receive a compile-time error for the "switch-case" statement.

  • Instead of using String for the TYPE, you can use an enum and uniqueness is guaranteed (as done in this answer). However, with any of the approaches you will have to refactor in two places when you do a rename. – user905686 Jul 1 at 12:51
  • @user905686 rename of what? In current example the type "A" is defined inside the Something class to minimize quantity of code. But in real life you obviously should define it outside (in some common place) and there are no any problem with further refactoring. – Sergey Krivenkov Jul 2 at 15:23
  • I mean renaming the class A. Automatic refactoring might not include the variable TYPE = "A" when renaming. Especially if it is outside the corresponding class, one might also forget it when doing it manually. IntelliJ actually also finds the occurrences of the class name in strings or comments but that's just a text search (instead of looking at the syntax tree) and thus includes false positives. – user905686 Jul 4 at 15:52
  • @user905686 it's just an example, to visualize the idea. Do not use String for type definitions in real project, declare some MyTypes class holder with integer constants (or enum) and use them in the classes implementing ClassTypeInterface. – Sergey Krivenkov Jul 8 at 15:48

there is an even simpler way of emulating a switch structure that uses instanceof, you do this by creating a code block in your method and naming it with a label. Then you use if structures to emulate the case statements. If a case is true then you use the break LABEL_NAME to get out of your makeshift switch structure.

        DEFINE_TYPE:
        {
            if (a instanceof x){
                //do something
                break DEFINE_TYPE;
            }
            if (a instanceof y){
               //do something
                break DEFINE_TYPE;
            }
            if (a instanceof z){
                // do something
                break DEFINE_TYPE;
            }
        }

This will work faster and make sence in case
- you can't change model classes (external library)
- process is executed in performance sencitive context
- you have relatively many 'cases'

public static <T> T process(Object model) {
    switch (model.getClass().getSimpleName()) {
        case "Trade":
            return processTrade();
        case "InsuranceTransaction":
            return processInsuranceTransaction();
        case "CashTransaction":
            return processCashTransaction();
        case "CardTransaction":
            return processCardTransaction();
        case "TransferTransaction":
            return processTransferTransaction();
        case "ClientAccount":
            return processAccount();
        ...
        default:
            throw new IllegalArgumentException(model.getClass().getSimpleName());
    }
}

Create an Enum with Class names.

public enum ClassNameEnum {
    A, B, C
}

Find the Class name of the object. Write a switch case over the enum.

private void switchByClassType(Object obj) {

        ClassNameEnum className = ClassNameEnum.valueOf(obj.getClass().getSimpleName());

        switch (className) {
            case A:
                doA();
                break;
            case B:
                doB();
                break;
            case C:
                doC();
                break;
        }
    }
}

Hope this helps.

  • 1
    In contrast to this approach where the coupling between enum constants and classes is done explicitly, you do the coupling implicitly by class name. This will break your code when you rename only one of the enum constant or the class whereas the other approach would still work. – user905686 Jul 1 at 12:57

Here's a functional way of accomplishing it in Java 8 using http://www.vavr.io/

import static io.vavr.API.*;
import static io.vavr.Predicates.instanceOf;
public Throwable liftRootCause(final Throwable throwable) {
        return Match(throwable).of(
                Case($(instanceOf(CompletionException.class)), Throwable::getCause),
                Case($(instanceOf(ExecutionException.class)), Throwable::getCause),
                Case($(), th -> th)
        );
    }

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