1

I have create table query that have the something like this:

  create table table_name(
  id int auto_increment,
  ...
  KEY fk_some_name (some_column_name)
  )

What does this "Key" do? I think the person that wrote it didn't know what he was doing. He named it fk_some_name. I think he wanted to create a foreign key. I've searched for a while but I didn't find the usage of Key keyword used alone.

2

In the case you show, it's just an index that happens to be named fk_some_name.

Many sites don't like to use true foreign key constraints, but they might still need an index on the column to help optimize joins against that column. It could be a naming convention that indexes intended for joins are named with the fk_ prefix.

Also in MySQL if you define a foreign key constraint for a column that already has an index, it'll use that index instead of creating a new index that would be redundant.

KEY and INDEX are synonyms in MySQL in some contexts.

You can do this:

CREATE TABLE ... ( ... {INDEX|KEY} name (some_column_name) )

You can do this:

ALTER TABLE ... ADD {INDEX|KEY} name (some_column_name)

You can't use them interchangeably in some other cases:

Only use KEY, not INDEX:

CREATE TABLE ... ( ... FOREIGN KEY name (col) REFERENCES ... )

Only use INDEX, not KEY:

CREATE INDEX name ON tablename (column_name)

When in doubt, read the reference documentation.

2
  • I see, I suppose it is a nonclustered non unique index. – Diego Alves Apr 22 '19 at 16:39
  • Right. By the way, MySQL doesn't have an option to let you choose the clustered index. The clustered index is always the PRIMARY KEY or if no primary key, then it's the first non-null UNIQUE KEY. – Bill Karwin Apr 22 '19 at 16:41
0

According to the MySQL documentation for create table, KEY is a synonym for INDEX. So this creates an index called "fk_some_name" on one column.

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