4

Consider this function:

template<template<class, class> class C, class T, class Alloc>
void foo(C<T, Alloc>& container) {
    std::cout << container.size() << std::endl;
}

Function foo() accepts a std::vector<T, Alloc>, but it also accepts std::map<Key, T, Compare, Allocator> in C++17 because Compare and Allocator have default values. Note std::map fails in C++14.

How can I make foo() only accept templates with exactly only 2 template parameters, so it fails with std::map in C++17?

  • 2
    Why do you want to? Why is the number of template parameters significant? – Barry Apr 22 at 22:46
  • 1
    I have an overload of foo with 4 template parameters to match std::map, but foo(std::map) is ambiguous in c++17. – ChronoTrigger Apr 22 at 22:47
  • 1
    Do you want to exclude map or any C<> with more than 2 arguments? Why do you want to do this whole thing anyway? This looks very much like a typical XY problem – Walter Apr 22 at 22:48
  • Note that std::vector can have any number of template arguments. – Mooing Duck Apr 22 at 22:48
  • 1
    I want to exclude all C<> with more than 2 arguments. It's likely a XY problem, but long story short, it is to update 3rd party code. – ChronoTrigger Apr 22 at 22:49
3

How can I make foo only accept templates with exactly only 2 template parameters, so it fails with std::map in C++17?

If you want avoid that foo() accept a container accepting three or more template parameters (so fail with std::map) is relatively simple: you can follow the rtpax's suggestion or, given a custom type traits that say if a type is based on a two type accepting container

template <typename>
struct accept2 : std::false_type
 { };

template <template <typename...> class C, typename X, typename Y>
struct accept2<C<X, Y>> : std::true_type
 { };

and a similar type traits for a three-accepting container

template <typename>
struct accept3 : std::false_type
 { };

template <template <typename...> class C, typename X, typename Y, typename Z>
struct accept3<C<X, Y, Z>> : std::true_type
 { };

you can SFINAE enable foo() only if the deduced type accept two but doesn't accept three types

template <typename C>
std::enable_if_t<accept2<C>{} && !accept3<C>{}> foo (C const & container)
 { }

But this solution (and also the rtpax one) has a problem: what about a container that receive before two template types and after one (or more) template not-type parameter with default values?

Or two template types and one (or more) template-template parameter with default values? Maybe with different signatures?

You can add specializations for accept3 to recognize the other cases but there are infinite combinations of type, non-type and template-template parameter, with default value, after the first two template type. So you have to write infinite specializations to intercept all cases.

This is a little unpractical.

And I suspect there isn't (in C++17) a practical solution.

Anyway, a full compiling example (avoiding three or more template types containers) follows

#include <map>
#include <vector>
#include <type_traits>

template <typename>
struct accept2 : std::false_type
 { };

template <template <typename...> class C, typename X, typename Y>
struct accept2<C<X, Y>> : std::true_type
 { };

template <typename>
struct accept3 : std::false_type
 { };

template <template <typename...> class C, typename X, typename Y, typename Z>
struct accept3<C<X, Y, Z>> : std::true_type
 { };

template <typename C>
std::enable_if_t<accept2<C>{} && !accept3<C>{}> foo (C const &)
 { }

int main()
 {
   std::vector<int> v;
   std::map<int,int> m;

   foo(v);   // compile
   //foo(m); // compilation error
 }
2

Create a template overload of the function that takes a container with three elements. When you try to use a container with two parameters it will work, when you try and use something with three parameters with the third having a default value (like std::map) it will fail (since either one could overload it).

#include <map>
#include <vector>
#include <iostream>

template<template<class, class, class> class C, class Key, class T, class Alloc>
void foo(C<Key, T, Alloc>& container) {
    std::cout << "three arguments" << std::endl;
}

template<template<class, class> class C, class T, class Alloc>
void foo(C<T, Alloc>& container) {
    std::cout << "two arguments" << std::endl;
}



int main() {
    std::vector<int> v;
    std::map<int,int> m;

    foo(v);
    foo(m);
}

note that this doesn't work if someone inputs something like

template <class A, class B, class C> bar{};

since that will only match the three parameter option, so it won't be ambiguous

  • Your solution works with g++ but doesn't compile with clang++. I don't know who's right but, to works with both compilers, seems enough add a class... in template-template signature for the three case function (I mean: template<template<class, class, class, class...> class C, class Key, class T, class Alloc>) – max66 Apr 23 at 1:29
1

Add one level of indirection that uses a variadic template argument instead of two fixed ones. Then you can use good old enable_if to disable it whenever the count is not two:

template<template<class...> class C, class T, class Alloc>
void foo_impl(C<T, Alloc>& container) {
    std::cout << container.size() << std::endl;
}

template<template<class...> class C, class... Args>
std::enable_if_t<sizeof...(Args) == 2> foo(C<Args...>& container) {
    foo_impl(container);
}

See here how it works.

Side note: Apparently, latest clang and latest msvc do not handle it correctly yet. clang (experimental concepts) does, however.

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