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I am new to Python so I decided to make a little project that downloads some files off a server. Everything working great, I decided to check the integrity of the files downloaded by generating the MD5 and comparing with the server's MD5. The problem is, it does not always work. Sometimes with some files it's able to generate the correct MD5, but most (about 80%) of the generated MD5s do not match the server's.

I tried many different examples that I could find to generate MD5s but all of them produce the same result.

Note: I am reading the file in 64kB chunks because I am kind of resource-limited (running the script on a Raspberry Pi), so I thought that would be a good idea to do this. And yes, I already tried loading the file all at once – same result.

def md5_check(self, file_path, original_md5):
        calculated_md5 = hashlib.md5()
        with open(file_path, "rb") as file:
            while True:
                chunk = file.read(65536)  #The downloaded file will be read in 64kB chunks
                if not chunk: break
                calculated_md5.update(chunk)

        calculated_md5 = calculated_md5.hexdigest()
  • WFM for py2.7.15 win64. I suspect your download is losing data or something. Could you give a minimal reproducible example? – ivan_pozdeev Apr 23 at 1:22
  • For the record, I was comparing hexdigest() result with that calculated by the md5sum utility, it matched. – ivan_pozdeev Apr 23 at 1:24
  • 2
    Are you sure that downloaded files have actually finished downloading / are not corrupted? – Alberto Poljak Apr 23 at 1:40
  • 2
    Your code is fine, are you sure the hash you are comparing against is actually correct? – MyNameIsCaleb Apr 23 at 1:46
  • 4
    Run md5sum on the file to find out what its real MD5 is. Then you will know which part is broken – the MD5 code, the download code, or the server MD5. – Boann Apr 23 at 2:12
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Answer:

I isolated the code from my project in a script and compared the MD5 my script gave with the result from md5sum, the results where correct.

As Boann pointed out, I checked the server's response to see the server's MD5 was correct or broken. The server provided 3 different URLs for a file, and calculated the MD5 for the "uncompressed" (original) one. Since the one of the URLs was labeled "original_file_url" I thought it was the link for the original file. It wasn't.

For the sake of helping others with similar problems I will leve my isolated code here

import os
import urllib
import urllib.request
import hashlib

def save_file():
        requester =  urllib.request.Request("https://www.python.org/ftp/python/3.7.3/python-3.7.3.exe", headers={"User-Agent": "Mozilla/5.0"})
        arquivo = urllib.request.urlopen(requester)
        file_to_write = arquivo.read()
        file_directory = "C:\\Users\\myuser\\Documents\\python-3.7.3.exe"

        with open(file_directory, "wb") as file:
            file.write(file_to_write)
        md5_check(file_directory)

def md5_check(file_path):
        calculated_md5 = hashlib.md5()
        with open(file_path, "rb") as file:
            while True:
                chunk = file.read(65536)
                if not chunk: break
                calculated_md5.update(chunk)

        calculated_md5 = calculated_md5.hexdigest()
        print(calculated_md5)


save_file()
wait = input("")

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