2

My company uses raw, untyped DataSets filled via Stored Procedures exclusively. I have been tasked with finding a way to retrieve very large result sets (paging) and ways to get Lazy Loading functionality (at least I think this is lazy loading; I'm still learning that stuff to be honest) so we aren't pulling back tens of thousands of rows in one batch and hogging server resources.

I personally am not that familiar with DataSets as I avoid them whenever possible, and I would rather get rid of them entirely here, but saying "Change everything to use LINQ/EF" isn't going to be a valid answer since there's no business value to management (and it would take too long to redo things, so the idea would be shot down immediately).

Are there some resources I can look into to get this same kind of functionality but using standard untyped DataSets?

EDIT: Also, I need a solution that can work with dynamically created SQL that does not use a stored procedure.

4
  • wrt to terminology, I tend to use "paging" to describe the functionality you require; "lazy loading" I have used to describe the partial initial loading of more complex object graphs/models, followed, at a later point, by the on-demand loading of further parts of the graph, as required. [I don't have a reference for this, so it may just be me...]
    – richaux
    Apr 7, 2011 at 13:01
  • BTW, categorically avoiding DataSets is like avoiding bool or int. A DataSet is what it is - a well-written, 100% reliable, generic in-memory representation of database data, and it's extremely useful in a number of different situations. To be fair, however, I definitely wouldn't use them for a high-traffic website. Apr 7, 2011 at 13:04
  • I've always used Lazy Loading to mean "Don't execute this until I actually need it", but the requirements as my manager said was "lazy loading" so I'm using that here :) On the subject of DataSets I agree, but I think there are much better solutions that there are few scenarios where DataSets are a better choice than the alternatives. Apr 7, 2011 at 13:05
  • "Paging" is sort of a form of lazy loading - it's just not normally called that (it's normally called "paging"). Apr 7, 2011 at 13:10

4 Answers 4

2

All you need to do is to modify your stored procedure to page the result set. This of course will also mean that you'll have to pass as parameters certain criteria such as page number etc. Assuming you're using SQL Server 05 or newer, take a look at the following:

http://www.codeproject.com/KB/database/PagingResults.aspx

2

You'll need to implement paging inside your stored procedures. I assume you're using Sql Server, so here's a link:

http://www.davidhayden.com/blog/dave/archive/2005/12/30/2652.aspx

Note that this has nothing to do with DataSets per se. Presumably, your code generates a DataSet from a stored procedure call. If you rewrite your procs to do paging, your code will then generate a DataSet that contains only the requested page's records.

You could use the DataSet returned by your original proc to implement paging, by caching the DataSet and returning only selected rows to the client (or more accurately, using only selected rows of the DataSet to generate the client HTML), but this is a super-duper, really bad idea.

1
  • Why you said that is a bad idea? I would like to know your comments
    – IGeoorge
    May 22 at 0:18
1

I had the same problem with asp.net 2.0 website, there is no "lazy-loading" solution to this. In order to paginate the data-sets I am using 2 sprocs that will help me wrap the paging functionality on every select I am doing.

CREATE PROCEDURE [dbo].[Generic_Counting]
    @tables VARCHAR(MAX),
    @filter VARCHAR(MAX) = '1=1'    
AS
BEGIN
    SET NOCOUNT ON;


    DECLARE @strQuery VARCHAR(8000)

    SET @strQuery = ' SELECT COUNT(*) FROM '+ @tables +'
             WHERE '+ @filter 

    execute     (@strQuery)
    IF @@ERROR<>0 
    BEGIN 
        --error on generic count
        SET NOCOUNT OFF
        RETURN 10067
    END

    SET NOCOUNT OFF
    RETURN 0
END
GO

CREATE PROCEDURE [dbo].[Generic_Paging]
    @tables VARCHAR(1000),
    @pk VARCHAR(100), 
    @pageNumber INT = 1,
    @pageSize INT = 10, 
    @fields VARCHAR(MAX) = '*',
    @filter VARCHAR(MAX) = '1=1',
    @orderBy VARCHAR(MAX) = NULL
AS
BEGIN
    SET NOCOUNT ON;
    DECLARE @strQuery VARCHAR(8000) 
    DECLARE @strMinRecord VARCHAR(12);
    DECLARE @strMaxRecord VARCHAR(12);

    SET @strMinRecord = CONVERT(VARCHAR(12),((@pageNumber -1)*@pageSize + 1))  
    SET @strMaxRecord = CONVERT(VARCHAR(12), (@pageNumber * @pageSize)) 

        -- Use ROW_NUMBER function

    SET @strQuery ='
    WITH Generic_CTE As
    (
        SELECT ''RowNumber'' = ROW_NUMBER() OVER(ORDER BY ' +
        ISNULL(@orderBy,@pk) +'),' + 
        @fields + 
        ' FROM ' + @tables +
        ' WHERE ('+ @filter +')
    )
    SELECT ' + @fields + '
    FROM Generic_CTE
    WHERE RowNumber BETWEEN ' + @strMinRecord +' AND '+ @strMaxRecord 



    --print @strQuery
    execute (@strQuery)

    IF @@ERROR<>0 
    BEGIN 
        --error on generic paging
        SET NOCOUNT OFF
        RETURN 10066
    END
    SET NOCOUNT OFF 
    RETURN 0
END
GO
-1

You could take a look at the Value List Handler pattern, designed to be used where "the client requires a list of items ... for presentation. The number of items in the list is unknown and can be quite large in many instances."

The examples (in the link above and here) are for Java but should translate to asp.net fairly readily.

4
  • Wish people would say why they vote something down; this isn't bad advice the only thing I can think of it's a bit complicated when there's easier ways (see the other responses), but no reason to downvote out of the blue. Apr 7, 2011 at 13:03
  • The -1 was from me. Two problems: 1) this is C#, not java; and 2) a pattern is not an actual solution. If I'd had my coffee already, I probably wouldn't have bothered down-voting. Apr 7, 2011 at 13:08
  • No worries, was just curious :) Apr 7, 2011 at 13:14
  • Was curious too :) I understand the reasons why its been downvoted; if I'd posted a specific c# example it would indeed have been a better answer.
    – richaux
    Apr 7, 2011 at 14:13

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