33

There is a feature called 'flash' in ruby on rails where you can put a message in 'flash', redirect, and the message is available in the next action.

Example of the use of flash:

There is a controller action Account.ChangePassword. If password change is successful, ChangePassword will fill flash with a message 'Password change successful', and then redirects to Account.Profile. In Account.Profile, the message is available so it can be displayed in the profile page.

Is there something equivalent in ASP.NET MVC 3?

I know I can build this feature myself using tempdata, but does MVC 3 have something built in?

3
  • tempdata valid for 2 next result from last one and never can be used again. – user605334 Apr 7 '11 at 12:51
  • Endy, the post that you reference has a very nice implementation and i added a slightly more verbose version below :) – jim tollan Apr 7 '11 at 14:32
  • Nice package for .net core github.com/lurumad/core-flash – Tim Abell Jul 9 '18 at 13:35
23

No, the TempData solution is what you are looking for.

1
  • It should be noted that by default TempData is stored in Session State, and if you're in a farmed environment and not using an out of process session state, there is no guarantee that the user will see the message. – ctorx Mar 18 '15 at 18:42
24

Endy,

I 'borrowed' this from the tekpub series:

namespace System.Web.Mvc {
    public static class FlashHelpers {

        public static void FlashInfo(this Controller controller,string message) {
            controller.TempData["info"] = message;
        }
        public static void FlashWarning(this Controller controller, string message) {
            controller.TempData["warning"] = message;
        }
        public static void FlashError(this Controller controller, string message) {
            controller.TempData["error"] = message;
        }

        public static string Flash(this HtmlHelper helper) {

            var message = "";
            var className = "";
            if (helper.ViewContext.TempData["info"] != null) {
                message =helper.ViewContext.TempData["info"].ToString();
                className = "info";
            } else if (helper.ViewContext.TempData["warning"] != null) {
                message = helper.ViewContext.TempData["warning"].ToString();
                className = "warning";
            } else if (helper.ViewContext.TempData["error"] != null) {
                message = helper.ViewContext.TempData["error"].ToString();
                className = "error";
            }
            var sb = new StringBuilder();
            if (!String.IsNullOrEmpty(message)) {
                sb.AppendLine("<script>");
                sb.AppendLine("$(document).ready(function() {");
                //sb.AppendFormat("$('#flash').html('{0}');", message);
                sb.AppendFormat("$('#flash').html('{0}');", HttpUtility.HtmlEncode(message));
                sb.AppendFormat("$('#flash').toggleClass('{0}');", className);
                sb.AppendLine("$('#flash').slideDown('slow');");
                sb.AppendLine("$('#flash').click(function(){$('#flash').toggle('highlight')});");
                sb.AppendLine("});");
                sb.AppendLine("</script>");
            }
            return sb.ToString();
        }

    }
}

typical usage (inside controller):

public ActionResult Delete(int id, FormCollection collection)
{
    var item = _session.Single<UserActions>(x=>x.ID == id);
    try
    {
        _session.Delete<UserActions>(item);
        _session.CommitChanges();
        this.FlashInfo("UserAction deleted ...");
        return RedirectToAction("Index");
    }
    catch
    {
        this.FlashError("There was an error deleting this record");
        return View("Edit",item);
    }
}

the css is pretty straightfwd too:

.info
{
    background-color: #CCFFCC;
    border-top: 1px solid #FFCC66;
    border-bottom: 4px solid #FFCC66;
    padding: 6px;
    font-family: helvetica;
    font-size: 1.1em;
    text-align: center;
    border-top-color: #006600;
    border-bottom-color: #006600;
    font-weight: bold;
    color: #339933;
    cursor:pointer;
}
.warning
{
    background-color: #FFFF99;
    border-top: 1px solid #FFCC66;
    border-bottom: 4px solid #FFCC66;
    padding: 6px;
    font-family: helvetica;
    font-size: 0.9em;
    text-align: center;
    border-top-color: #CC9900;
    border-bottom-color: #CC9900;
    font-weight: bold;
    color: #663300;
    cursor:pointer;
}
.error
{
    background-color: #FFCC99;
    border-top: 1px solid #FFCC66;
    border-bottom: 4px solid #FFCC66;
    padding: 4px;
    font-family: helvetica;
    font-size: 1.1em;
    text-align: center;
    border-top-color: #800000;
    border-bottom-color: #800000;
    font-weight: bold;
    color: #990000;
    cursor:pointer;
}

and in your site.master

<%=Html.Flash() %>
<body>
    <div id="flash" style="display: none">
    </div>
.... etc
</body>

enjoy...

4
  • yes, shame about that. it kinda works ok, but would be nice to be extended beyond that limitation. bit of homework if you fancy :) – jim tollan Apr 7 '11 at 15:31
  • 1
    @jimtollan What tekpuk video are you referencing? – FarFigNewton Mar 30 '12 at 20:21
  • guanome - i'll have to have a look back to see whaich one it was, don't have a bookmark on it :(. will get with ref back if i find it – jim tollan Mar 31 '12 at 8:11
  • Thanks for this code. Just a small comment for anyone using it - if you have more than one message set for a request, it takes multiple requests to flush the queue, so you probably want to handle the error level item first. – Savage Jan 1 '13 at 19:51
16

I want to upgrade Jim's answer to use MVC 3's new helper functions.

Helper functions make it easy to write functions that primarily return Html/javascript so you don't have to use string builder or string concatenation. It results in much cleaner code.

FlashHelpers.cs :

namespace System.Web.Mvc {

    public static class FlashHelpers {

        public static void FlashInfo(this Controller controller,string message) {
            controller.TempData["info"] = message;
        }
        public static void FlashWarning(this Controller controller, string message) {
            controller.TempData["warning"] = message;
        }
        public static void FlashError(this Controller controller, string message) {
            controller.TempData["error"] = message;
        }
    }
}

Then you create the ASP.NET App_Code folder and create a .cshtml file there (Flash.cshtml probably) and paste in the following code

App_Code/Flash.cshtml :

@helper FlashMessage(TempDataDictionary tempData){
    var message = "";
    var className = "";
    if (tempData["info"] != null)
    {
        message = tempData["info"].ToString();
        className = "flashInfo";
    }
    else if (tempData["warning"] != null)
    {
        message = tempData["warning"].ToString();
        className = "flashWarning";
    }
    else if (tempData["error"] != null)
    {
        message = tempData["error"].ToString();
        className = "flashError";
    }
    if (!String.IsNullOrEmpty(message))
    {
        <script type="text/javascript">
            $(document).ready(function() {
            $('#flash').html('@message');
            $('#flash').toggleClass('@className');
            $('#flash').slideDown('slow');
            $('#flash').click(function(){$('#flash').toggle('highlight')});
            });
        </script>
    }
}

This is doing what the Flash function was doing before but in a much cleaner way.

Rest of the things stay the same as in Jim's answer except the way you call it. Instead of using @Html.Flash(), you need to call it like so:

@Flash.FlashMessage(TempData)

Please note that Flash in the above line is the name of the .cshtml file in the App_Code folder.

Hope it helps.

0
16

I refactored Imran's answer to make the code shorter:

Helpers/FlashHelper.cs

namespace System.Web.Mvc
{
    public enum FlashEnum
    {
        Success = 1,
        Info = 2,
        Warning = 3,
        Error = 4
    }
    public static class FlashHelper
    {
        public static void Flash(this Controller controller, string message, 
            FlashEnum type = FlashEnum.Success)
        {
            controller.TempData[string.Format("flash-{0}", 
                type.ToString().ToLower())] = message;
        }
    }
}

App_Code/Flash.cshtml

@helper FlashMessage(System.Web.Mvc.TempDataDictionary tempData)
{
    var flash = tempData.Where(item => item.Key.StartsWith("flash-"))
        .Select(item => 
            new { Message = item.Value, ClassName = item.Key }).FirstOrDefault();
    if (flash != null)
    {
    <script type="text/javascript">
        $(function () {
            var $flash = $('<div id="flash" style="display:none;">');
            $flash.html('@flash.Message');
            $flash.toggleClass('flash');
            $flash.toggleClass('@flash.ClassName');
            $('body').prepend($flash);
            $flash.slideDown('slow');
            $flash.click(function () { $(this).slideToggle('highlight'); });
        });
    </script>
    }
}

CSS code borrowed from twitter bootstrap

/* Styles for flash messages
-----------------------------------------------------------*/

.flash
{
    padding: 8px 35px 8px 14px;
    margin-bottom: 18px;
    border: 1px solid;
}

.flash-success
{
    color: #468847;
    background-color: #DFF0D8;
    border-color: #D6E9C6;
}

.flash-info
{
    color: #3A87AD;
    background-color: #D9EDF7;
    border-color: #BCE8F1;
}

.flash-warning
{
    color: #C09853;
    background-color: #FCF8E3;
    border-color: #FBEED5;
}

.flash-error
{
    color: #B94A48;
    background-color: #F2DEDE;
    border-color: #EED3D7;
}

usage inside controller:

this.Flash("Huston, we have an error!!", FlashEnum.Error);

usage inside layout (or other cshtml file):

@Flash.FlashMessage(TempData)
3
  • +1 tyler, this thread has a life of its own. short and sweet!! :-) – jim tollan Aug 7 '12 at 12:59
  • 1
    tyler, i have a minor edit that may be useful, so hope you don't mind me changing your answer to accomodate, feel free to revert if not happy. – jim tollan Aug 7 '12 at 13:22
  • I found out the helper has access to the ViewContext, so you don't have to pass in the TempData. You can use this in the helper: var tempData = htmlHelper.ViewContext.TempData; and then the call in the view becomes just: @Html.FlashMessage() – Mattio Jul 18 '14 at 21:26
14

I know there are several solutions out there, but I was looking for a pure C# solution. I like @TylerLong's solution the best, though I wanted to support multiple messages for each type. Plus, this is updated for ASP.NET MVC4, and being that there are no config file changes necessary, it would probably work for other versions of the MVC framework as well.

Features

  • Pure C# solution
  • Uses view helpers, partials and an extension method to the Controller class
  • Should be compatible with multiple versions of the MVC framework
  • Supports multiple messages per type
  • No config changes to your Web.config files

1) Create MvcProject/Helpers/FlashHelper.cs

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Web;
using System.Web.Mvc;

namespace MvcProject.Helpers
{
    public enum FlashLevel
    {
        Info = 1,
        Success = 2,
        Warning = 3,
        Danger = 4
    }

    public static class FlashHelper
    {
        public static void Flash(this Controller controller, string message, FlashLevel level)
        {
            IList<string> messages = null;
            string key = String.Format("flash-{0}", level.ToString().ToLower());

            messages = (controller.TempData.ContainsKey(key))
                ? (IList<string>)controller.TempData[key]
                : new List<string>();

            messages.Add(message);

            controller.TempData[key] = messages;
        }
    }
}

2) Create MvcProject/Views/Shared/_Flash.cshtml as a Partial:

@helper FlashMessage(System.Web.Mvc.TempDataDictionary tempData)
{
    <div class="flash-messages">
    @foreach (FlashLevel level in (FlashLevel[]) Enum.GetValues(typeof(FlashLevel)))
    {
        string type = level.ToString().ToLower();
        string key = "flash-" + type;

        if (tempData.ContainsKey(key))
        {
            IList<string> messages = (IList<string>)tempData[key];

            foreach (string message in messages)
            {
                <p class="alert alert-@type" role="alert">@message</p>
            }
        }
    }
    </div>
}

@FlashMessage(TempData)

3) Render the _Flash partial in MvcProject/Views/Shared/_Layout.cshtml

@Html.Partial("_Flash")

This will cause the flash messages to be included in the web page.

4) Add flash messages in your Controllers

The last piece of the puzzle is in your Controllers, which should now have a method called Flash(string message, FlashLevel level):

using MvcProject.Helpers;

public class FoosController : Controller
{
    public ActionResult Edit(int id, FooViewModel model)
    {
        // ...
        this.Flash("Foo was updated", FlashLevel.Success);
        this.Flash("Another success message!", FlashLevel.Success);
        this.Flash("But there was a slight problem...", FlashLevel.Warning);

        return RedirectToAction("Edit", new { id = id });
    }
}
3
  • This answer has not gotten nearly enough love. :) – Kjensen May 28 '15 at 20:32
  • This works great with bootstrap if you change the class from "flash-{0}" to "alert alert-{0}" and don't use the primary or error levels. There is no need for the extra .flash-messages css. – thelem Jan 4 '17 at 12:34
  • 1
    @thelem: I took your suggestions and updated my answer. Thanks! – Greg Burghardt Jan 4 '17 at 15:37
3

I've written an example of Rails style Flash messages for ASP.NET using cookies and JavaScript on the client, with source code & example.

Usage

Add a reference to the two JavaScript files: jquery.cookie.js (standard jQuery cookie plugin) and jQuery.flashMessage.js

Reference the _Flash.cshtml partial within your main layout view. This will determine where the flash messages appear.

@Html.Partial("_Flash")

Add the FlashMessageExtensions.cs static extension method class to your website.

Within your MVC controllers simply use the .Success("message to show") and the corresponding Error, Warning or Information extension methods on ActionResult to set the flash cookie on the response. Remember to add the necessary using statement to use these methods from flash extension class above.

[HttpPost]
public ActionResult Create()
{
    return RedirectToAction("Index").Success("Message shown to user after redirect");
}

By default the flash message will fade out after 3 seconds or if the user clicks on it. The fade-out delay is configurable by setting the timeout option when configuring the JavaScript flash plugin, or can be disabled be setting it to 0.

2
  • 1
    This cookie based approach allows you to use the common Post/Redirect/Get (PRG) pattern to help avoid certain duplicate form submissions. – Ben Smith Jan 11 '13 at 11:24
  • THIS is the most underrated answer here. People arguing for TempData forget scenarios such as: what if you have two application servers? and the requests are being round robbined between them? TempData won't work! This is the way to go! Much thanks for your answer – João Antunes Oct 1 '17 at 11:05
0

This is a much requested feature which was in MvcContrib 2.0 - I am not sure if it made it to 3.0. I personally keep it in the session for a short period when I am doing PRG = Post-Redirect-Get.

1
  • TempData does exactly that (keep a value for a short period in Session, then pop it after the first usage). – Wiebe Tijsma Dec 22 '11 at 15:00
0

I think this would make you happy. https://github.com/khalidabuhakmeh/MvcFlash

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