2

I am using FileSystemWatcher class in C# to track the changes on a file whenever the user saves the file after modifying it.

FileSystemWatcher watcher = new FileSystemWatcher()
{
    Path = DIR_NAME,
    NotifyFilter = NotifyFilters.LastWrite | 
                   NotifyFilters.CreationTime | 
                   NotifyFilters.LastAccess,
    Filter = "*.pdf",
    IncludeSubdirectories = true,
    EnableRaisingEvents = true
};

watcher.Changed += OnChanged;

However, the file that I want to track is getting created programmatically, as follows:

FileStream stream = FileUtil.CreateNewFile(filePath); // Creates a file
file.WriteFileToStream(stream); // Writes into the file

Ideally, my code is supposed to run as follows:

  1. The program will create a file and write some content into it.
  2. User opens the file, modifies it and saves.
  3. At this point, it should trigger OnChanged, i.e. I want my OnChanged handler code to execute only when a real user modifies it and saves it.

However, it's getting triggered whenever the file is getting written into programmatically, i.e. on the following line:

file.WriteFileToStream(stream);

Which is, technically, correct behavior, as it's tracking the change in the file. However, my business case doesn't allow the OnChanged handler code to be executed when the file is initially created and written into.

My question is, is there a workaround to skip the OnChanged call when the file is created and written into first time programmatically?

Note:

  1. The application architecture requires that the FileSystemWatcher is initialized when my application starts. So I cannot register it after the file is created.
  2. This is a multi-user application, where multiple users will be writing into the files simultaneously, so I cannot disable the watcher before creating the file and enable it after its created:

watcher.EnableRaisingEvents = false; 
CreateFile();
watcher.EnableRaisingEvents = true;
7
  • 1
    Why are you using the same handler (OnChanged) for both Created and Changed? User, apparently, only modify the file. The same goes for Deleted.
    – Jimi
    Apr 23, 2019 at 23:22
  • I was trying various options available and forgot to take them out. However, the original problem remains. I want to ignore the first trigger. Apr 23, 2019 at 23:33
  • 1
    Well, assign different event handlers and see what is the sequence of events that triggers. I'm pretty sure you'll figure out that there's a path you can follow to determine when a File is being created or modified. Since your app is the only one party that creates these files...
    – Jimi
    Apr 23, 2019 at 23:37
  • I attached different handlers such as OnCreated and OnDeleted. However, they don't get triggered when I delete or create a file. Not sure what am I missing. Apr 23, 2019 at 23:44
  • 1
    Yes, that fixed it. Deleted/Created are working now. Thanks! Apr 24, 2019 at 0:10

4 Answers 4

1

Approach One:

  1. Create and save the file in a directory that is not being watched.
  2. Move the file into the directory being watched.

Approach Two:

When a file is created, use OnCreated() event handler to add the file name to a filesToIgnore list.

In the OnChanged event handler, check if the filesToIgnore list contains the file name. If it does, remove it from the list (to process it next time) and return from the handler.

private List<string> filesToIgnore = new List<string>();

private void OnCreated(object source, FileSystemEventArgs file)
{
   filesToIgnore.Add(file.Name);
}

private void OnChanged(object source, FileSystemEventArgs file)
{
    if(filesToIgnore.Contains(file.Name))
    {
         filesToIgnore.Remove(file.Name);
         return; 
    }

    // Code to execute when user saves the file
}

This approach assumes that OnCreated() will be always triggered before OnChanged().

1
  • You may need to fine-tune your FSW's NotifyFilter. Actually, you just need two: [FSW].NotifyFilter = NotifyFilters.FileName | NotifyFilters.LastWrite;. With these, you'll be notified when a file is Created, Deleted, Renamed and Changed. Note that the Changed event is, most of the time (if not always) raised twice. When a file is first created, only the Created event is raised.
    – Jimi
    Apr 24, 2019 at 10:48
0

I added the following code in OnChanged handler, and it seems to be working as expected.

private void OnChanged(object source, FileSystemEventArgs file)
{
    if (file.ChangeType == WatcherChangeTypes.Created)
        return;

    FileInfo fileInfo = new FileInfo(file.FullPath);
    if (fileInfo.CreationTime == fileInfo.LastWriteTime)
        return; 

    // Handle the Changed event
    ...
}

However, I am not sure if I am missing something that will cause this to break. Any thoughts?

4
  • Yes. Use 2 different handlers for Created and Changed. I won't go much further in the comments, but you have race conditions here that you want to avoid at all costs (especially in multi-user environments). Also, remember to increase the FSW buffer size, it will spare you same headaches.
    – Jimi
    Apr 24, 2019 at 0:17
  • If you can post an answer explaining about race conditions and the buffer size, that would be great! Apr 24, 2019 at 0:18
  • A file can be Changed while the handle is still opened, this is likely to fail when the filestream hits the buffer, and you will get an event and the file will be still open
    – TheGeneral
    Apr 24, 2019 at 1:22
  • I'll think about. In short: the FSW events, when many are triggered, have the bad habit to pile up quickly. If you don't handle them properly (having different handlers is part of it) you'll end up losing/missing events. Increasing the buffer size (e.g., [FSW].InternalBufferSize = 32768;) decreases the chance to mis-handle an event. Another thing you want to avoid, is to code anything that manages the event consequences in-place (inside the handler). I usually enqueue the packaged event using a proxy method that throttle the data to threadpool Tasks for processing.
    – Jimi
    Apr 24, 2019 at 1:28
0

The extension method bellow allows handling events from user's actions only:

public static void OnChangedByUser(this FileSystemWatcher fsw,
    FileSystemEventHandler handler)
{
    const int TOLERANCE_MSEC = 100;
    object locker = new object();
    string fileName = null;
    Stopwatch stopwatch = new Stopwatch();
    fsw.Created += OnFileCreated;
    fsw.Changed += OnFileChanged;
    fsw.Disposed += OnDisposed;
    void OnFileCreated(object sender, FileSystemEventArgs e)
    {
        lock (locker)
        {
            fileName = e.Name;
            stopwatch.Restart();
        }
    }
    void OnFileChanged(object sender, FileSystemEventArgs e)
    {
        lock (locker)
        {
            if (e.Name == fileName && stopwatch.ElapsedMilliseconds < TOLERANCE_MSEC)
            {
                return; // Ignore this event
            }
        }
        handler.Invoke(sender, e);
    }
    void OnDisposed(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        fsw.Created -= OnFileCreated;
        fsw.Changed -= OnFileChanged;
        fsw.Disposed -= OnDisposed;
    }
}

Usage example:

var fsw = new FileSystemWatcher(DIR_NAME);
fsw.OnChangedByUser(File_ChangedByUser);
fsw.EnableRaisingEvents = true;

private static void File_ChangedByUser(object sender, FileSystemEventArgs e)
{
    // Handle the event
}
0

This is a sticky situation and there is not much you can do about it apart from checking if the file is locked (assuming it has a read or write lock):

public  bool IsFileLocked(string fileName)
{

   try
   {
      using (var stream = File.Open(fileName, FileMode.Open, FileAccess.Read, FileShare.None))
      {
         return false;
      }   
   }
   catch (IOException)
   {
      //the file is unavailable
      return true;
   }
}

The premise is when you get an update, you check if the file is locked, if it isn't then you can loosely assume it's been closed.

Some things to consider though:

  1. There could be a race condition when checking the file is locked, getting the all clear, and then finding out some other process has locked the file.
  2. I have used FileAccess.Read, so this doesn't fail on read only files.
  3. Events can be dropped from the FileSystemWatcher for various reasons, and it can't always be relied on in certain situation; read the documentation for the reasons why events can be dropped and how to fix them. In these cases, you could possible get away with a long poll and some logic to pick up any stragglers (depending on your situation).

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