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Aim: identify most recent browser window in macOS, and get the URL and title of its active tab as a Markdown link.

It's destined for an Alfred workflow triggered from other apps, but for now I'm just debugging the core of it in the Script Editor. I have both Safari and Chrome open, along with a number of other apps. From debugging I see it correctly lists all the open windows, but it never matches either of the if conditions. As further evidence, if I just use the tell application lines in isolation, the right results are returned. I'm sure this is dead simple.

set output to ""
tell application "System Events"
    set appNames to name of every application process whose visible is true
    repeat with appName in appNames
        if (appName = "Google Chrome") then
            using terms from application "Google Chrome"
                tell application appName to set currentTabTitle to title of active tab of front window
                tell application appName to set currentTabUrl to URL of active tab of front window
            end using terms from
            set output to "[" & currentTabTitle & "](" & currentTabUrl & ")"
            exit repeat
        else if (appName = "Safari") then
            using terms from application "Safari"
                tell application appName to set currentTabTitle to name of front document
                tell application appName to set currentTabUrl to URL of front document
            end using terms from
            set output to "[" & currentTabTitle & "](" & currentTabUrl & ")"
            exit repeat
        end if
    end repeat
end tell
return output
  • 1
    appName is not a text object, it's a list object, so (appName = "...") fails because they can never be equal. So, direct after repeat with appName in appNames add set appName to appName as text then e.g. if appName happens to be "Google Chrome" then if (appName = "Google Chrome") then can return true if applicable. The other thing is since you'd targeting e.g. "Google Chrome" and "Safari", you do not need to use using terms from ... just use tell application ... and get rid of tell application appName to and just use the e.g. set currentTabTitle to title of ..., etc. – user3439894 Apr 24 at 13:06
  • This works for me: paste.ee/p/KsxR6 – user3439894 Apr 24 at 13:10
  • 2
    To clarify the nature of appName: it can look like a list object because it's an item in a list stored as a reference, and AppleScript list objects can be recursively self-referential. The underlying value is still just a list item. The reason coercing to text works is because any form of coercion forces a dereferencing of the data. Another, perhaps safer way to do so (in a general context where the underlying data type was not necessarily known), is to retrieve its contents: if (appName's contents = "Google Chrome") then.... – CJK Apr 24 at 13:30
  • 2
    On a general note about the script, the assumption here is that AppleScript returns the list of processes in an order mirroring when an application was most recently at the front, but this isn't the case. I'm not sure what determines the order of the process list, but you can do a simple test to compare the list returned at on instant against the list compared at another when you switch application. – CJK Apr 24 at 13:39
  • @CJK, Good points! :) – user3439894 Apr 24 at 13:45
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As discussed in the comments, the assumption your script makes is that AppleScript will return a list of processes ordered by the application which most recently had focus, but this isn't the case.

However, you can retrieve a list of application names in this order using a shell command lsappinfo metainfo. Piping this through a few additional commands to isolate the information of interest and clean up the text:

lsappinfo metainfo \
    | grep bringForwardOrder \
    | grep -E -o '"[^"]+"' \
    | tr -d "\""

produces a nice, readable, ordered list of applications, where each item in the last was last active more recently than the one below it:

Google Chrome
Script Editor
Atom
Messages
WhatsApp
Finder
Safari
Script Debugger
WebTorrent

Testing this, when I switch to Script Editor, and then run the shell command again, the list returned is:

Script Editor
Google Chrome
Atom
Messages
WhatsApp
Finder
Safari
Script Debugger
WebTorrent

Since you're only interested in discerning this order between two specific applications, namely Safari and Google Chrome, the shell command can be simplified somewhat to:

lsappinfo metainfo | grep -E -o 'Safari|Google Chrome' | head -1

which will return a single name, that being the browser that is either currently active or most recently had focus; or an empty string if, say, neither browser is running.

Incorporating this into your AppleScript, and cleaning the script up somewhat:

property nil : ""

set [currentTabTitle, currentTabUrl] to [nil, nil]

set cmd to "lsappinfo metainfo | grep -E -o 'Safari|Google Chrome' | head -1"
set frontmostBrowser to do shell script cmd

if the frontmostBrowser = "" then return nil

if the frontmostBrowser = "Google Chrome" then

    tell application "Google Chrome" to tell ¬
        (a reference to the front window) to tell ¬
        (a reference to its active tab)

        if not (it exists) then return nil
        set currentTabTitle to its title
        set currentTabUrl to its URL
    end tell

else if the frontmostBrowser = "Safari" then

    tell application "Safari" to tell ¬
        (a reference to the front document)

        if not (it exists) then return nil
        set currentTabTitle to its name
        set currentTabUrl to its URL
    end tell

end if

return "[" & currentTabTitle & "](" & currentTabUrl & ")"

However, I would suggest actually composing the script as a shell script. I believe a shell script will be faster than an AppleScript, because the AppleScript will take more time to spawn a shell process and run a shell script than the shell would take to compile and run an AppleScript (in this instance—although, generally, osascript is typically slower than a native AppleScript process). The other benefit is that, with the use of shell variable substitutions, we can make the resulting script a lot more compact, condensing the two browser AppleScript code blocks into a single, dual-purpose text script that osascript will compile once the variable substitutions have been made (thus avoiding the runtime/compile-time malarky I mentioned in the comments).

The shell (bash) script looks like this:

browser=$(lsappinfo metainfo | grep -E -o 'Safari|Google Chrome' | head -1)
[[ "$browser" = "Safari" ]] && syntax="current" || syntax="active"

script="tell app \"$browser\" to tell ¬
        (a reference to the front window) to tell ¬
        (a reference to its $syntax tab)

        if not (it exists) then return \"\"
        \"[\" & its name & \"](\" & its URL & \")\"
end tell"

[[ -n "$browser" ]] && osascript <<< "$script" || echo ""
  • Thank you so much, @CJK. Good to know about lsappinfo. The penultimate script runs fine in Apple's ScriptEditor, and 'm now trying to get it to run in the 'NSAppleScript' component of an Alfred workflow. I may have to take the last script and break it up and apply into the various different components for Alfred. – JGC Apr 27 at 21:52
  • Are you using NSAppleScript for a specific reason? If not, then don’t use it; use the regular script action, and select the script type from the drop down menu when the panel appears. For AppleScript, you’ll want one that says osascript. For the shell script, which I would recommend using above the AppleScript one, look for bash. – CJK Apr 27 at 22:10
  • this is actually going in an Alfred app workflow, so it can be triggered by simple key-combinations or triggers. (In my case \\url.) In Alfred it's easier to use and debug NSAppleScript (I think). There is an osascript option, though. – JGC Apr 29 at 22:36

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