3

I am trying to get the last inserted Id from database via Entity Framework, however my problem is somehow unique and I am not able to find any solution, but to rewrite my whole infrastructure and business layer, so all my Ids are Guids, which I am able to create manually, or get last record with another database call after commit.

Here is the problem. I have a three-layered architecture, where I am using UoW, repository, services and facades. I will show my code from top to bottom, so you can understand.

Here is my facade, where uow.Commit is calling SaveChanges()

public async Task<int> RegisterUserAsync(UserCreateDto user)
{
        using (var uow = UnitOfWorkProvider.Create())
        {
            var id = _userService.Create(user);
            await uow.Commit();
            return id;
        }
}

As you can see I am sending only my DTO into the service, where I process is like this, also I am mapping inside service

public virtual int Create(TCreateDto entityDto)
{
        var entity = Mapper.Map<TEntity>(entityDto);
        Repository.Create(entity);
        return entity.Id;
}

and finally my repository looks like this

public TKey Create(TEntity entity)
{
        Context.Set<TEntity>().Add(entity);
        return entity.Id;
}

Is there some elegant solution to this? Like I said my only idea is to switch all Ids to Guid or second call for Id after commit, which I find as not very good solution, because when I want to connect two or more tables in one transaction it would be impossible.

  • I think there should be a way to let your DB to handle the GUID creation. – diogenesgg Apr 24 '19 at 18:12
  • 1
    Guid creation is not a problem, you can let Db create it automatically, but in this scenario it would be more efficient to create it manually so you would know what Id you are inserting without the need of commit. But that is my fallback solution, I just want to know if there is a way to do it with Integer Id. – xpoproci Apr 24 '19 at 18:16
  • if you are fine with stored procedure then you can write some raw sql to return the inserted id using output clause – Steve Apr 24 '19 at 18:40
5

EF Core solution of the problem is simple - auto generated PK of an entity instance is available after calling SaveChanges[Async]. e.g.

var entity = Mapper.Map<TEntity>(entityDto);
Context.Add(entity);
// Here entity.Id contains auto-generated temporary value
// Other stuff...
Context.SaveChanges();
// Here entity.Id contains actual auto-generated value from the db

So the problem is more in the design of your infrastructure - all these (unnecessary) UoW, repository, services and facades simply hide that functionality.

The only relatively simple and elegant solution I see with your architecture is to change the service return type from int to Func<int>, e.g.

public virtual Func<int> Create(TCreateDto entityDto)
{
    var entity = Mapper.Map<TEntity>(entityDto);
    Repository.Create(entity);
    return () => entity.Id; // <--
}

Then in your façade you could use

public async Task<int> RegisterUserAsync(UserCreateDto user)
{
    using (var uow = UnitOfWorkProvider.Create())
    {
        var id = _userService.Create(user);
        await uow.Commit();
        return id(); // <-- the actual id!
    }
}

Edit:

Actually EF Core provides another option which would allow you to keep your current design intact - the HiLo key generation strategy, but only if the database provider supports it. I can say for sure Microsoft.EntityFrameworkCore.SqlServer and Npgsql.EntityFrameworkCore.PostgreSQL do support it with respectively ForSqlServerUseSequenceHiLo and ForNpgsqlUseSequenceHiLo fluent APIs.

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  • Thanks, this was helpful, however there is still one catch. When I am inserting more than one entity that needs to reference each other in one transaction, this solution will still not provide Id I need add. I know EF got this funcionallity, but the reason I am doing it like this, is so I can swap ORM by changing minimum of code. – xpoproci Apr 25 '19 at 5:23
  • Lol, changing ORM will never be easy. Anyway, EF solves the problem with Ids by linking entities by navigation properties rather than by Ids. However I believe it allows you to use the temporary Id of an entity as FK in another entity inside one context transaction. SaveChanges updates all them accordingly. – Ivan Stoev Apr 25 '19 at 5:35

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