689

With React 16.8.6 (it was good on previous version 16.8.3), I get this error when I attempt to prevent an infinite loop on a fetch request:

./src/components/BusinessesList.js
Line 51:  React Hook useEffect has a missing dependency: 'fetchBusinesses'.
Either include it or remove the dependency array  react-hooks/exhaustive-deps

I've been unable to find a solution that stops the infinite loop. I want to stay away from using useReducer(). I did find this discussion [ESLint] Feedback for 'exhaustive-deps' lint rule #14920 where a possible solution is You can always // eslint-disable-next-line react-hooks/exhaustive-deps if you think you know what you're doing. I'm not confident in what I'm doing, so I haven't tried implementing it just yet.

I have this current setup, React hook useEffect runs continuously forever/infinite loop and the only comment is about useCallback() which I'm not familiar with.

How I'm currently using useEffect() (which I only want to run once in the beginning similar to componentDidMount()):

useEffect(() => {
    fetchBusinesses();
  }, []);
const fetchBusinesses = () => {
    return fetch("theURL", {method: "GET"}
    )
      .then(res => normalizeResponseErrors(res))
      .then(res => {
        return res.json();
      })
      .then(rcvdBusinesses => {
        // some stuff
      })
      .catch(err => {
        // some error handling
      });
  };
3
  • 12
    Since this question gets a lot of traffic, here is a link to Dan Abramov's blog where he explains useEffect and it's dependencies in detail.
    – chetan
    Feb 28, 2021 at 12:05
  • 2
    And a feature request so React improve useEffect API to avoid this issue, clearly separating effect triggers from effect dependencies: github.com/facebook/react/issues/22132 Since Next.js enabled linting as a default, this warning must appear million times a day everywhere in the world, this has to stop somehow.
    – Eric Burel
    Nov 24, 2021 at 12:59
  • 5
    Agreed, this is totally unclear from the official documentation. A library like React shouldn't need forums and blog posts to get it working.
    – Kokodoko
    Dec 8, 2021 at 16:50

21 Answers 21

606

If you aren't using fetchBusinesses method anywhere apart from the effect, you could simply move it into the effect and avoid the warning

useEffect(() => {
    const fetchBusinesses = () => {
       return fetch("theURL", {method: "GET"}
    )
      .then(res => normalizeResponseErrors(res))
      .then(res => {
        return res.json();
      })
      .then(rcvdBusinesses => {
        // some stuff
      })
      .catch(err => {
        // some error handling
      });
  };
  fetchBusinesses();
}, []);

If however you are using fetchBusinesses outside of render, you must note two things

  1. Is there any issue with you not passing fetchBusinesses as a method when it's used during mount with its enclosing closure?
  2. Does your method depend on some variables which it receives from its enclosing closure? This is not the case for you.
  3. On every render, fetchBusinesses will be re-created and hence passing it to useEffect will cause issues. So first you must memoize fetchBusinesses if you were to pass it to the dependency array.

To sum it up I would say that if you are using fetchBusinesses outside of useEffect you can disable the rule using // eslint-disable-next-line react-hooks/exhaustive-deps otherwise you can move the method inside of useEffect

To disable the rule you would write it like

useEffect(() => {
   // other code
   ...

   // eslint-disable-next-line react-hooks/exhaustive-deps
}, []) 
18
  • 67
    I used the solution you outlined nicely. Another solution that I used else where because of a different setup wasuseCallback(). So for example: const fetchBusinesses= useCallback(() => { ... }, [...]) and the useEffect() would look like this: useEffect(() => { fetchBusinesses(); }, [fetchBusinesses]);
    – russ
    Apr 25, 2019 at 22:39
  • 6
    @russ, you are correct, you would need to memoize fetchBusiness using useCallback if you are to pass it to dependency array Apr 26, 2019 at 5:41
  • 44
    using // eslint-disable-next-line react-hooks/exhaustive-deps to explain to the linter that your code is correct is like a hack. I expect they will find another solution to make the linter smarter enough to detect when an argument is not mandatory Oct 27, 2019 at 11:59
  • 3
    @TapasAdhikary, yes you can have a async function in useEffect, you just need to write it differently. Please check stackoverflow.com/questions/53332321/… Nov 20, 2019 at 5:19
  • 17
    the linter is still dumb today, and if you want componentDidMount-like behaviour while using outside variables (needing some but not all of them to trigger a rerender if they change), you get that warning no matter what you do.... at least I wasn't able to find a solution online
    – rayaqin
    Apr 9, 2021 at 14:01
364

There are very good options for state management librariess if you are creating a new app or have enough flexibility. Check out Recoil.

Just for completeness:

1. (Stopped working) Use function as useEffect callback

useEffect(fetchBusinesses, [])

2. Declare function inside useEffect()

useEffect(() => {
  function fetchBusinesses() {
    ...
  }
  fetchBusinesses()
}, [])

3. Memoize with useCallback()

In this case, if you have dependencies in your function, you will have to include them in the useCallback dependencies array and this will trigger the useEffect again if the function's params change. Besides, it is a lot of boilerplate... So just pass the function directly to useEffect as in 1. useEffect(fetchBusinesses, []).

const fetchBusinesses = useCallback(() => {
  ...
}, [])
useEffect(() => {
  fetchBusinesses()
}, [fetchBusinesses])

4. Function's default argument

As suggested by Behnam Azimi

It's not best practice, but it could be useful in some cases.

useEffect((fetchBusinesses = fetchBusinesses) => {
   fetchBusinesses();
}, []);

5. Create a custom hook

Create a custom hook and call it when you need to run function only once. It may be cleaner. You can also return a callback to reset re-run the "initialization" when need.

// customHooks.js
const useInit = (callback, ...args) => {
  const [mounted, setMounted] = useState(false)
  
  const resetInit = () => setMounted(false)

  useEffect(() => {
     if(!mounted) {
        setMounted(true);
        callback(...args);
     }
  },[mounted, callback]);

  return [resetInit]
}

// Component.js
return ({ fetchBusiness, arg1, arg2, requiresRefetch }) => {
  const [resetInit] = useInit(fetchBusiness, arg1, arg2)

  useEffect(() => {
    resetInit()
  }, [requiresRefetch, resetInit]);

6. Disable eslint's warning

Disabling warnings should be your last resort, but when you do, better do it inline and explicitly, because future developers may be confused or create unexpected bugs without knowing linting is off

useEffect(() => {
  fetchBusinesses()
}, []) // eslint-disable-line react-hooks/exhaustive-deps
15
  • 4
    Is disbaling the eslint's warning okay todo? Sep 2, 2020 at 13:48
  • 31
    I prefer disabling warnings as last resort, because future developers may be confused or create unexpected bugs without knowing linting is off
    – jpenna
    Sep 2, 2020 at 18:12
  • 3
    useEffect(fetchBusinesses, []) will throw "TypeError: An effect function must not return anything besides a function, which is used for clean-up. " since fetchBusinesses returns a promise. Dec 16, 2020 at 19:49
  • 2
    The first suggestion does not eliminate the warning surprisingly
    – ericjam
    Mar 31, 2021 at 14:42
  • 1
    @LewyBlue that's because you added the comment above the dependencies line
    – jpenna
    Dec 27, 2021 at 12:46
158
./src/components/BusinessesList.js
Line 51:  React Hook useEffect has a missing dependency: 'fetchBusinesses'.
Either include it or remove the dependency array  react-hooks/exhaustive-deps

It's not a JavaScript/React error, but an ESLint (eslint-plugin-react-hooks) warning.

It's telling you that the hook depends on function fetchBusinesses, so you should pass it as a dependency.

useEffect(() => {
  fetchBusinesses();
}, [fetchBusinesses]);

It could result in invoking the function on every render if the function is declared in a component like:

const Component = () => {
  /*...*/

  // New function declaration every render
  const fetchBusinesses = () => {
    fetch('/api/businesses/')
      .then(...)
  }

  useEffect(() => {
    fetchBusinesses();
  }, [fetchBusinesses]);

  /*...*/
}

because every time the function is redeclared with a new reference.

The correct way of doing this stuff is:

const Component = () => {
  /*...*/

  // Keep the function reference
  const fetchBusinesses = useCallback(() => {
    fetch('/api/businesses/')
      .then(...)
  }, [/* Additional dependencies */])

  useEffect(() => {
    fetchBusinesses();
  }, [fetchBusinesses]);

  /*...*/
}

Or just define the function in useEffect.

More: [ESLint] Feedback for 'exhaustive-deps' lint rule #14920

2
  • 2
    the solution is fine and if on the function you modify another state you have to add the dependecies to avoid another unexpected behavior Jan 9, 2020 at 19:12
  • 1
    I would agree this is a solution to get rid of the linter warning. But I cannot understand WHY the linter is throwing a warning. Because all you're doing anyways is curing the symptoms of an non-existent disease. The dependency array is used by react to determine when to execute the function passed to useEffect, so passing in fetchBusinesses in this case shouldn't be necessary imo. Please do correct me if I'm wrong. Apr 29 at 10:59
24

These warnings are very helpful for finding components that do not update consistently: Is it safe to omit functions from the list of dependencies?.

However, if you want to remove the warnings throughout your project, you can add this to your ESLint configuration:

  {
  "plugins": ["react-hooks"],
  "rules": {
    "react-hooks/exhaustive-deps": 0
    }
  }
21

The solution is also given by React. They advice you use useCallback which will return a memoize version of your function:

The 'fetchBusinesses' function makes the dependencies of the useEffect Hook (at line NN) change on every render. To fix this, wrap the 'fetchBusinesses' definition into its own useCallback() Hook react-hooks/exhaustive-deps

useCallback is simple to use as it has the same signature as useEffect. The difference is that useCallback returns a function. It would look like this:

 const fetchBusinesses = useCallback( () => {
        return fetch("theURL", {method: "GET"}
    )
    .then(() => { /* Some stuff */ })
    .catch(() => { /* Some error handling */ })
  }, [/* deps */])
  // We have a first effect that uses fetchBusinesses
  useEffect(() => {
    // Do things and then fetchBusinesses
    fetchBusinesses();
  }, [fetchBusinesses]);
   // We can have many effects that use fetchBusinesses
  useEffect(() => {
    // Do other things and then fetchBusinesses
    fetchBusinesses();
  }, [fetchBusinesses]);
1
  • 1
    In my case this useCallBack hook solved my problem. To see in detail visit documentation
    – khan
    Sep 8, 2021 at 18:36
12
const [mount, setMount] = useState(false)
const fetchBusinesses = () => {
   // Function definition
}
useEffect(() => {
   if(!mount) {
      setMount(true);
      fetchBusinesses();
   }
},[fetchBusinesses, mount]);

This is solution is pretty simple and you don't need to override ESLint warnings. Just maintain a flag to check whether the component is mounted or not.

2
  • 1
    And you will do this every time when you need to componentDidMount ? Dec 14, 2020 at 10:29
  • 1
    This will then flag you that you need to add mount as a dependency of useEffect.
    – Preston
    Sep 15, 2021 at 20:40
9

Just disable ESLint for the next line;

useEffect(() => {
   fetchBusinesses();
// eslint-disable-next-line
}, []);

In this way, you are using it just like a component did mount (called once).

updated

or

const fetchBusinesses = useCallback(() => {
 // Your logic in here
 }, [someDeps])

useEffect(() => {
   fetchBusinesses();
// No need to skip the ESLint warning
}, [fetchBusinesses]);

fetchBusinesses will be called every time someDeps changes.

7
  • instead of disabling, just doing this: [fetchBusinesses] will automatically remove the warning and that solved the issue for me. Jun 3, 2019 at 7:33
  • 13
    @RotimiBest - doing this causes an infinite re-render as described in the question
    – user210757
    Jun 18, 2019 at 21:43
  • I actually did it this way in one of my projects a while ago and it didn't produce an infinite loop. I will check again though. Jun 19, 2019 at 10:35
  • 2
    @user210757 Wait but why will it cause an infinite loop, its not like you are setting the state after fetching the data from the server. If you were updating the state the just write an if condition before calling the function in useEffect that checks if the state is empty. Jan 25, 2020 at 5:51
  • @rotimi-best been ahwile since I commented but I would say the function is re-created every time thus never the same so will always re-render, unless you move into the useEffect body or useCallback
    – user210757
    Jan 26, 2020 at 18:34
8

This article is a good primer on fetching data with hooks: https://www.robinwieruch.de/react-hooks-fetch-data/

Essentially, include the fetch function definition inside useEffect:

useEffect(() => {
  const fetchBusinesses = () => {
    return fetch("theUrl"...
      // ...your fetch implementation
    );
  }

  fetchBusinesses();
}, []);
5

Actually the warnings are very useful when you develop with hooks. But in some cases, it can needle you. Especially when you do not need to listen for dependencies change.

If you don't want to put fetchBusinesses inside the hook's dependencies, you can simply pass it as an argument to the hook's callback and set the main fetchBusinesses as the default value for it like this:

useEffect((fetchBusinesses = fetchBusinesses) => {
   fetchBusinesses();
}, []);

It's not best practice, but it could be useful in some cases.

Also, as Shubham wrote, you can add the below code to tell ESLint to ignore the checking for your hook.

// eslint-disable-next-line react-hooks/exhaustive-deps
5

You try this way:

const fetchBusinesses = () => {
    return fetch("theURL", {method: "GET"})
        .then(res => normalizeResponseErrors(res))
        .then(res => {
            return res.json();
        })
        .then(rcvdBusinesses => {
            // Some stuff
        })
        .catch(err => {
            // Some error handling
        });
  };

and

useEffect(() => {
    fetchBusinesses();
});

It works for you.

But my suggestion is try this way and it also works for you. It's better than the previous way. I use it this way:

useEffect(() => {
    const fetchBusinesses = () => {
        return fetch("theURL", {method: "GET"})
            .then(res => normalizeResponseErrors(res))
            .then(res => {
                return res.json();
            })
            .then(rcvdBusinesses => {
                // Some stuff
            })
            .catch(err => {
                // Some error handling
            });
    };

    fetchBusinesses();
}, []);

If you get data on the base of a specific id, then add in callback useEffect [id]. Then it cannot show you the warning React Hook useEffect has a missing dependency: 'any thing'. Either include it or remove the dependency array

2

You can remove the second argument type array [], but the fetchBusinesses() will also be called on every update. You can add an IF statement into the fetchBusinesses() implementation if you like.

React.useEffect(() => {
  fetchBusinesses();
});

The other one is to implement the fetchBusinesses() function outside your component. Just don't forget to pass any dependency arguments to your fetchBusinesses(dependency) call, if any.

function fetchBusinesses (fetch) {
  return fetch("theURL", { method: "GET" })
    .then(res => normalizeResponseErrors(res))
    .then(res => res.json())
    .then(rcvdBusinesses => {
      // some stuff
    })
    .catch(err => {
      // some error handling
    });
}

function YourComponent (props) {
  const { fetch } = props;

  React.useEffect(() => {
    fetchBusinesses(fetch);
  }, [fetch]);

  // ...
}
1
  • removing the dependancy array brackets caused a problem of infinite re-render in the component where i have a form ! Jun 25, 2021 at 2:04
2

Well, if you want to look into this differently, you just need to know what options React has that are non exhaustive-deps. One of the reason you should not use a closure function inside the effect is on every render, it will be recreated/destroyed again.

So there are multiple React methods in hooks that are considered stable and non-exhausted where you do not have to apply to the useEffect dependencies, and in turn will not break the rules engagement of react-hooks/exhaustive-deps. For example, the second return variable of useReducer or useState which is a function.

const [,dispatch] = useReducer(reducer, {});

useEffect(() => {
    dispatch(); // Non-exhausted - ESLint won't nag about this
}, []);

So in turn, you can have all your external dependencies coexist with your current dependencies within your reducer function.

const [,dispatch] = useReducer((current, update) => {
    const { foobar } = update;
    // Logic

    return { ...current, ...update };
}), {});

const [foobar, setFoobar] = useState(false);

useEffect(() => {
    dispatch({ foobar }); // non-exhausted `dispatch` function
}, [foobar]);
2

In my case, it had this warning with my local variable organization, and when I put organization in the dependency array, useEffect would fetch infinitely. Therefore if you have some problems like mine, use useEffect with the dependency array and split:

Because if you have multiple API calls that modify state, it invokes useEffect multiple times.

From:

  const { organization } = useSelector(withOrganization)
  const dispatch = useDispatch()

  useEffect(() => {
    dispatch(getOrganization({}))
    dispatch(getSettings({}))
    dispatch(getMembers({}))
  }, [dispatch, organization])

To:

  const { organization } = useSelector(withOrganization)
  const dispatch = useDispatch()

  useEffect(() => {
    dispatch(getOrganization({}))
    dispatch(getSettings({}))
  }, [dispatch, organization])

  useEffect(() => {
    dispatch(getMembers({}))
  }, [dispatch])
1

This warning happens, if variables that you are using inside useEffect are defined inside the component or passed to the component as a prop. Since you defined fetchBusinesses() inside same component, you have to pass it to the dependency array.

But if you imported fetchBusinesses() and then used it inside useEffect, you would not need to add it to the dependency array. That is how we actually set up our Redux applications: we always import our action creators and run it inside useEffect without adding it to the dependency array.

The same is true for useMemo too.

3
  • 2
    you still get the warning even if you import the function from your store. Because your functions will be passed to the props object through mapDispatchToProps call or by using the connect tag's second argument. connect(mapStateToProps, {fetchBusinesses})(Component) Aug 24, 2021 at 7:59
  • @osmancakirio Did you find a resolution to the warning in this case? I have the same problem...
    – ndtreviv
    Oct 28, 2021 at 14:12
  • 1
    @ndtreviv I refactored the components to use redux-hooks now instead of connect tag. then I give the dispatch function to the dependency array. It is also recommended by the redux devs since as they say it is safe to do this because the reference to the dispatch function almost never changes. Nov 3, 2021 at 16:19
1

You can get rid of this Es-lint warning by passing a reference to it:

Example mentioned below, however you can watch the solution on this link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r4A46oBIwZk&t=8s

Warning: Line 13:8: React Hook React.useEffect has missing dependencies: 'history' and 'currentUser?.role'. Either include them or remove the dependency array react-hooks/exhaustive-deps

React.useEffect(() => {
    if (currentUser?.role !== "Student") {
        return history.push("/")
    }
}, [])

Resolution: Step 1: Move business logic it to separate const.

Now the warning is: React Hook React.useEffect has a missing dependency: 'roleChecking'.

const roleChecking = () =>{
   if (currentUser?.role !== "Student") {
        return history.push("/")
    }
}

React.useEffect(() => {
    roleChecking()
}, [])

Last step is to create a reference to the function:

  const roleRef = React.useRef();

  const roleChecking = () => {
    if (currentUser?.role !== "Student") {
      return history.push("/");
    }
  };
  roleRef.current = roleChecking;

  React.useEffect(() => {
   return roleRef.current();
  }, [currentUser?.role]);
1

It seems the fetchBusinesses function declared in the component. It means in every render it declares new function which triggers the hook.

There are 2 approaches to fix the issue.

  1. Move the fetchBusinesses function declaration out of component.

  2. Wrap the fetchBusinesses function with useCallback hook.

First option is preferable.

1

This is not an answer specific to the question use case but more general case, and cover the case when useEffect or extract and import is not warking. The useRef senario:

Sometimes the scenario is that useEffect should have the empty array and you still want to use inside the useEffect parts of the state but still you don't want inject them as dependencies, also you might tried the useCallback and now react is complains about the dependencies of the useCallback and you stuck. In this case in some cases you can use useRef. for example:

const locationRef = useRef(location);
useEffect(()=>{
const qs = locationRef.current.search
...
},[])

You should be careful when using this technique and be aware of that useRef is not activate a render process.

0

Just pass the function as the argument in the array of useEffect...

useEffect(() => {
   functionName()
}, [functionName])
0

using UseEffect fetchBusinesses calling function declare in useEffect() by declaring a const variable after that calling the name of the function,

useEffect(()=>{
const fetchBusinesses=()=>{
   console.log(useeffect fetchbussinesses functions)
}
 fetchBusinesses();
},[declare the variable used in useeffect hooks ])
0

You are making use of useEffect and when you do that, very frequently you want to make use of some variables that are used as props or state inside your component.

There is a rule built into eslint that wants you to reference any different prop or piece of state inside of the useEffect dependency array. That's the array that controls when useEffect gets executed. That rule wants to see it listed inside that array which decides when to re-run the useEffect function.

So you would need to add in [fetchBusinesses] and the warning should be gone.

Now, why does that rule wants us to put that in there?

There are some scenarios where making use of useEffect and not properly listing out all the pieces of state and props inside the array can lead to weird and hard to debug problems.

So this rule is to help avoid those hard to understand problems that can come up with useEffect.

Now, arbitrarily adding to that array can lead to bugs as well. So either way you are running into bugs you have to solve. According to your comments that seemed to solve it for you, but I would have wanted to investigate further to see if you by any chance got a second GET request in your Network tab in Chrome after adding in the fetchBusinesses function to your useEffect array.

0

Search for the keywords to learn more about each warning. To ignore, add // eslint-disable-next-line to the line before.

For Example: The function used in useEffect is causing warning

useEffect(() => {
  handleConnectWallet();
}, []);

To ignore the warning we simply add "// eslint-disable-next-line" before the warning line i.e.

useEffect(() => {
  handleConnectWallet();
  // eslint-disable-next-line
}, []);

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