206

How could I go about finding the division remainder of a number in Python?

For example:
If the number is 26 and divided number is 7, then the division remainder is 5.
(since 7+7+7=21 and 26-21=5.)

1
  • I'd suggest looking up the modulo operator
    – yurib
    Apr 7, 2011 at 16:49

13 Answers 13

256

you are looking for the modulo operator:

a % b

for example:

>>> 26 % 7
5

Of course, maybe they wanted you to implement it yourself, which wouldn't be too difficult either.

2
  • 14
    Note that the modulo operator always returns a positive number, so for negative numbers it might not be what you would expect when talking about the remainder: -10 % 3 == 2. However a/b*b + a%b == a still holds true, since python always rounds towards -Infinity, unlike some other languages, which round towards 0 but would return -1.
    – marcelj
    Oct 1, 2014 at 12:54
  • 6
    That's because Python's % performs a true modulus, which returns values on the range [0, divisor) and pairs well with floored division (towards negative infinity). C languages use the % operator for remainder operations which returns values on the range (-divisor, divisor) and pairs well with standard division (towards zero). May 19, 2018 at 6:53
226

The remainder of a division can be discovered using the operator %:

>>> 26%7
5

In case you need both the quotient and the modulo, there's the builtin divmod function:

>>> seconds= 137
>>> minutes, seconds= divmod(seconds, 60)
0
67

26 % 7 (you will get remainder)

26 / 7 (you will get divisor, can be float value)

26 // 7 (you will get divisor, only integer value)

1
  • 2
    Is it possible to get both in a single line? divisor, remainder = 26 <operation symbol> 7
    – Guimoute
    Mar 15 at 17:50
36

If you want to get quotient and remainder in one line of code (more general usecase), use:

quotient, remainder = divmod(dividend, divisor)
#or
divmod(26, 7)
1
  • An easier way to compute quotient is to use the //. quotient = dividend // divisor
    – Pedram
    Jan 17, 2021 at 10:52
20

From Python 3.7, there is a new math.remainder() function:

from math import remainder
print(remainder(26,7))

Output:

-2.0  # not 5

Note, as above, it's not the same as %.

Quoting the documentation:

math.remainder(x, y)

Return the IEEE 754-style remainder of x with respect to y. For finite x and finite nonzero y, this is the difference x - n*y, where n is the closest integer to the exact value of the quotient x / y. If x / y is exactly halfway between two consecutive integers, the nearest even integer is used for n. The remainder r = remainder(x, y) thus always satisfies abs(r) <= 0.5 * abs(y).

Special cases follow IEEE 754: in particular, remainder(x, math.inf) is x for any finite x, and remainder(x, 0) and remainder(math.inf, x) raise ValueError for any non-NaN x. If the result of the remainder operation is zero, that zero will have the same sign as x.

On platforms using IEEE 754 binary floating-point, the result of this operation is always exactly representable: no rounding error is introduced.

Issue29962 describes the rationale for creating the new function.

1
  • math.remainder may not work the way you expect example for python 3.7 >>> math.remainder(-2.99,2) -0.9900000000000002 >>> math.remainder(-3,2) 1.0 Apr 14, 2020 at 17:05
18

If you want to avoid modulo, you can also use a combination of the four basic operations :)

26 - (26 // 7 * 7) = 5
4

Use the % instead of the / when you divide. This will return the remainder for you. So in your case

26 % 7 = 5
4

We can solve this by using modulus operator (%)

26 % 7 = 5;

but 26 / 7 = 3 because it will give quotient but % operator will give remainder.

1
  • 3
    If you use Python 2, 26 / 7 = 3 , for Python 3, 26/7 is about 3.7142857142857144
    – Antti A
    May 14, 2018 at 7:00
3

Modulo would be the correct answer, but if you're doing it manually this should work.

num = input("Enter a number: ")
div = input("Enter a divisor: ")

while num >= div:
    num -= div
print num
1
2

You can find remainder using modulo operator Example

a=14
b=10
print(a%b)

It will print 4

1
  • This answer is misleading, the question was explicitly asking "remainder". Python uses module for % operator, what is mathematically different. More info here: stackoverflow.com/questions/4432208/…
    – mTheSame
    Oct 4, 2021 at 12:29
0

If you want the remainder of your division problem, just use the actual remainder rules, just like in mathematics. Granted this won't give you a decimal output.

valone = 8
valtwo = 3
x = valone / valtwo
r = valone - (valtwo * x)
print "Answer: %s with a remainder of %s" % (x, r)

If you want to make this in a calculator format, just substitute valone = 8 with valone = int(input("Value One")). Do the same with valtwo = 3, but different vairables obviously.

1
  • you have to cast valone/valtwo to int. else it will result in a float number. Jan 2, 2019 at 9:02
0

Here's an integer version of remainder in Python, which should give the same results as C's "%" operator:

def remainder(n, d):
    return (-1 if n < 0 else 1) * (abs(n) % abs(d))

Expected results:

remainder(123, 10)   ==  3
remainder(123, -10)  ==  3
remainder(-123, 10)  == -3
remainder(-123, -10) == -3
-1

you can define a function and call it remainder with 2 values like rem(number1,number2) that returns number1%number2 then create a while and set it to true then print out two inputs for your function holding number 1 and 2 then print(rem(number1,number2)

1
  • 1
    Please add a working example. Explaining some theoretical code might be hard to understand.
    – mischva11
    Jun 25, 2020 at 12:22

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