1

Here a sample text file:

word1 word2 word3 word4
word4 word5 word6 word7
word6 word7 word8 word9
word9 word6 word8 word3
word1 word4 word5 word4

What is command to extract lines with N common words with previous line ?

In sample file, extract lines with 3 common distinct words with previous line will output:

word9 word6 word8 word3

Note: this is easy to do with a programmatic language (extract array_sentence1.uniq & array_sentence2.uniq), but i search for a solution using sed/awk.

  • What have you tried so far? – oguz ismail Apr 25 at 12:53
  • I've fixed that up now but in fairness, @Thor's should be the accepted answer. – Alex Harvey Apr 25 at 14:19
  • 1
    @AlexHarvey: No worries – Thor Apr 26 at 0:27
1

Here is a solution in AWK:

▶ cat > FILE <<EOF
word1 word2 word3 word4
word4 word5 word6 word7
word6 word7 word8 word9
word9 word6 word8 word3
word1 word4 word5 word4
EOF

My original solution is here. It assumed that the words in each row were unique.

# script.awk

NR > 1 {                   # On lines other than the first:
  split(last, last_ar)     #   Split the last record and the
  split($0, curr_ar)       #   current record.

  found = 0                #   Count how many words curr_ar
  for (i in curr_ar)       #   and last_ar have in common.
    for (j in last_ar)
      if (last_ar[j] == curr_ar[i])
        found++

  if (found >= 3) print    #   ... and print this record
                           #   if 3 or more were found.
}

{
  last = $0                # On all lines.
} 

To handle uniqueness, I have this modified solution, that uses GNU AWK's length function, also in nawk on Mac OS X:

# script.gawk

NR > 1 {
  split(last, last_ar)
  split($0, curr_ar)

  delete found          # Count how many unique occurrences
  for (i in curr_ar)    # of words are seen.
    for (j in last_ar)
      if (last_ar[j] == curr_ar[i])
        found[curr_ar[i]]++

  if (length(found) >= 3) print
}

{
  last = $0
}

Testing:

▶ gawk -f script.gawk FILE
word9 word6 word8 word3
  • Well done Alex! – JoJo Apr 25 at 13:05
2
$ cat tst.awk
{
    delete seen
    cnt = 0
    for (i=1; i<=NF; i++) {
        word = $i
        cnt += ( !seen[word]++ && prev[word] ? 1 : 0 )
    }

    if (cnt >= 3) {
        print
    }

    delete prev
    for (word in seen) {
        prev[word]++
    }
}

$ awk -f tst.awk file
word9 word6 word8 word3
1

You can ensure unique values by using hashes, here is an example script:

parse.awk

# Only start checking from the second line
NR > 1 {
  c = 0        # Variable to hold the common word count

  # Run through unique words and compare to previous line
  for(i=1; i<=NF; i++) {
    if( $i in h && !($i in g) ) {
      c++
      g[$i]
    }
  }

  # Reset the associative arrays
  delete h
  delete g
}

# If we had enough matches print the current line
c >= N

# Collect current line into the h associative array
{
  for(i=1; i<=NF; i++)
    h[$i]
}

Run it like this:

awk -f parse.awk N=3 infile

Output:

word9 word6 word8 word3
  • Nice, should be the accepted answer. – Alex Harvey Apr 25 at 14:19
1

This might work for you (GNU sed):

sed -nE 'N;h;s/(.*)(\n.*)/\n\1 \2 /;:a;s/(\n(\S+\s+).*\n.*)\2/N\1/;s/\n\S+\s+/\n/;ta;/^N{3}/{g;s/.*\n//p};g;D' file

The solution consists of three parts:

Part One

A moving window of 2 lines is instigated.

A copy of the pristine pattern space is made containing the current 2 line window.

A newline is prepended to the pattern space and additional spaces added to the ends of both lines. The newline acts as delimiter for the unique word count and the spaces allow the final words in each line to match.

Part Two

A pattern matching loop is instigated in which the first word and its following whitespace is matched against any of the words in the second line. If a match is made that word is removed from the second line and a counter incremented before the introduced newline. The first word in the first line is removed and the process repeated until there are no further words in the first line.

The counter is checked for the required number of matches and if found to be true, the copy of the pattern space is refreshed, the first line is removed and the second line is printed.

Part Three

Regardless of the above, the pattern space is refreshed, the first line removed and the process repeated until the end of the file.

The above solution prints lines of N or more matches (in the above solution, N is set to 3 as in the OP's example) for N only matches use:

sed -nE 'N;h;s/(.*)(\n.*)/\n\1 \2 /;:a;s/(\n(\S+\s+).*\n.*)\2/N\1/;s/\n\S+\s+/\n/;ta;/^N{3}\n/{g;s/.*\n//p};g;D' file
0

One way:

$ awk '{x=0;for(i=1;i<=NF;i++)if ($i in a)x++;split("",a);for(i=1;i<=NF;i++){a[$i]};}x==3' file
word9 word6 word8 word3

Store the line contents in associative array. Then check the associative array and increment the counter x.

0

Alternative solution :

awk '{
       c=0; 
       for(i=1;i<=NF;i++)
       {
         if(l[$i]){c+=1}
       }
     }
     {
       delete l; 
       for(i=1;i<=NF;i++)
       {
         l[$i]=1
       }
     } 
     c>=3' <your file>
  • 1
    Never use a variable named l as it looks far too much line the number 1 and so obfuscates your code. – Ed Morton Apr 25 at 13:33
0
$ echo '
> word1 word2 word3 word4
> word4 word5 word6 word7
> word6 word7 word8 word9
> word9 word6 word8 word3
> word1 word4 word5 word4
> ' | awk -v n=3 '
> NR == 1 { for (i = 1; i <= NF; i++) { word[$i]++ } }
> NR >  1 { counter = 0
>           for (i = 1; i <= NF; i++) {
>               if (word[$i]-- > 0) counter++ }
>           if (counter >= n) print $0
>           delete word
>           for (i = 1; i <= NF; i++) { word[$i]++ } }
> '
word9 word6 word8 word3
0

if your data in d file, tried on gnu awk

awk 'NR==1{for(;i++<NF;)a[i]=$i;next} {for(i=0;i++<NF;){for(j in a){if($i==a[j])c++;if(c==3){print;exit}}}; c=0;i=length(a);NF+=i;for(j=0;i<NF;)a[++i]=$++j} ' d

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