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I'm using a custom C implementation of data structures from github. Documentation here: http://fragglet.github.io/c-algorithms/doc/

It's my first time with this low level HashTable usage and I'm getting some pointer problems when I recover the values that I previously inserted.

My code is just a simple test with just the necessary to insert and recover data.

#include "list.h"
#include "hash-table.h"
#include <stdio.h>

//typedef unsigned int (*HashTableHashFunc)(HashTableKey value);
unsigned int hashFunc(HashTableKey v_key)
{
    unsigned int *key = (unsigned int *)v_key;
    return *key % 20;
}

//typedef int (*HashTableEqualFunc)(HashTableKey value1, HashTableKey value2);
int equalFunc(HashTableKey value1, HashTableKey value2)
{
    int *key1 = (int *)value1;
    int *key2 = (int *)value2;
    return *key1 == *key2;
}

int main(int argc, char const *argv[])
{
    HashTable *mapMatrices;
    //ListEntry *posicionListaPeticiones;

    mapMatrices = hash_table_new(hashFunc, equalFunc);

    for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++)
    {
        int key = i;
        int value = i * 200;
        int stat = hash_table_insert(mapMatrices, &key, &value);
        if (!stat)
            printf("Error inserting key %i with value %i\n", key, value);
        else
            printf("Inserted key %i with value %i\n", key, value);
    }

    for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++)
    {
        int key = i;
        void *v_value = hash_table_lookup(mapMatrices, &key);
        int value = *(int *)v_value;
        printf("Key pointer %x : Value pointer %x\n", &key, &value);
    }
}

This is my output if I print the data addresses

Inserted key 0 with value 0
Inserted key 1 with value 200
Inserted key 2 with value 400
Inserted key 3 with value 600
Inserted key 4 with value 800
Inserted key 5 with value 1000
Inserted key 6 with value 1200
Inserted key 7 with value 1400
Inserted key 8 with value 1600
Inserted key 9 with value 1800
Key ed75a354 : Value pointer ed75a358
Key ed75a354 : Value pointer ed75a358
Key ed75a354 : Value pointer ed75a358
Key ed75a354 : Value pointer ed75a358
Key ed75a354 : Value pointer ed75a358
Key ed75a354 : Value pointer ed75a358
Key ed75a354 : Value pointer ed75a358
Key ed75a354 : Value pointer ed75a358
Key ed75a354 : Value pointer ed75a358
Key ed75a354 : Value pointer ed75a358

And this is what happens after I try to print the content of my addresses

printf("Key %i : Value pointer %i\n", key, value);
Inserted key 1 with value 200
Inserted key 2 with value 400
Inserted key 3 with value 600
Inserted key 4 with value 800
Inserted key 5 with value 1000
Inserted key 6 with value 1200
Inserted key 7 with value 1400
Inserted key 8 with value 1600
Inserted key 9 with value 1800
Segmentation fault (core dumped)

Implementation code of HashTable

HashTable *hash_table_new(HashTableHashFunc hash_func,
                          HashTableEqualFunc equal_func)
{
    HashTable *hash_table;

    /* Allocate a new hash table structure */

    hash_table = (HashTable *) malloc(sizeof(HashTable));

    if (hash_table == NULL) {
        return NULL;
    }

    hash_table->hash_func = hash_func;
    hash_table->equal_func = equal_func;
    hash_table->key_free_func = NULL;
    hash_table->value_free_func = NULL;
    hash_table->entries = 0;
    hash_table->prime_index = 0;

    /* Allocate the table */

    if (!hash_table_allocate_table(hash_table)) {
        free(hash_table);

        return NULL;
    }

    return hash_table;
}

int hash_table_insert(HashTable *hash_table, HashTableKey key,
                      HashTableValue value)
{
    HashTableEntry *rover;
    HashTablePair *pair;
    HashTableEntry *newentry;
    unsigned int index;

    /* If there are too many items in the table with respect to the table
     * size, the number of hash collisions increases and performance
     * decreases. Enlarge the table size to prevent this happening */

    if ((hash_table->entries * 3) / hash_table->table_size > 0) {

        /* Table is more than 1/3 full */

        if (!hash_table_enlarge(hash_table)) {

            /* Failed to enlarge the table */

            return 0;
        }
    }

    /* Generate the hash of the key and hence the index into the table */

    index = hash_table->hash_func(key) % hash_table->table_size;

    /* Traverse the chain at this location and look for an existing
     * entry with the same key */

    rover = hash_table->table[index];

    while (rover != NULL) {

        /* Fetch rover's HashTablePair entry */

        pair = &(rover->pair);

        if (hash_table->equal_func(pair->key, key) != 0) {

            /* Same key: overwrite this entry with new data */

            /* If there is a value free function, free the old data
             * before adding in the new data */

            if (hash_table->value_free_func != NULL) {
                hash_table->value_free_func(pair->value);
            }

            /* Same with the key: use the new key value and free
             * the old one */

            if (hash_table->key_free_func != NULL) {
                hash_table->key_free_func(pair->key);
            }

            pair->key = key;
            pair->value = value;

            /* Finished */

            return 1;
        }

        rover = rover->next;
    }

    /* Not in the hash table yet.  Create a new entry */

    newentry = (HashTableEntry *) malloc(sizeof(HashTableEntry));

    if (newentry == NULL) {
        return 0;
    }

    newentry->pair.key = key;
    newentry->pair.value = value;

    /* Link into the list */

    newentry->next = hash_table->table[index];
    hash_table->table[index] = newentry;

    /* Maintain the count of the number of entries */

    ++hash_table->entries;

    /* Added successfully */

    return 1;
}

HashTableValue hash_table_lookup(HashTable *hash_table, HashTableKey key)
{
    HashTableEntry *rover;
    HashTablePair *pair;
    unsigned int index;

    /* Generate the hash of the key and hence the index into the table */

    index = hash_table->hash_func(key) % hash_table->table_size;

    /* Walk the chain at this index until the corresponding entry is
     * found */

    rover = hash_table->table[index];

    while (rover != NULL) {
        pair = &(rover->pair);

        if (hash_table->equal_func(key, pair->key) != 0) {

            /* Found the entry.  Return the data. */

            return pair->value;
        }

        rover = rover->next;
    }

    /* Not found */

    return HASH_TABLE_NULL;
}
  • 1
    What are you expecting to happen? key and value are both local variables and their addresses aren't changing within the loop. Are you expecting their addresses to change? – Tyler Marshall Apr 25 at 19:40
  • I just added more info about my prints that show the real error. Sorry for my previous post – Marc G.G Apr 25 at 19:53
  • The seg fault while printing means some piece of memory is being overwritten and corrupted. Unfortunately, the write that corrupts the memory is allowed and you aren't getting the seg fault where the write actually happens. From here, you can either try to use something like valgrind or go through and double check all your types and calls. For instance, hash_table_new expects a "HashTableHashFunc" which should return a long, but the function you give hash_table_new returns an int. This mistake should only lead to bad hash insertion due to truncation though, not a seg fault.. – Tyler Marshall Apr 25 at 20:27
1

You have some pointer confusion going on. If you replace:

for (int i = 0; ...

with

int i;
for (i = 0; ...

for the first loop in main, and with:

for (i = 0;...

in the second loop, you will get the output you are expecting.

If you add this line to your equalFunc:

fprintf(stderr,"cmp %p/%d, %p/%d\n", key1, *key1, key2, *key2);

you will notice that the two parameters to equalFunc are always the same -- they in fact point at your local “i” variable. That is why this didn’t work with the two separate “i” values.

A momement with a debugger will show that:

void *v_value = hash_table_lookup(mapMatrices, &i);

returns NULL in your source [ie. not found ], but you go ahead and dereference it anyways.

To make your program proper, you should probably be passing your key by value, not reference:

int stat = hash_table_insert(mapMatrices, (int *)i, (int *)value);
...
void *v_value = hash_table_lookup(mapMatrices, (int *)i);
int value = (int )v_value;
...
/* equalFunc: */
return (int)value1 == (int)value2;

But for hygienic reasons, use intptr_t’s and extraneous casts less the evil god of undefined behaviour burn down your home.

  • Thanks, this helped me to solve my problem and get a better understanding of C pointers. – Marc G.G Apr 26 at 17:26

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