1

I am finding a bash command for a conditional replacement with offset. The existing posts that I've found are conditional replacement without offset or with a fixed offset.

Task: If uid contains 8964, then insert the line FORBIDDEN before DOB.

Each TXT file below represents one user, and it contains (in the following order)

  1. some property(ies)
  2. unique uid
  3. some quality(ies)
  4. unique DOB
  5. a random lorem ipsum

I hope I can transform the following files

# file1.txt (uid doens't match 8964)
admin: false
uid: 123456
happy
movie
DOB: 6543-02-10
lorem ipsum
seo varis lireccuni paccem noba sako

# file2.txt (uid matches 8964)
citizen: true
hasSEAcct: true
uid: 289641
joyful hearty
final debug Juno XYus
magazine
DOB: 1234-05-06
saadi torem lopez dupont

into

# file1.txt (uid doens't match 8964)
admin: false
uid: 123456
happy
movie
DOB: 6543-02-10
lorem ipsum
seo varis lireccuni paccem noba sako

# file2.txt (uid matches 8964)
citizen: true
hasSEAcct: true
uid: 289641
joyful hearty
final debug Juno XYus
magazine
FORBIDDEN
DOB: 1234-05-06
saadi torem lopez dupont

My try:

If uid contains 8964, then do a 2nd match with DOB, and insert FORBIDDEN above DOB.

sed '/^uid: [0-9]*8964[0-9]*$/{n;/^DOB: .*$/{iFORBIDDEN}}' file*.txt

This gives me an unmatched { error.

sed: -e expression #1, char 0: unmatched `{'

I know that sed '/PAT/{n;p}' will execute {n;p} if PAT is matched, but it seems impossible to put /PAT2/{iTEXT} inside /PAT/{ }.

How can I perform such FORBIDDEN insertion?

2
$ awk '
  /^uid/ && /8964/ {f=1}                     #1
  /^DOB/ && f {print "FORBIDDEN"; f=0}       #2
  1                                          #3
' file
  1. If a line starting with "uid" matches "8964", set flag
  2. If a line starts with "DOB" and flag is set, print string and unset flag
  3. print every line
$ awk -v RS='' '/uid: [0-9]*8964/{sub(/DOB/, "FORBIDDEN\nDOB")} 1' file

Alternatively, treat every block separated by a blank line as a single record, then sub in "FORBIDDEN\nDOB" if there's a match. I think the first one's better practice. As a very general rule, once you start thinking in terms of fields/records, it's time for awk/perl.

  • Thanks for answer. It really works. However, I don't know awk. Where can I learn the basics? I can't find "flag" in this famous awk tutorial. Why FORBIDDEN is printed before DOB and not after? I tried replacing 1 with 2 or 0.5 at line #3. What does 1 mean? – GNUSupporter 8964民主女神 地下教會 Apr 28 at 1:18
  • 1
    Don't be intimidated, it's just the next level up from Sed. Awk is also valuable as a teaching tool for C logic, so read man gawk. 1 (or more) is true, while 0 (or null) is false. "flag" isn't an official term, just the idea of a boolean variable that we turn "on" or "off" to keep tabs on a condition. When there's a condition with no {action}, like 1 all by itself, awk does the default behavior, which is {print $0} (print the whole line). – vintnes Apr 28 at 1:27
  • Thanks for response. I've gone through man awk on Ubuntu, and have a better idea about mawk. If I swap #2 and #3, I get FORBIDDEN after DOB. – GNUSupporter 8964民主女神 地下教會 Apr 28 at 5:14
1

In my opinion, this is a good use-case for sed.

Here is a GNU sed solution with some explanation:

# script.sed
/^uid:.*8964/,/DOB/ { # Search only inside this range, if it exists.
  /DOB/i FORBIDDEN    # Insert FORBIDDEN before the line matching /DOB/.
}

Testing:

▶ gsed -f script.sed FILE2 
citizen: true
hasSEAcct: true
uid: 289641
joyful hearty
final debug Juno XYus
magazine
FORBIDDEN
DOB: 1234-05-06
saadi torem lopez dupont
▶ gsed -f script.sed FILE1
admin: false
uid: 123456
happy
movie
DOB: 6543-02-10
lorem ipsum
seo varis lireccuni paccem noba sako

Or on one line:

▶ gsed -e '/^uid:.*8964/,/DOB/{/DOB/i FORBIDDEN' -e '}' FILE*
  • 1
    Nice answer! Regarding the one-line command, is there a reason for such separation? I only know that if the three expression are put together, there will be an unmatched { error. – GNUSupporter 8964民主女神 地下教會 Apr 28 at 12:59
  • 1
    @GNUSupporter8964民主女神地下教會, and nice question too by the way. The multiple -es are there because the i command expects "lines" of text to follow. AFAIK, the string to insert must be followed by a newline character, but the } still needs to close the { .. } block. So I don't know any other way to put it all on one line than to use multiple -es. – Alex Harvey Apr 28 at 13:55
  • See also the examples here gnu.org/software/sed/manual/sed.html#Other-Commands – Alex Harvey Apr 28 at 14:04
1

tried on gnu sed

 sed -Ee '/^uid:\s*\w*8964\w*$/{n;/^DOB:/iFORBIDDEN' -e '}' file*.txt

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