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I am struggling with this coming back from a long layoff.

I asked a question regarding the configuring of a DBContext in my generic base repository. Only after a user has logged in can I then construct a connection string so I cannot register a service in startup.cs - I have to use a constructor argument to instantiate my DBContext.

I got this answer which I thought would address the problem however I am getting an error in the following factory class:

public class ContextFactory<T> : IContextFactory<T> : where T : DbContext
{
    public T CreateDbContext(string connectionString)
    {
        var optionsBuilder = new DbContextOptionsBuilder<T>();
        optionsBuilder.UseSqlServer(connectionString);
        return new T(optionsBuilder.Options);
    }
}

The error is on the line return new T(optionsBuilder.Options); and is:

Cannot create an instance of the variable type 'T' because it does not have the new() constraint

  • 2
    even if you add new() constraint you end up with 'T': cannot provide arguments when creating an instance of a variable type. You were given invalid code. – Nkosi Apr 28 '19 at 2:11
5

Even if you add new() constraint, you will end up with the following error

'T': cannot provide arguments when creating an instance of a variable type.

You were given invalid code.

The new constraint specifies that any type argument in a generic class declaration must have a public parameterless constructor. To use the new constraint, the type cannot be abstract.

Reference new constraint (C# Reference)

Another option to consider could be to use Activator.CreateInstance (Type, Object[]).

Given

public interface IContextFactory<TContext> where TContext : DbContext {
    TContext Create(string connectionString);
}

You would implement it as follows

public class ContextFactory<TContext> : IContextFactory<TContext>
    where TContext : DbContext {

    public TContext Create(string connectionString) {
        var optionsBuilder = new DbContextOptionsBuilder<TContext>();
        optionsBuilder.UseSqlServer(connectionString);
        return (TContext)Activator.CreateInstance(typeof(TContext), optionsBuilder.Options);
    }
}

This could be refactored further to separate concerns

public class ContextFactory<TContext> : IContextFactory<TContext>
    where TContext : DbContext {

    public TContext Create(DbContextOptions<TContext> options) {
        return (TContext)Activator.CreateInstance(typeof(TContext), options);
    }
}

so that the builder will become the responsibility of where the factory is being used.

var connection = @"....";
var optionsBuilder = new DbContextOptionsBuilder<BloggingContext>();
optionsBuilder.UseSqlServer(connection);

//Assuming factory is `IContextFactory<BloggingContext>`    
using (var context = factory.Create(optionsBuilder.Options))
{
   // do stuff
}

EDIT

The factory can be registered as open generics in ConfigureServices method

services.AddSingleton(typeof(IContextFactory<>), typeof(ContextFactory<>));
| improve this answer | |
  • I think I need to register the factory in startup as a singleton - if so how? – si2030 Apr 28 '19 at 6:09
  • @Nkosi: Thanks for spotting the mistake in the code that I provided to answer Simon's original question. I have edited the answer to show how the factory can be registered as open generics. – Shahzad Hassan Apr 28 '19 at 21:49
  • @si2030 please have a look at the updated answer to the original question. – Shahzad Hassan Apr 28 '19 at 21:50
  • Thank you. However, this code did not work in my project. I coded it this way services.AddTransient(typeof(DatabaseContextFactory)); and it worked in my project – Nisanur Sep 1 at 20:21

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