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Clojure's Associative Destructuring allows one to destructure a vector, (and maybe a seq or list) by numeric index.

This pattern is not mentioned at clojure.org so far, but is mentioned in the The Joy of Clojure, 2nd ed. Michael Fogus, Chris Houser, May 2014, p. 59. There this approach appears in a section called "Associative Destructuring" - wrongly as this index-based destructuring this is just a special case of "Associative Destructuring", which in said book, is called "Destructuring with a map" instead.

Anyway, the results are unexpected (Clojure 1.10.0):

In all cases, extract values at index 0 and 3.

These work as expected:

(let [{firstthing 0, lastthing 3} [1 2 3 4]] [firstthing lastthing])
;=> [1 4]

(let [{firstthing 0, lastthing 3} (vec '(1 2 3 4))] [firstthing lastthing])
;=> [1 4]

But on a list:

(let [{firstthing 0, lastthing 3} '(1 2 3 4)] [firstthing lastthing])
;=> [nil 4]

Why is there nil at position 0?

Similarly:

(let [{firstthing 0, lastthing 3} (seq '(1 2 3 4))] [firstthing lastthing])
;=> [nil 4]

But on the other hand:

(let [{firstthing 0, lastthing 3} (vec (seq '(1 2 3 4)))] [firstthing lastthing])
;=> [1 4]

What's going on here?

Addendum:

(let [{firstthing 0, lastthing 3} { 1 2 3 4 } ] [firstthing lastthing])
;=> [nil 4]

... sounds reasonable as the map to be associatively destructed is actually {1 2, 3 4}. So the result of a lookup, not by position but by integer key (changing the meaning of the expression underneath our feet, so to say) would exactly be [nil 4]. Is anything that is not a vector poured into a map first?

(let [{firstthing 10, lastthing 30} (seq '(10 2 30 4))] [firstthing lastthing])
;=> [2 4]

It certainly looks like it....

(let [{firstthing 10, lastthing 30} (seq '(10 2 30 ))] [firstthing lastthing])
; Execution error (IllegalArgumentException) at user/eval367 (REPL:1).
; No value supplied for key: 30

Oh yeah.

  • 3
    It is certainly instructive to dig around in the implementation for the exact source of this behaviour, but simply: lists and seqs are not associative. (map associative? [{} [] ()]): (true true false). – glts Apr 28 '19 at 20:37
  • 1
    "Is anything that is not a vector poured into a map first?" Not quite - anything that is a seq gets poured into a map. – amalloy Apr 29 '19 at 2:47
5

Why is there nil at position 0?

(let [{firstthing 0, lastthing 3} '(1 2 3 4)] [firstthing lastthing])
;=> [nil 4]

If you look at the generated code for that let:

user=> (macroexpand '(let [{firstthing 0, lastthing 3} '(1 2 3 4)] [firstthing lastthing]))
(let*
  [map__8012 (quote (1 2 3 4))
   map__8012 (if (clojure.core/seq? map__8012)
               (clojure.lang.PersistentHashMap/create (clojure.core/seq map__8012))
               map__8012)
   firstthing (clojure.core/get map__8012 0)
   lastthing (clojure.core/get map__8012 3)]
  [firstthing lastthing])

You see, that in case of a seq? it will get converted to a map. So:

user=> (def map__8012 (quote (1 2 3 4)))
#'user/map__8012
user=> (clojure.core/seq? map__8012)
true
user=> (clojure.lang.PersistentHashMap/create (clojure.core/seq map__8012))
{1 2, 3 4}

Therefor you get nil for key 0 and 4 for key 3.

| improve this answer | |
  • Well, that certainly is the answer :-) – David Tonhofer Apr 29 '19 at 14:06
  • Updated my answer based on this. – Alan Thompson Apr 29 '19 at 15:58
1

The short answer is that only maps & vectors are associative. Lists and sequences are not associative. Map destructuring is defined only for associative structures:

(ns tst.demo.core
  (:use demo.core tupelo.core tupelo.test))

(dotest
  (let [mm {:a 1 :b 2}
        vv [1 2 3]
        ll (list 1 2 3)
        sv (seq vv)
        sl (seq ll) ]
    (spyx (associative? mm))
    (spyx (associative? vv))
    (spyx (associative? ll))
    (spyx (associative? sv))
    (spyx (associative? sl)) ) )

with result:

(associative? mm) => true
(associative? vv) => true
(associative? ll) => false
(associative? sv) => false
(associative? sl) => false

Clojure frequently adopts the (rather harsh) attitude of "garbage-in, garbage-out", instead of throwing an exception if you call a function with invalid arguments.

There is even a warning in ClojureDocs.org

I would argue that functions should be more bulletproof by default (i.e. check arg values/types), and only supply the stripped-down version as clojure.core.raw/get or some similar name.


Update

Based on @cfrick's answer above, we see the genesis of the situation. Since a sequence is not a map, the sequence must be converted into a map before destructuring can occur. Consequently, let assumes you have supplied a sequence of key-value pairs like [k1 v1 k2 v2 ...] which should be converted into as map as with:

(apply hash-map [k1 v1  k2 v2  ...])

If this was not your intent, you should convert the sequence into an associative explicitly by:

(zipmap (range) <the-seq>)

or, more simply:

(vec <the seq>)

Or, you could have supplied clojure with the key-value seq it assumed was present:

(list 0 1  1 2  2 3  3 4)

Note that if your sequence had been of odd length like (list 1 2 3) you would have gotten an error during the implicit conversion from seq to map.

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