3

I open one database at the start, then need to open another database based on user selecting two values. The database selection has to be at run-time and will change every time.

Have tried to access the Connection String using the Connection String class and have tried other options like Singleton which I do not understand. I am running this on a local Windows 10 system running SQL Server Express. Am coding using Asp.Net Core 2.1

> ASP.Net Core v2.1

Building multi tenant, multi year application Every client will have one SQL DATABASE per year

I hope to have a table with the following structure

COMPANY_CODE VARCHAR(3),
COMPANY_YEAR INT,
COMPANY_DBNAME VARCHAR(5)

Sample Data

COMPANY_CODE: AAD
COMPANY_YEAR: 19
COMPANY_DB: AAD19

COMPANY_CODE: AAD
COMPANY_YEAR: 18
COMPANY_DB: AAD18

COMPANY_CODE: AAD
COMPANY_YEAR: 17
COMPANY_DB: AAD17

So, every company will multiple rows - one for each financial year.

The COMPANY_DB column will store the DB name to open for that session.

Once the user is authenticated, I want to change the connection string to point to the database in the COMPANY_DB column of the selected row and then let the logged in user perform transactions.

I am unable to figure out how to change the connection string that is embedded in startup.cs.

Any tips on how to achieve this will be most appreciated.

1
  • Are you using Entity Framework or any other ORM? if yes, specify it. If no, do you have any kind of class that handles the connectionString or SQL connections in your application (which can be used in other classes )? if yes, provide that class, if no, provide a sample code on how things work to connect and do other queries for each user.
    – iSR5
    Apr 29, 2019 at 16:07

1 Answer 1

4

I figured out that you are using one DbContext class for each database. See here for more information: docs. Remove AddDbContext from Startup, remove OnConfiguring from DbContext and pass options to the constructor.

public class BloggingContext : DbContext
{
    public BloggingContext(DbContextOptions<BloggingContext> options)
        : base(options)
    { }

    public DbSet<Blog> Blogs { get; set; }
}

Then, write service providing DbContext:

public interface IBlogContextProvider
{
    BlogContext GetBlogContext(string connectionString);
}

public class BlogContextProvider : IBlogContextProvider
{
    BlogContext GetBlogContext(string connectionString)
    {
        var optionsBuilder = new DbContextOptionsBuilder<BloggingContext>();
        optionsBuilder.UseSqlServer(connectionString);
        return new BlogContext(optionsBuilder);
    }
}

Add service in your Startup.cs:

services.AddScoped<IBlogContextProvider, BlogContextProvider>();

Now you can use DI:

public class HomeController : Controller
{
    private IBlogContextProvider _provider;

    public HomeController(IBlogContextProvider provider)
    {
        _provider = provider;
    }

    public ActionResult Index()
    {
        using (var context = _provider.GetBlogContext(<your connection string>))
        {
            //your code here
        }
        return View();
    }
}

EDIT: Of course, you can write ContextProvider as generic.

1
  • This worked for me. I used optionsBuilder.Options when passing as parameter to DbContext constructor
    – Water
    Aug 12, 2020 at 5:55

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