-1

So for example

cast = ["Barney Stinson", "Robin Scherbatsky", "Ted Mosby", "Lily Aldrin", "Marshall Eriksen"]
heights = [72, 68, 72, 66, 76]

//loop

for i, name in enumerate(cast):
    cast[i] = name + " " + str(heights[i])


print(cast)

If I indent the code to include it in the for loop, the print statement will return multiple copies of my output, and in a completely chaotic order. However when I instead use the print statement without an indent, everything works out fine as I return names and heights in order. Obviously the loop is the problem, but it's not the first time I've encountered this, and i'd appreciate a full in-depth explanation. Thnx!

7
  • Sounds like you need a tutorial! This isn't even executable code.
    – Adam Smith
    Apr 29, 2019 at 19:14
  • Are you trying to change the original list (so that it will contain "Barney Stinson 72" etc) or just return a list of names and heights? Apr 29, 2019 at 19:14
  • 3
    I can't seem to reproduce this "completely chaotic order". The elements are changed from left to right, as expected...
    – Aran-Fey
    Apr 29, 2019 at 19:14
  • If printing in the loop, it probably should be print(cast[i]) Apr 29, 2019 at 19:17
  • 1
    Please show us an output of the chaotic order you are talking about. After running the script I the list being printed in the same order 5 times with a number appended to the name corresponding to the index in question.
    – Edeki Okoh
    Apr 29, 2019 at 19:19

1 Answer 1

3

Whereas languages like C, Go, Java, etc. use braces ({}) do delimit blocks of code, Python uses indentation.

So this code

for i, name in enumerate(cast):
    cast[i] = name + " " + str(heights[i])
print(cast)

will first iterate over cast and reassign its elements (the indented block), before moving on to the next statement, in this case print.

This code on the other hand

for i, name in enumerate(cast):
    cast[i] = name + " " + str(heights[i])
    print(cast)

will print the entire cast out for each iteration of the for loop.

Indentation is a part of Python's core design.

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