-4
std::vector<char>*temp = new std:: vector<char>;
temp->push_back('a');

Do I need to deallocation the memory using delete temp? Or is the memory deallocation taken care by vector?

5
  • 7
    Why are you using a pointer to std::vector in 1st place? And yes, you need to take care about the deallocation. Apr 29, 2019 at 22:27
  • 3
    The rule is that anything you allocate with new, you are responsible for later de-allocating with delete. Since you are allocating temp via new, you'll need to also delete it when you are done using it. What the vector class handles for you is the allocation/deallocation of the items held within the vector (e.g. your a character); it doesn't manage its own allocation/deallocation. Apr 29, 2019 at 22:27
  • 3
    In general, the std::vector itself should be statically allocated. The vector's underlying elements are dynamically allocated and are managed by std::vector.
    – iz_
    Apr 29, 2019 at 22:29
  • 5
    There is almost never a case where you should dynamically allocate a vector, or any other C++ container.
    – user2100815
    Apr 29, 2019 at 22:30
  • They are (albeit rare) cases where you may need to dynamically allocate a container. You should wrap it in a smart pointer, std::unique_ptr or std::shared_ptr, so you don't need to worry about deallocating it manually Apr 30, 2019 at 5:25

2 Answers 2

2

The very point of vector<> is that it internally allocates memory for you and insulates you from all needs to worry about memory management You simply use it like

std::vector<char> temp;
temp.push_back('a');

Then later when temp goes out of scope, all memory stored inside of temp is deleted automatically.

2
  • Thanks everyone for helping me out. Using new operator would allocate memory on the heap that is why I was using heap, are the contents of vector stored on the heap too if the vector is local to function?
    – Wheel60
    May 3, 2019 at 14:51
  • @Wheel60 Yes, the contents of the vector are always stored on the heap. The sizeof(vector) is usually that corresponding to 3 pointers (i.e. a total of 24bytes on 64bit machines), corresponding to the begin and end of the allocated memory and the end of the memory actually used.
    – Walter
    May 4, 2019 at 14:55
0

std::vector contains a internal array. When a vector is destroyed, that array is deleted automatically.

However, if you allocate a pointer to a vector, you need to delete it explicitly. Generally speaking, just use the vector itself, not a pointer to it.

We can see this behavior if we write our own class. This class contains some data, and it prints a message when that data gets destroyed.

class MyClass {
    int* data;
   public:
    MyClass() : data(nullptr) {}
    MyClass(int size) : data = new int[size]() {}
    ~MyClass() {
        std::cout << "Deleting data\n"; 
        delete[] data;
    }
};

Let's look at two functions. One of them just creates MyClass directly, and the other one creates a pointer.

void withoutPointer() {
    MyClass c(10);
    std::cout << "Created MyClass\n"; 
}

With pointer:

void withPointer() {
    MyClass* ptr  = new MyClass(10); 
    std::cout << "Create MyClass*\n"
    std::cout u<< "Exiting function\n"; 
}

If you run withoutPointer(), it will print:

Creating MyClass
Deleting data

This is because the destructor gets called, so the data gets deleted. On the other hand, if you run the one with the pointer, it will print:

Create MyClass*
Exiting function

The pointer was never deleted, so the data never got destroyed.

3
  • Thanks everyone for helping me out. Using new operator would allocate memory on the heap that is why I was using heap, are the contents of vector stored on the heap too if the vector is local to function?
    – Wheel60
    May 3, 2019 at 14:50
  • The data a vector owns (all the elements of the vector) are stored on the heap. Local variables that are vectors live on the stack, though. The part that lives on the stack is only 32 bytes large, so there are no issues with having it on the stack. May 3, 2019 at 19:45
  • Also; having it on the stack ends up being faster. Try to declare variables on the stack if you can. May 3, 2019 at 19:49

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