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i have a homework assignment to capture a 4way handshake between a client and AP using scapy. im trying to use "aircrack-ng capture.pcap" to check for valid handshakes in the capture file i created using scapy

i launch the program using Popen. the program waits for user input so i have to kill it. when i try to get stdout after killing it the output is empty.

i've tried stdout.read(), i've tried communicate, i've tried reading stderr, and i've tried it both with and without shells

check=Popen("aircrack-ng capture.pcap",shell=True,stdin=PIPE,stdout=PIPE,stderr=PIPE)
check.kill()    
print(check.stdout.read())
  • Can't you read before killing ? – Alex van Vliet Apr 30 at 12:47
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    You're not giving it any time at all to finish starting up and run the echo. You need to wait at least a little bit of time -- process startup isn't instant. – Charles Duffy Apr 30 at 12:51
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    Note too that foo & bar kicks off foo in a subprocess, which adds a bunch of complications to the correct operation of kill() (potentially causing the Python read() to hang while waiting for the forked-off subprocess to close its output file descriptors, even if the top-level shell process was killed successfully). If you aren't asking about that specific problem, much better to use && rather than & to connect the echo to the sleep. – Charles Duffy Apr 30 at 13:06
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    For your real command, there's no good reason to use shell=True. Change your command argument to ['aircrack-ng', 'capture.pcap'], take out the shell=True, and thereafter the shell being killed but the copy of aircrack-ng it starts still being alive is one less set of things that can go wrong. – Charles Duffy Apr 30 at 22:57
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    timeout 1 is a hack. Fix the reason your SIGTERM isn't routing to aircap-ng (which could well be the shell=True causing the TERM to go to the sh not the aircap-ng process) and you won't need that hack anymore. – Charles Duffy Apr 30 at 22:58
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While you shouldn't do this (trying to rely on hardcoded delays is inherently race-condition-prone), that the issue is caused by your kill() being delivered while sh is still starting up can be demonstrated by the problem being "solved" (not reliably, but sufficient for demonstration) by tiny little sleep long enough let the shell start up and the echo run:

import time
from subprocess import Popen, PIPE

check=Popen("echo hello && sleep 1000", shell=True, stdin=PIPE, stdout=PIPE, stderr=PIPE)
time.sleep(0.01) # BAD PRACTICE: Race-condition-prone, use one of the below instead.
check.kill()    
print(check.stdout.read())

That said, a much better-practice solution would be to close the stdin descriptor so the reads immediately return 0-byte results. On newer versions of Python (modern 3.x), you can do that with DEVNULL:

import time
from subprocess import Popen, PIPE, DEVNULL

check=Popen("echo hello && read input && sleep 1000", 
            shell=True, stdin=DEVNULL, stdout=PIPE, stderr=PIPE)
print(check.stdout.read())

...or, with Python 2.x, a similar effect can be achieved by passing an empty string to communicate(), thus close()ing the stdin pipe immediately:

import time
from subprocess import Popen, PIPE

check=Popen("echo hello && read input && sleep 1000", 
            shell=True, stdin=PIPE, stdout=PIPE, stderr=PIPE)
print(check.communicate('')[0])
  • time.sleep is unreliable. I cannot approve advising such bad practice to a newbie. – ivan_pozdeev Apr 30 at 13:01
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    Oh, I definitely agree that there's a race condition there. The point isn't to endorse or condone the practice, the point is to demonstrate that their problem was caused by sh being interrupted while still trying to start up. And it definitely succeeds in that demonstration. – Charles Duffy Apr 30 at 13:02
  • thank you for the suggestions! unfortunately passing an empty string to the program also causes it to hang so i need to kill it. i forgot to mention i tried DEVNULL in my post sorry. also i just tried sleeping before killing it and that seems to cause a hang as well – 0rphon Apr 30 at 21:41
  • Notice the read input && sleep 1000 in my examples? That's important; the examples all work, but they depend on the program exiting if it can't read from stdin... which is something well-behaved programs generally do. – Charles Duffy Apr 30 at 22:25
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Never, and I mean, never kill a process as part of normal operation. There's no guarantee whatsoever how far it has proceeded by the time you kill it, so you cannot expect any specific results from it in such a case.

  • To explicitly pass nothing to a subprocess as input to prevent hanging when it tries to read stdin:

  • Use <process>.communicate(), or use subprocess.check_output() instead of Popen to read output reliably

    • A process, in the general case, is not guaranteed to output any data at any particular moment due to I/O buffering. So you need to read the output stream after the process completes to be sure you've got everything.
    • At the same time, you need to keep reading the stream in the meantime if the process can produce enough output to fill an I/O buffer1. Otherwise, it will hang waiting for you to read the buffered data. If both stdout and stderr are PIPEs, you need to read them both, in parallel -- i.e. in different threads.
      • communicate() and check_output (that uses the former under the hood) achieve this by reading stdout and stderr in two separate threads.
  • Prefer convenience functions to Popen for common use cases -- in your case, check_output -- as they take care of all the aforementioned caveats for you.


1Pipes are fully buffered and a typical buffer size is 64KB

  • thanks for the suggestions! unfortunately passing an empty string to the program causes it to hang as well so i need to kill it – 0rphon Apr 30 at 21:42
  • @0rphon sleep 1000 sleeps for 1000 seconds (~16,5 minutes). If your command is completely different, provide a minimal reproducible example for us to be able to say what's happening. – ivan_pozdeev Apr 30 at 21:59
  • i have a homework assignment to capture a 4way handshake between a client and AP using scapy. im trying to use "aircrack-ng capture.pcap" to check for valid handshakes in the capture file i created using scapy – 0rphon Apr 30 at 22:17

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