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The f() function in the class MapSquare works properly.. When I add the other class MapTriple, it is not working. f() function in the MapSquare should find the square of the elements in the vector and in the MapTriple should multiply 3 to all elements.

MapGeneric is the base class which contains the function map() which is a recursive function to access the vector elements and the f() function is a pure virtual function.

MapSquare and MapTriple are two derived classes overrides the f() function to find the square of vector elements and to multiply 3 with all the vector elements.

MapSquare works properly... but when I add MapTriple, segmentation fault occures. Please help to solve this.

#include<vector>
#include<iostream>
#include<cstdlib>
#include<stdio.h>
#include<stdlib.h>
using namespace std;

class MapGeneric
{
   public:
        virtual int f(int){};
        vector<int> map(vector<int>, int);
};
class MapSquare:public MapGeneric
{
   public: int f(int);

};
class MapTriple:public MapGeneric
{
   public: int f(int);
};
class MapAbsolute:public MapGeneric
{
   public: int f(int);
};
vector<int> MapGeneric::map(vector<int> v, int index)
{

   if(index>=1)
   {
      v[index]=f(v[index]);
      return map(v,index-1);
   }
   return v;

}
int MapSquare::f(int x)
{
   return x*x;
}
int MapTriple::f(int x)
{
 return 3*x;
}
int MapAbsolute::f(int x)
{
  return abs(x);
}
int main()
{
   //mapping square
   MapSquare ob;
   vector<int> L,L1,L2;
   for (int i = 1; i <= 5; i++) 
      L.push_back(i);
   L1=ob.map(L,sizeof(L));
   cout<<"Square  = ";
   for ( vector<int>::iterator i = L1.begin(); i != L1.end(); ++i) 
      cout << *i<<" ";

   //mapping triple
   MapTriple t;

   L2=t.map(L,sizeof(L));
   cout<<endl<<"Triple  = ";
   for(vector<int>::iterator i=L2.begin();i!=L2.end();++i)
     cout<<*i<<" ";

   return 0;
 }
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    virtual int f(int){}; what is that?? If you claim a function will return int, maybe try actually doing so. Just saying. Either that or declare that pure-virtual.
    – WhozCraig
    Commented May 1, 2019 at 3:57
  • You're asking us to help you debugging the code, so can you please share your own debug findings first? For example, at which line in your code does this failure take place? Commented May 1, 2019 at 3:57
  • sizeof(L) ==> L.size() and even then you're indexing out of range. Why you're not doing all of that with iterators is the mystery.
    – WhozCraig
    Commented May 1, 2019 at 3:59
  • $g++ -o main *.cpp $main timeout: the monitored command dumped core sh: line 1: 35296 Segmentation fault timeout 10s main
    – Tech Tutor
    Commented May 1, 2019 at 3:59
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    sizeof(L) is not about number of elements in vector, it's a constant value, describing size of vector class. Use L.size() instead.
    – J. S.
    Commented May 1, 2019 at 4:00

1 Answer 1

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A number of problems here. It looks as though you think that C++ indices start at 1, rather than zero?

if(index>=1)
{
   v[index]=f(v[index]);
   return map(v,index-1);
}

To me that immediately looks wrong, surely you mean:

// use size_t for indices (which cannot be negative)
vector<int> MapGeneric::map(vector<int> v, size_t index)
{
  // make sure the index is valid!
  if(index < v.size())
  {
    v[index] = f(v[index]);
    return map(v, index - 1);
  }
  return v;
}

Secondly, the sizeof() operator does not do what you expect!! It returns the size of std::vector (which is usually 24bytes on 64 bit systems - basically 3 pointers). You should use the size() method to determine the length of the array.

// remember that indices are zero based, and not 1 based!
L1=ob.map(L, L.size() - 1);
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  • is there any mistake in the below code? The filter function should filter the odd elements from the vector. bool FilterOdd::g(int x) { if(x%2==1) return true; else return false; } vector<int> FilterGeneric::filter(vector<int> v, size_t index) { vector<int> t; if(index <= v.size()) { if(g(v[index])==true) t.push_back(v[index]); return filter(v, index - 1); } return t; }
    – Tech Tutor
    Commented May 1, 2019 at 4:57

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