8

I have an a numpy object array that is made up of several normal numpy arrays

>> a = np.array([np.arange(5), np.arange(2), np.arange(7)])
>> a
array([array([0, 1, 2, 3, 4]), array([0, 1]), array([0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6])], dtype=object)

And I want to sum all the elements, and that should ideally give me 32. If I use sum(a) I get an error. However, I can get a result using

>> sum([np.sum(array) for array in a])
32

But I was wondering if there is any faster/simpler way to do this?

5
  • No this is pretty good, you are using the python built-in sum to sum up the bigger list, which comprises of the sums of the np.arange lists, and you are using np.sum to sum up the individual numpy arrays! Commented May 1, 2019 at 5:19
  • If your code works but you want to improve it, post on codereview
    – Alec
    Commented May 1, 2019 at 5:21
  • You can remove the square brackets in sum if you want. sum(np.sum(array) for array in a)
    – ZaydH
    Commented May 1, 2019 at 5:23
  • 1
    @alec_a, questions like this are commonly answered by the SO numpy community. CR has fewer numpy eyes, and tends to focus more on good programming style.
    – hpaulj
    Commented May 1, 2019 at 5:36
  • sum(a) tries to do a[0]+a[1]+a[2], and complains about adding a 5 element array to a 2 element one.
    – hpaulj
    Commented May 1, 2019 at 5:42

3 Answers 3

10

Use numpy.concatenate with sum:

print (np.concatenate(a).sum())

print (np.sum(np.concatenate(a)))
32

Performance: Depends of number of nested arrays and number of values in arrays, so best test in real data:

a = np.array([np.arange(5), np.arange(2), np.arange(7)] * 1000) 
#print (a)

In [40]: %timeit np.concatenate(a).sum()
830 µs ± 22.5 µs per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 1000 loops each)

In [41]: %timeit (np.sum(np.concatenate(a)))
835 µs ± 33.5 µs per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 1000 loops each)

#original solution 
In [42]: %timeit sum([np.sum(array) for array in a])
15.3 ms ± 85.9 µs per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 100 loops each)

Another solutions:

In [43]: %timeit sum(np.sum(array) for array in a)
17.4 ms ± 2.27 ms per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 100 loops each)

In [44]: %timeit (sum(np.concatenate(a)))
2.28 ms ± 143 µs per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 100 loops each)
2
  • +1 for the performance analysis. If I get your analysis correctly, the important factors are firstly to use np.sum and not sum, and secondly to concatenate the array a rather than loop on it? Commented May 1, 2019 at 5:42
  • @ItamarMushkin - yes, in numpy is faster use numpy function like python functions, because vectorized. Thank you.
    – jezrael
    Commented May 1, 2019 at 5:43
2

While your code is good, you can also use numpy.concatenate to concatenate your arrays and then calcuate the sum via numpy.sum, python builtin sum, or a sum function over the numpy array

import numpy as np

a = np.array([np.arange(5), np.arange(2), np.arange(7)])

print(np.sum(np.concatenate(a)))
#32

print(sum(np.concatenate(a)))
#32

print(np.concatenate(a).sum())
#32

0
2

You can use map:

>>> sum(map(sum,a))
32

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.