1

In Python code, I have some member variables. I have set the constructor default args to None so that they can be set later. I also have a list to iterate through the members. The problem is, when I set it later, the list does not reflect the updated value. How can this problem be solved so that the list always returns the most upto date value ?

class Foo:
    def __init__(self, x=None, y=None, z=None):
        self.x = x
        self.y = y
        self.z = z
        self.list = [self.x, self.y, self.z]


f = Foo(4)
f.x = 1
f.y = 2
f.z = 3

print(f.list)

Expected result is [1,2,3], but I'm getting [4,None,None]

3
  • 2
    self.list keeps only values copied from self.x, self.y, self.z. It doesn't keep references to self.x, self.y, self.z
    – furas
    May 1 '19 at 11:08
  • as @furas said, I recommend you to debug this in IDE like pycharm, Visual Studio e.t.c. Go step by step and follow the variables May 1 '19 at 11:11
  • you can run code on PythonTutor and you will see references as arrows. Your code will not show arrows.
    – furas
    May 1 '19 at 11:47
9

add list as a property to your class.

class Foo:
    def __init__(self, x=None, y=None, z=None):
        self.x = x
        self.y = y
        self.z = z

    @property
    def list(self):
        return [self.x, self.y, self.z]


f = Foo(4)
f.x = 1
f.y = 2
f.z = 3

print(f.list)

Which outputs:

[1, 2, 3]
2
  • does it create new list instance on every hit ? will it be scalable ?
    – MD Luffy
    May 1 '19 at 12:02
  • 1
    @MDLuffy No, it doesn't create a new list. I tested its changes using property setter, and also changing a simple value, and the id output of returned list was always the same.
    – Ali Tou
    May 1 '19 at 12:38
0

When you do f = Foo(4) , you are setting x to 4 and y and z to None, then when you fo f.x = 1, f.y = 2 etc, you are updating references to f.x , f.y etc not the actual values which will only be updated when you pass them to the constructor, and that is why you get [4, None,None] for f.list

Instead do f = Foo(1,2,3), the print(f.list) should give you [1, 2, 3] since this will ensure the values are updated and not the references like before.

Also change your attribute name from f.list to f.li or something, it is bad practice to use python reserved keywords like list as class attributes.

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