562

Is there any easy LINQ expression to concatenate my entire List<string> collection items to a single string with a delimiter character?

What if the collection is of custom objects instead of string? Imagine I need to concatenate on object.Name.

  • 38
    Why linq and not string.Join() ? – Alan Feb 18 '09 at 1:09
  • 15
    string.Join is better but I think linq makes your code fun, that could be the why! – Ali Ersöz Feb 18 '09 at 1:20
  • 16
    String.Join is better because it uses a StringBuilder and avoids the inherrent O(n^2) performance of repeated concatenation. – Kennet Belenky Jun 21 '10 at 21:05
  • 1
    performance issues using LINQ ? – PreguntonCojoneroCabrón Apr 27 '17 at 17:08

11 Answers 11

538

By using LINQ, this should work;

string delimiter = ",";
List<string> items = new List<string>() { "foo", "boo", "john", "doe" };
Console.WriteLine(items.Aggregate((i, j) => i + delimiter + j));

class description:

public class Foo
{
    public string Boo { get; set; }
}

Usage:

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        string delimiter = ",";
        List<Foo> items = new List<Foo>() { new Foo { Boo = "ABC" }, new Foo { Boo = "DEF" },
            new Foo { Boo = "GHI" }, new Foo { Boo = "JKL" } };

        Console.WriteLine(items.Aggregate((i, j) => new Foo{Boo = (i.Boo + delimiter + j.Boo)}).Boo);
        Console.ReadKey();

    }
}

And here is my best :)

items.Select(i => i.Boo).Aggregate((i, j) => i + delimiter + j)
| improve this answer | |
  • 43
    O(n^2) time strikes again. – Kennet Belenky Jun 21 '10 at 21:03
  • 2
    If you can't see the Aggregate method, you need to add using System.Linq; – Cédric Guillemette Jan 5 '13 at 21:05
  • 7
    Problem is that above LinQ method does not work with empty or single-element list. – Alexander Nov 22 '13 at 12:28
  • 11
    why not just use string.join? Please accept Sedat's answer so that anyone in a rush doesn't choose this solution when Sedat's is the better choice. – Skychan May 13 '16 at 17:03
  • 5
    DO NOT USE THIS. This solution will immediately tank application performance on even a trivial set of strings. Use Sedat's answer with string.Join! – Bryan Boettcher Mar 27 '17 at 20:32
1022
String.Join(delimiter, list);

is sufficient.

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  • 96
    I am all for LINQ solutions but this is more efficient than LINQ and the Aggregate() method. – andleer Feb 20 '09 at 18:29
  • 18
    much cleaner! worked great for me! string.Join(", ", accs.Select(x => x.AccountID).ToArray()), – m4tt1mus Jul 8 '11 at 16:34
  • 34
    @KonstantinSalavatov I had posted my answer before OP had clarified that it had to be in LINQ. It is still perfectly valid for anyone who bumps into this answer while looking for a "not-necessarily-LINQ" solution on Google. Regarding this answer "not useful" in that context is unfair. – Sedat Kapanoglu Jun 1 '12 at 10:47
  • 7
    This can also be used for things other than List<String>s and will call the ToString() method. – Kian Jul 29 '13 at 12:14
  • 1
    @alansiqueira27 well, a List<string> is never a query going to the database. that's an entirely different problem but you can always call .ToList() to a query and merge later. – Sedat Kapanoglu Jan 7 '19 at 20:39
128

This is for a string array:

string.Join(delimiter, array);

This is for a List<string>:

string.Join(delimiter, list.ToArray());

And this is for a list of custom objects:

string.Join(delimiter, list.Select(i => i.Boo).ToArray());
| improve this answer | |
  • 29
    String.Join has an overload that takes an IEnumerable, so you don't need the ToArray() call – arolson101 Nov 14 '11 at 19:14
  • 11
    Keep in mind the IEnumerable overload only exists in 4.0 or later. If you're using an older version you will still need ToArray(). – Rakuen42 May 22 '12 at 20:00
  • 2
    Ah! That last overload was the one I was looking for. I knew there had to be a way to extract a specific property. :) – Mike Devenney Dec 30 '16 at 15:53
57
using System.Linq;

public class Person
{
  string FirstName { get; set; }
  string LastName { get; set; }
}

List<Person> persons = new List<Person>();

string listOfPersons = string.Join(",", persons.Select(p => p.FirstName));
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27

Good question. I've been using

List<string> myStrings = new List<string>{ "ours", "mine", "yours"};
string joinedString = string.Join(", ", myStrings.ToArray());

It's not LINQ, but it works.

| improve this answer | |
  • Why to do you have to call .ToArray() ? – Ε Г И І И О Dec 3 '19 at 1:51
  • 1
    Because back in the bad ole days of 2009, string.Join didn't have an extension that accepted an IEnumerable. – Jacob Proffitt Jan 30 at 0:02
9

You can simply use:

List<string> items = new List<string>() { "foo", "boo", "john", "doe" };

Console.WriteLine(string.Join(",", items));

Happy coding!

| improve this answer | |
8
List<string> strings = new List<string>() { "ABC", "DEF", "GHI" };
string s = strings.Aggregate((a, b) => a + ',' + b);
| improve this answer | |
7

I think that if you define the logic in an extension method the code will be much more readable:

public static class EnumerableExtensions { 
  public static string Join<T>(this IEnumerable<T> self, string separator) {  
    return String.Join(separator, self.Select(e => e.ToString()).ToArray()); 
  } 
} 

public class Person {  
  public string FirstName { get; set; }  
  public string LastName { get; set; }  
  public override string ToString() {
    return string.Format("{0} {1}", FirstName, LastName);
  }
}  

// ...

List<Person> people = new List<Person>();
// ...
string fullNames = people.Join(", ");
string lastNames = people.Select(p => p.LastName).Join(", ");
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3

I have done this using LINQ:

var oCSP = (from P in db.Products select new { P.ProductName });

string joinedString = string.Join(",", oCSP.Select(p => p.ProductName));
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2

You can use Aggregate, to concatenate the strings into a single, character separated string but will throw an Invalid Operation Exception if the collection is empty.

You can use Aggregate function with a seed string.

var seed = string.Empty;
var seperator = ",";

var cars = new List<string>() { "Ford", "McLaren Senna", "Aston Martin Vanquish"};

var carAggregate = cars.Aggregate(seed,
                (partialPhrase, word) => $"{partialPhrase}{seperator}{word}").TrimStart(',');

you can use string.Join doesn’t care if you pass it an empty collection.

var seperator = ",";

var cars = new List<string>() { "Ford", "McLaren Senna", "Aston Martin Vanquish"};

var carJoin = string.Join(seperator, cars);

| improve this answer | |
2

Put String.Join into an extension method. Here is the version I use, which is less verbose than Jordaos version.

  • returns empty string "" when list is empty. Aggregate would throw exception instead.
  • probably better performance than Aggregate
  • is easier to read when combined with other LINQ methods than a pure String.Join()

Usage

var myStrings = new List<string>() { "a", "b", "c" };
var joinedStrings = myStrings.Join(",");  // "a,b,c"

Extensionmethods class

public static class ExtensionMethods
{
    public static string Join(this IEnumerable<string> texts, string separator)
    {
        return String.Join(separator, texts);
    }
}
| improve this answer | |

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