17

How does one filter duplicate types from a tuple?

For example:

using Tuple = std::tuple<int, double, int, double, std::string, std::string>
using FilteredTuple = without_duplicates<Tuple>;

In which without_duplicates is implemented in such a way that it generates the following FilteredTuple type:

std::tuple<int, double, std::string>
4
  • 2
    Do you also need to filter out duplicates if they aren't consecutive? E.g. should without_duplicates<std::tuple<int, char, int>>> be std::tuple<int, char>, or std::tuple<int, char, int>? The latter would likely be easier to accomplish. Commented May 1, 2019 at 20:00
  • Yes srry ill change the example to include that problem Commented May 1, 2019 at 20:01
  • @AndreasLoanjoe What's the actual use case you wan't to resolve with this? Sounds like a XY-problem for me. Commented May 1, 2019 at 20:02
  • I want to construct a vector of variants from a variadic template argument pack. But first I need to determine the variant type without duplicates. The problem above is just the minimal example of what I am struggling with. Commented May 1, 2019 at 20:03

6 Answers 6

19
#include <type_traits>
#include <tuple>

template <typename T, typename... Ts>
struct unique : std::type_identity<T> {};

template <typename... Ts, typename U, typename... Us>
struct unique<std::tuple<Ts...>, U, Us...>
    : std::conditional_t<(std::is_same_v<U, Ts> || ...)
                       , unique<std::tuple<Ts...>, Us...>
                       , unique<std::tuple<Ts..., U>, Us...>> {};

template <typename... Ts>
using unique_tuple = typename unique<std::tuple<>, Ts...>::type;

DEMO

2
  • 1
    Using std::disjunction instead of || may be a better choice due to short-circuiting.
    – xskxzr
    Commented Sep 30, 2021 at 3:07
  • And why use std::type_identity?
    – xskxzr
    Commented Sep 30, 2021 at 3:10
13

This should work:

template <class Haystack, class Needle>
struct contains;

template <class Car, class... Cdr, class Needle>
struct contains<std::tuple<Car, Cdr...>, Needle> : contains<std::tuple<Cdr...>, Needle>
{};

template <class... Cdr, class Needle>
struct contains<std::tuple<Needle, Cdr...>, Needle> : std::true_type
{};

template <class Needle>
struct contains<std::tuple<>, Needle> : std::false_type
{};



template <class Out, class In>
struct filter;

template <class... Out, class InCar, class... InCdr>
struct filter<std::tuple<Out...>, std::tuple<InCar, InCdr...>>
{
  using type = typename std::conditional<
    contains<std::tuple<Out...>, InCar>::value
    , typename filter<std::tuple<Out...>, std::tuple<InCdr...>>::type
    , typename filter<std::tuple<Out..., InCar>, std::tuple<InCdr...>>::type
  >::type;
};

template <class Out>
struct filter<Out, std::tuple<>>
{
  using type = Out;
};


template <class T>
using without_duplicates = typename filter<std::tuple<>, T>::type;

[Live example]

[Godbolt]

It works by iteratively constructing the output tuple. Before each type is added, check (using the predicate contains) whether it's already in the output tuple or not. If not, it's added (the "else" branch of std::conditional), otherwise it's not added (the "then" branch of std::conditional).

4
  • For everybody else interested here is a link to a test: godbolt.org/z/zb01q5 Commented May 1, 2019 at 20:17
  • @AndreasLoanjoe Happy to help, it's fun to wrestle such a challenge every once in a while and put my Prolog/Lisp lectures to use (as logical/functional programming is essentially what template metaprogramming is, albeit with weird syntax). Commented May 1, 2019 at 20:19
  • Yeah I have done some scheme in the past but the syntax can still be dazzling for these kind of operations in C++, passing on the Out argument was the aha moment for me in this one. Commented May 1, 2019 at 20:20
  • Small variant to delay instantiation in conditional to reduce number of instantiations: Demo (274 lines) versus your (782 lines)
    – Jarod42
    Commented Dec 19, 2019 at 9:29
4

If you have access to Boost, then this can be done directly using boost::mp11::mp_unique<your_tuple_type>.

For example:

{
  using not_unique = std::tuple<int, int, char, std::string, double, int>;
  using filtered = boost::mp11::mp_unique<not_unique>;
  static_assert(std::is_same_v<std::tuple<int, char, std::string, double>, filtered>);
}
{
  using already_unique = std::tuple<int, char, std::string, double>;
  using filtered = boost::mp11::mp_unique<already_unique>;
  static_assert(std::is_same_v<std::tuple<int, char, std::string, double>, filtered>);
}

Live example

4

I have found it is often more easy to reason about 'if constexpr' statements, than it is to parse the std::conditional in my head.

To that end I have adjusted Piotr's answer to fit in that form: Live Demo

template < typename T, typename ...Rest >
constexpr auto make_unique_tuple( std::tuple< T, Rest... > )
{
    if constexpr ( ( std::is_same_v< T, Rest > || ... ) )
    {
        return make_unique_tuple( std::tuple< Rest... >{} );
    }
    else
    {
        if constexpr ( sizeof...( Rest ) > 0 )
        {
            using remaining = decltype( make_unique_tuple( std::tuple< Rest... >{} ) );
            return std::tuple_cat( std::tuple< T >{}, remaining{} );
        }
        else
        {
            return std::tuple< T >{};
        }
    }
}
4
  • While I really like that answer and upvoted it, there are two things that should perhaps be noted: - Passing the tuple as argument is superflous (could simply use the template parameter, which would enable use for types not proving constexpr constructor). -If my understanding it correct, it may "reorder" your elements. For example, passing int, float, int will make tuple<float, int> and not tuple<int, float>.
    – Erel
    Commented Sep 6, 2022 at 19:54
  • The arguments will not be reordered, but only the last unique arguments remain, in their respective ordering.
    – Arjan
    Commented Sep 7, 2022 at 12:56
  • Yes, " reorder " is probably not the correct term. I could not find the appropriate word for that (which is why I gave an example and quoted it).
    – Erel
    Commented Sep 7, 2022 at 13:35
  • 1
    Using the constexpr function approach is very nice and clean form of metaprogramming but be aware that it usually adds more requirements to the types. For example, in this case, all the types need to be default constructible and copyable.
    – SoilRos
    Commented Jan 9, 2023 at 12:40
3

Piotr's code is very concise and should be prefered. Here an extended version for general variadic templated classes which works on C++17 (e.g. std::variant or custom containers):

#include <type_traits>

// end of recursive call: tuple is forwared using `type`
template <typename T, typename... Ts>
struct unique_impl {using type = T;};

// recursive call: 1. Consumes the first type of the variadic arguments, 
//                    if not repeated add it to the tuple.  
//                 2. Call this again with the rest of arguments
template <template<class...> class Tuple, typename... Ts, typename U, typename... Us>
struct unique_impl<Tuple<Ts...>, U, Us...>
    : std::conditional_t<(std::is_same_v<U, Ts> || ...)
                       , unique_impl<Tuple<Ts...>, Us...>
                       , unique_impl<Tuple<Ts..., U>, Us...>> {};

// forward definition
template <class Tuple>
struct unique_tuple;

// class specialization so that tuple arguments can be extracted from type
template <template<class...>class Tuple, typename... Ts>
struct unique_tuple<Tuple<Ts...>> : public unique_impl<Tuple<>, Ts...> {};

Live Demo

If you need C++11 you just need to replace the fold expression (std::is_same_v<U, Ts> || ...) to use a self-made disjunction<...> (see cppreference possible implementation).

0

C++11 implementation, based on Piotr Skotnicki and SoilRos answers:

#include <type_traits> // for std::false_type, std::conditional

namespace meta {

// Port of std::disjunction from C++14
// Based on: https://en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/types/disjunction

template <typename ... Types>
struct disjunction
        : std::false_type
{};

template <typename B1>
struct disjunction<B1>
        : B1
{};

template <typename B1, typename ... Bn>
struct disjunction<B1, Bn...>
    : std::conditional<
        bool(B1::value),
        B1,
        disjunction<Bn...>
    >::type
{};

} // namespace meta


namespace meta {

/**
    # Example of usage

    @code{.cpp}
    template <typename ... Types>
    using unique_tuple = typename unique<std::tuple<>, Types ...>::type;

    unique_tuple<bool, int, float, int, int, float> tuple; // --> std::tuple<bool, int, float>

    // - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

    template <typename ... Types>
    using unique_variant = typename unique<std::variant<>, Types...>::type;

    unique_variant<bool, int, float, int, int, float> var; // --> std::variant<bool, int, float>
    @endcode
*/


/**
    End of recursive call: tuple is forwared using `type`

    Note: In C++20 it may be implemented like:

    @code{.cpp}
    template <typename T, typename ... Types>
    struct unique : std::type_identity<T> {};
    @endcode
*/
template <typename T, typename ... Types>
struct unique {
    using type = T;
};

/**
    Recursive call:
      1. Consumes the first type of the variadic arguments,
         if not repeated add it to the tuple.
      2. Call this again with the rest of arguments

    Note: In C++17 it may be implemented by using fold-expression:

    @code{.cpp}
    template <
        template<class...> class Tuple, typename... TupleTypes,
        typename U, typename... Us
    >
    struct unique<Tuple<TupleTypes...>, U, Us...>
        : std::conditional<
            (std::is_same_v<U, TupleTypes> || ...)
            , unique_impl<Tuple<TupleTypes...>, Us...>
            , unique_impl<Tuple<TupleTypes..., U>, Us...>>::type
    {};
    @endcode
*/
template <
        template<class...> class Tuple, typename... TupleTypes,
        typename U, typename... Us
>
struct unique< Tuple<TupleTypes...> , U, Us...>
    : std::conditional<
        disjunction< std::is_same<U, TupleTypes> ... >::value
        , unique<Tuple<TupleTypes...>, Us...>
        , unique<Tuple<TupleTypes..., U>, Us...>
     >::type
{};

} // namespace meta

Compile-time tests/validation:

#include <tuple>

namespace tests {

using namespace meta;

// No-types check
static_assert(std::is_same<
    unique< std::tuple<> >::type,
    std::tuple<>
>::value == true, "Test failed");

// Single type check
static_assert(std::is_same<
    unique< std::tuple<>, bool >::type,
    std::tuple<bool>
>::value == true, "Test failed");

// No-duplicates check
static_assert(std::is_same<
    unique< std::tuple<>, bool, int, float >::type,
    std::tuple<bool, int, float>
>::value == true, "Test failed");

// Single duplicate check
static_assert(std::is_same<
    unique< std::tuple<>, int, int>::type,
    std::tuple<int>
>::value == true, "Test failed");

// Multiple duplicates check
static_assert(std::is_same<
    unique< std::tuple<>, int, int, int, int, int >::type,
    std::tuple<int>
>::value == true, "Test failed");

// Few duplicates check
static_assert(std::is_same<
    unique< std::tuple<>, int, int,    float, float >::type,
    std::tuple<int, float>
>::value == true, "Test failed");

// Duplicates in the middle check
static_assert(std::is_same<
    unique< std::tuple<>, bool,    int, int, int, float, float, float,    double >::type,
    std::tuple<bool, int, float, double>
>::value == true, "Test failed");

// Duplicates mixed check
static_assert(std::is_same<
    unique< std::tuple<>, bool,    int, int, int,    float,   double, double,    int,    bool, bool>::type,
    std::tuple<bool, int, float, double>
>::value == true, "Test failed");

// Duplicates mixed check
static_assert(std::is_same<
    unique< std::tuple<>, bool, int, float,    bool, int, float >::type,
    std::tuple<bool, int, float>
>::value == true, "Test failed");

// Duplicated type-alias check
static_assert(std::is_same<
    unique< std::tuple<>, short, int, std::int16_t,    std::int32_t >::type,
    std::tuple<short, int>
>::value == true, "Test failed");

// Duplicated type-alias check
static_assert(std::is_same<
    unique< std::tuple<>, signed char, std::int8_t >::type,
    std::tuple<signed char>
>::value == true, "Test failed");

} // namespace tests

[Godbolt]

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